Date   

Re: Naperville 2008

skibbs4 <mmrace4@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Has anyone heard anything about NEXT year's Naperville dates?
We
have been moving "forward" in days, away from Halloween, but Martin
may
or may not continue that next year.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
Isn't it always the last weekend in October, no matter what day of the
week Halloween falls on? Can't imagine 2008 would be any different.

Mike Skibbe


Steam Era Books

Barry Bennett <Barrybennetttoo@...>
 

Hiya

Smith's Model Engines Rail Books on eBay has some interesting books at
interesting prices, providing you are prepared to pay transatlantic
postage.

Cheers

Barry Bennett


Re: Freight car classes

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Ferko" <destron@...> wrote:
Is there a list somewhere that gives the class designations for
freight
cars for each series of running numbers of the ATSF, UP and the B&O?
Terry Metcalfe's book "Union Pacific Freight Cars: 1936-51" has this
information for the U.P. roster as of October 1951. I can send you an
Excel file version, if you want it.

Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


Re: Freight car classes

al_brown03
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Ferko" <destron@...> wrote:

<snip>


Also: what other roads used such a system of in-house classification
for
cars?
SAL and ACL both had freight-car classes, though Seaboard was a tad
casual about them. Some cars didn't have classes (e.g. the GF&A
boxcars); most of the boxcars re-built to stock cars were re-classified
but IIRC at least one wasn't.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: [SPAM] gondola interiors

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Ed Mines queried:


What do you guys use as debris in your models?

Scrap stripwood, simulating blocking, and some fine sand from the street outside. Glued in with
diluted white glue. As yet, the rain hasn't loosened up the glue . . .8^)

SGL


Re: gondola interiors

CJ Riley
 

ED,

I have put debris in most of my gons. Dirt, weeds, rust scraps, a few ferns,
left over wood blocking. Almost anything could be in there, Standard scenery
techniques were used.

CJ Riley






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Re: My New Compressor

Rob & Bev Manley
 

That looks like the upgrade on my 25 year old Campbell Hausfeld. It still works good. Just ask my steam era freight cars.

Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: cf5250
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, October 08, 2007 4:15 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: My New Compressor


Bill Welch wrote (a while back)

> I received my new compressor last week and I am very pleased. It is a
> Campbell-Hausfeld Model # FP2040. Here is the link, I hope it works!
http://aircompressorsdirect.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=3_180_26&;products_id=119

============================================================

Bill, I'm looking for a new compressor. This one looks good.
Two questions -- How is it holding up? And is it oil-less? The
web site doesn't indicate if it uses oil or not.

Thanks
Tim O'Connor


Re: gondola interiors

Russ Strodtz <railfreightcars@...>
 

In reality the floors of gons were seldom visible. By the time it
had been through about 10 cycles of loading and unloading scrap
with a magnet the bottom would be covered with dirt. Since the
scrap is usually just laying on the ground a certain amount of dirt
goes along for the ride. A little rain and it's on the floor.

The great majority of scrap yards that did not have their own scales
required a "light weight" before loading or after unloading. This is
probably something that can be worked into an operational procedure.
Scrap yards were not working on big margins anyway and did not want
to pay for an extra half ton of dirt and non-ferrous debris.

Speaking of non-ferrous there was one scrap yard served by the
St Paul that usually loaded brass and copper in MILW 51xxx series
single door boxes. Security was obviously high on their list even
40 or more years ago. Had a simple anti-theft device. A small piece
of angle iron was always welded to the lower door tracks at the backs
of both doors. Not much chance of breaking into that car.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, 09 October, 2007 12:18
Subject: Re: [STMFC] gondola interiors


Ed Mines wrote:
Were the interiors of mill gons painted? Mill products wouldn't do much scratching.How about regular gons?
The heck they wouldn't!! But nearly every gondola interior photo I can think of shows paint. It protects the steel. Of course the paint job wasn't too great after some service.

Has anyone ever seen a puddle in a gon or a picture of a gon? There are no holes for drainage.
Sure, in a number of cases.

In the era when most exposed steel rusted . . .
Steel still rusts, Ed. It's thermodynamics. <g>
Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,


Re: gondola interiors

jerryglow2
 

Of course, if it's got great interior detail like
http://www.pbase.com/tracktime/image/86893373 why bother covering it
up with a load? BTW that was from the just completed Western
Prototype Modeler meet: http://www.pbase.com/tracktime/wpm2007&;page=1

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, RUTLANDRS@... wrote:

Ed,
Happened to build one of the Seaboard gons some years ago.
Think I used
an old MDC/Roundhouse kit. The sides had large slits cut into them
between
the "stakes" at floor level and they were what appeared to be an
off white.
Loaded it with shrub roots for stumps and it looked pretty good
and even won a
prize in a LHS contest. The rest of your questions I can't answer.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Caswell gons in sulphur service?

Bob Lucas
 

Were Caswell GS gondolas utilized by the Sante Fe for raw sulphur
traffic? See mention of another ATSF class (Ga-13 and Ga-19) cars
designated as "sulphur gondolas". What is a "sulphur gondola"? If the
Caswell design cars did handle sulphur, what was the nature of that
traffic? Bob


Re: Freight car classes

SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 10/9/2007 7:43:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
destron@vcn.bc.ca writes:

Also: what other roads used such a system of in-house classification for
cars?
PRR see Rob Schoenberg's site for this information
http://prr.railfan.net/freight/

Rich Orr


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Re: Freight car classes

SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 10/9/2007 7:43:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
destron@vcn.bc.ca writes:

I'd
most specifically be interested in the cars of the early 1950 (1950-1953).
The B&O Historical Society has some of these mostly hoppers and Boxcars.

Rich Orr


**************************************
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Re: gondola interiors

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ed Mines wrote:
Were the interiors of mill gons painted? Mill products wouldn't do much scratching.How about regular gons?
The heck they wouldn't!! But nearly every gondola interior photo I can think of shows paint. It protects the steel. Of course the paint job wasn't too great after some service.

Has anyone ever seen a puddle in a gon or a picture of a gon? There are no holes for drainage.
Sure, in a number of cases.

In the era when most exposed steel rusted . . .
Steel still rusts, Ed. It's thermodynamics. <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: gondola interiors

seaboard_1966
 

Ed

In today world of railroading, gons are NOT cleaned out from load to load, not that I see anyhow. I have seen the insides of steel gons with all sorts of debris in them. This ranges from wood used to secure previous loads to just plain and simple trash. There are gons that are in assigned service..That is the are assigned to serve a particular plant only. Many of the gons of this nature serve in a manner that scrap steel is brought into a plant and then finished product is hauled out in them. This is NOT to say that this is the case with ALL gons.

The Seaboard had gons that were steel sided and had drains at the bottoms of the side panels to allow the muck to flow out of the cars. Remember also that this was often the last type of service that the cars would be used in. Gons in stump service were just a couple of switches from heading the scrap yard or into MofW service.

Denis Blake
Marysville, OH

----- Original Message -----
From: "ed_mines" <ed_mines@yahoo.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2007 12:57 PM
Subject: [STMFC] gondola interiors


Were gondola interiors ever cleaned? I think debris would accumulate
for many years before it was discarded.

For many high side, fixed end gons you would have to throw debris
over a side almost as tall as you were.

You couldn't sweep out drop bottom gons. The ends usually drop down
inside the car.

Were the interiors of mill gons painted? Mill products wouldn't do
much scratching.How about regular gons?

Has anyone ever seen a puddle in a gon or a picture of a gon? There
are no holes for drainage.

How about weeds growing? I think that the many Seaboard composite
gons were used to haul stumps to be made into turpentine. Certainlt
soil would was off when it rained.

In the era when most exposed steel rusted I can understand why some
railroads would order wood floors.

What do you guys use as debris in your models?

Where steel bands used in the steam era?

Ed




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gondola interiors

ed_mines
 

Were gondola interiors ever cleaned? I think debris would accumulate
for many years before it was discarded.

For many high side, fixed end gons you would have to throw debris
over a side almost as tall as you were.

You couldn't sweep out drop bottom gons. The ends usually drop down
inside the car.

Were the interiors of mill gons painted? Mill products wouldn't do
much scratching.How about regular gons?

Has anyone ever seen a puddle in a gon or a picture of a gon? There
are no holes for drainage.

How about weeds growing? I think that the many Seaboard composite
gons were used to haul stumps to be made into turpentine. Certainlt
soil would was off when it rained.

In the era when most exposed steel rusted I can understand why some
railroads would order wood floors.

What do you guys use as debris in your models?

Where steel bands used in the steam era?

Ed


Freight car classes

Ferko <destron@...>
 

Is there a list somewhere that gives the class designations for freight
cars for each series of running numbers of the ATSF, UP and the B&O? I'd
most specifically be interested in the cars of the early 1950 (1950-1953).

Also: what other roads used such a system of in-house classification for
cars?

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: White Glue

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Neither white nor yellow carpenters glue are waterproof, nor are they sealants. However, they are quite water-resistant, and in this regard are totally satisfactory for our modeling purposes unless we are making flood plans.

Even on boats, ordinary white glue has been commonly used for years (32 in my own case) for fastening the thousands of wood plugs that cover the screw heads on varnished side and deck planking.

Use these glues in your modeling as glues are intended to be used, and be happy.

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: gondola interiors

Charles Hladik
 

Ed,
Happened to build one of the Seaboard gons some years ago. Think I used
an old MDC/Roundhouse kit. The sides had large slits cut into them between
the "stakes" at floor level and they were what appeared to be an off white.
Loaded it with shrub roots for stumps and it looked pretty good and even won a
prize in a LHS contest. The rest of your questions I can't answer.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division



************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


Re: Strathmore

Peter Weiglin
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

Paper is a time honored model railroad construction material, the
most common type being Strathmore, the brand of a type of Bristol
board, a high, or even pure, rag content paper of archival quality
that is very dense, quick stiff, and has a variety of surfaces. It
is sold in art stores in several thicknesses, the most common being
about .008" - .010" (you will have to measure this yourself inasmuch
as the art store will have no idea what you are talking about). The
great pioneering modeler Bill Clouser was a great promoter of
Strathmore, and many of his models were constructed of this material
(he later became an enthusiast -the first?-- of resin casting!).

= = =

Bill's article on Strathmore was in the February 1959 Model Railroader, with the companion article on painting in the March 1959 issue. The material then came in five thicknesses, from .005 to .025, labeled from "1-ply" to 5-ply." But that was long ago. A check of Strathmore's web site shows the following available at art stores, in smooth (called "plate") surface 500 Series Bristol Board. Comes in 23" x 29" sheets.

235-072 2-Ply Plate Surface
235-073 3-Ply Plate Surface
235-074 4-Ply Plate Surface.

I guess the 5-ply ("075") didn't sell that well. There is a 1-ply Bristol available, I believe, although it's not listed under "071"); it's handy for rivet strips and overlays. As I remember, Testor's model airplane cement and Ambroid were the adhesives I used to build "layered" models.

The key to using Strathmore is completely sealing the model. I followed Bill's lead and used automobile gray body primer, which was then sanded and painted with lacquers. (It was a long time ago...) I recently had the good fortune to find some models I scratchbuilt from Strathmore using this method, (including my first, a CCT trolley freight motor built around 1962), and they had not warped or distorted in the intervening 35 - 45 (ouch!) years. They still look pretty good next to my scratchbuilt brass stuff, too.

Peter Weiglin
Amelia, OH


Re: Rock Island Question

George Hollwedel
 

Thanks Tim!

Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:
They appear to be body color in a black & white builder photo and
also may appear that way in a color photo in the RI 'Color Guide'.
But it's hard to tell dirt from paint after a few years.


At 10/7/2007 01:05 PM Sunday, you wrote:
In 1951 Rock Island received 2,000 PS-1 boxcars from Pullman with the "100 Years of Progress" logo. Were the trucks black or car body color?

Thanks,

George Hollwedel



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Prototype N Scale Models
by George Hollwedel
proto.nscale@yahoo.com
310 Loma Verde Street
Buda, TX 78610-9785
512-796-6883

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