Date   

Re: Back to Car Classes...

Eric Hiser <ehiser@...>
 

Richard Hendrickson observed that "all of the Santa Fe's steam era class
symbols are completely covered in Larry Occhiello's 'Listing of Freight cars
by Class and Car Number 1906-1991,' published by the Santa Fe railway
Historical and Modeling Society (but now, unfortunately, out of print)."

As the publications coordinator for the Society, I'd be interested in
knowing if this group has an interest in a reprint or a CD version of
Larry's magisterial work. Please let me know off-list at ehiser@msn.com.

Thanks,
Eric Hiser
Publications Coordinator
Santa Fe Railway Historical & Modeling Society, Inc.
ehiser@msn.com


Main Line Models Stock Car

parkvarieties <parkvarieties@...>
 

Does anyone know if there is a specific prototype for the Main Line
Models 36' stock car kit that came out in the mid-1960's? I've
checked product reviews of the kit and none make any mention of
prototypes. Thanks.
Frank Brua


Gypsum

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Talked to a CN engineer last night who works out of Ft Dodge Iowa. He
said their shuttle driver the other night was a retired CNW guy who had
first hired out on the FDDM&S. He knew who served what in Ft Dodge and
even took movies of the FDDM&S (diesel yrs).
Anyway, he said the gypsum plants would load 40 box cars a day (20 each
shift). One end would be stacked with wall board (spare me the
names : ) and the other end would be filled with bags of plaster.
Besides 40 box cars a day there were BH flats of wall board and hoppers
of chunk gyp (mainly for cement plants) I forgot how many FDDM&S switch
jobs worked there, there were several.
Interesting?
Clark Propst


Re: Will this work?

NHJJ4@...
 

If you want to use "Tape Weights"
Try a Auto Parts store or Tire shop. I used to buy a Box of 1/4 oz weights
for about $20.00
each stick has 12 sections X 48 sticks per box = A lot more than anybody
else for the money.
Heck take them to the club or give to friends like I do
Name is
Perfect Wheel Weights.
PEC
PO BOX 600
La Vergne TN 37086
Sizes are
Part # 200624S Qty 48 Strips 1/4 oz segments
Or
Part # 100360 Qty 30 Strips 1/4 oz segments
Or
Part # 100720 Qty 60-Strips 1/4 oz segments
Or
Part # 300360 Qty 30 Strips 1/2 oz segments
there are a lot more but you get the idea.
A pack of Lead Wt is about 3 Oz for $5.50
Same stuff but no name stamped in it.
Think I will be cheep.
I have gotten boxes at Pep Boys, Goodyear. Others may sell boxes also.
Heck Buy a box sell them at $1.00 a strip and make money
at least with the $$$ you get you can buy more cars to build.
Jim



************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


Re: Sunshine Models Prototype Modelers Seminar Naperville

Tim O'Connor
 

Scalper!!

:-)

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@worldnet.att.net>
If anyone is considering going to Naperville but would like a spot at
the early pre-registration rate, please contact me off list. I've run
into a conflict and will not be able to attend.


Ben Hom


Re: Moving

golden1014
 

Walter, I've moved six times in 12 years. The answer is easy. It's
called U-Haul. It's cheaper than UPS.

Back to STMFC.

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@...> wrote:

Hi,

Well, I'm moving. We've found a wonderful town, Pullman,
Washington,
and rented a house with a BIG BASEMENT! Now we've started getting
everything else arranged and I've run into a list of forbidden
items
for the movers, including paint and paint thinners. Like most of
the
rest of you I've a collection of paint going back several decades,
and
don't want to even begin thinking about starting anew. So, what
have
the others on this list who have moved done? How did you get all
your
stuff to the new address? I'm open to creative ideas, I just don't
want either a fine or jail time<g>.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Riverside, California (until January)


Re: Moving (Paint and Thinners)

Jim Betz
 

How you gonna get there your self? How you gonna move your vehicles?
Why not pack it up and drive it there your self?


Sunshine Models Prototype Modelers Seminar Naperville

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

If anyone is considering going to Naperville but would like a spot at
the early pre-registration rate, please contact me off list. I've run
into a conflict and will not be able to attend.


Ben Hom


Re: Car travel

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Posted by: "Russ Strodtz" I'd like to make a few commnets on Russ's post based on my recollections from the 60's when I was involved with car distribution.
===================

> Rob, The flat statement was made that these cars were sent loaded or empty
back to Canada. I responded that that was not always the case and if
it was some kind of rule how was it implemented or enforced.

Looking right now at a record for CP 265790 on 19-Jul-59. This car
was loaded with glass bottles at Streator IL and is going to some
undetermined point on the CGW. It is difficult to see how that loading
and routing would get the car back to Canada.
Read Mr. Jackman's post on the subject.
------------------

It should be noted that the case mentioned was very unusual, and it was clearly illegal. Loading Canadian cars within the US was a violation of customs regulations and subject to federal penalties. For that reason most roads had strong policies about Canadian cars. On the NYC it was forbidden to load Canadian cars other than to or via Canada.
================

> It was not until the use of computers took over car distribution that
anyone paid very much attention to any "Rule".
----------------

This is absolutly false. Most railroads tried to observe car service rules and that was part of the training of every yard clerk. Before computers, it was an honor system that was effective most of the time. Of course there were numerous violations because it was next to impossible to detect most of them. But everyone knew that for the system to work overall, as it did, most times it had to be followed. In the 50's and 60's, before computers, much more of business was conducted on the basis of trust than is true today, and in those days you could trust people a lot more than today. That was a time when most people in the suburbs didn't lock their houses during the day.
===============================

> The "Clerks just issued empty waybills to Canada" was a rather feeble
attempt at some humor. I did not find it humorous.

> Yes, the Clerk, Agent, or Operator would hand write an empty waybill.
The destination on that waybill would conform to the current instructions
from the Transportation Department of the Railroad he/she worked for.
--------

In my experience, use of waybills for empty general service cars was the exception on most railroads. Usually such cars were moved in accordance with car distribution orders on each railroad. There were general CD orders that said what to do with each kind of empty, by type and subtype and marks. The order might say to home route all surplus cars of a type or a group of marks. The only time a memo bill would be needed would be for an indirect connection car moving on record rights to indicate the off-line juntion for that car. BTW, suhc bills were not waybills in the legal sense, except for special equipment governed by CSD's. We called the memo bills. They might be simply an IBM card or other piece of paper that would be included in a stack of real waybills.



Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Will this work?

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

I'm considering ways of adding weight to an empty Eastern Car
Works........... brass stock would be roughly 3/64" thick stock cut
to the same width and
length as the styrene floor piece.
Rob, have you weighted that brass sheet? It seems to me that Athearn
weights are about an 1/8 of an inch thick.

Ed


Re: Car travel

jim peters
 

Michael,

It would surprise me if you had seen a lot of Mexican cars in California . . . The furthest western conncetion of the NdeM with the US rail system was at El Paso, Texas. The FCP (ex SPdeM) interchanged at Nogalos, Arizona. The Sonora-Baja California (S-BC) was not completed until December 1947 and connected with the SP at Mexicali at the lower end of the Imperial Valley.

We are discussing the 1940's and 50's and most of the trade with Mexico during this period would have been with the industrialized areas of New York, Pennsylvania and the Great Lakes.
Have a great day,

Jim Peters
Coquitlam, BC


To: STMFC@yahoogroups.comFrom: goldrod_1@yahoo.comDate: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 15:57:54 -0700Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Car travel




Thank you for the info, it really helps. Living in the West/Southwest for most of my life I do not recall see that many Mexico railroad cars. The one place I did see them was at a shingle lumber mill in Santa Ana, CA in the 70s ( I know that date is beyond the scoop of the group). But even in photos taken in the 40s and 50s there are a lot of Canadian road names, just not that many from Mexico. Michaeljim peters <mikado2206@hotmail.com> wrote:Michael,Yes, the same rule did hold true. As to how much traffic came north from Mexico I can not answer your question with regards to the late 40's or 1950's; but . . . In the early stages of World War II, the United States realized that Mexico as well as the rest of Latin America could furnish key materials required for the war effort. The Mexican government could not deliver the quantity of materials at the rate they were required with its railway system rundown and still trying to recover from the effects of the revolution. With negotiations between the two countries the UNITED STATES RAILWAY MISSION TO MEXICO was developed.Sponsored by the Institute of Inter-American Transportation, a subsidiary of the Office of Inter-American Affairs (OIAA) and headed by Nelson A. Rockefeller, the mission greatly increased the ability of the Ferrocarriles Nacionales de Mexico (NdeM) to safely carry large amounts of supplies, especially to the United States. By the end of 1942 this essential traffic north reached an estimated 1,300,000 tons.As a special note, the mission was the first massive American technical assistance program to a foreign country and as a measure of its success was instrumental in the development of the Marshall Plan of 1948.Maybe others have additional information, when added to this could better answer your question.You have a good day,Jim PetersCoquitlam, BCTo: STMFC@yahoogroups.comFrom: goldrod_1@yahoo.comDate: Wed, 17 Oct 2007 01:18:41 -0700Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Car travelWould this rule hold true for cars that came from Mexico? And how much traffic did come Mexico in the 40s and 50s?Michael BishopRuss Strodtz <railfreightcars@19main.com> wrote:Bruce,Interesting rule. How was it enforced before the days of computersystems?Russ> > As for Canadian cars, the rules were pretty simple. IIRC, they could > travel to the US with Canadian cargo. They could not, in general, > travel between points in the US with domestic lading. I'm pretty > sure that they could also return to Canada loaded.>>> Regards> Bruce> > Bruce F. Smith> Auburn, AL---------------------------------Looking for a deal? Find great prices on flights and hotels with Yahoo! FareChase. __________________________________________________________Send a smile, make someone laugh, have some fun! Start now!http://www.freemessengeremoticons.ca/?icid=EMENCA122__________________________________________________Do You Yahoo!?Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com


_________________________________________________________________
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Re: Moving

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

I faced this same problem- twice. I solved it both times by simply carrying all the paints in the trunk of the car.

Denny
--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: Will this work?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
Our listmeister Mike has this very car, with no supplemental weight and has shown that it behaves quite nicely, even when shoving long cuts through turnouts (admittedly BIG turnouts <G>)
Not only big turnouts but quite good trackwork. YMMV, as they say.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


North Shore Model RR Club Open House

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

This Saturday and Sunday the NSMRC, in Wakefield MA, is holding its
annual Open House. Trains will be running at the club both days, and
the dealer's show will be held on Saturday.

Its your chance to see beautiful trains running on this large, very
well sceniced, famous layout. For all the details, times, directions,
and photos see our website www.nsrmc.org.

regards,

Andy Miller


Re: Moving

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Walter, on each of my moves, I've moved certain "forbidden" items myself. As
I own a pickup, which I had to drive to the new location, this was possible.
You are correct, commercial movers do not like paint, gasoline cans, motor
oil, household cleaners, chemicals, etc. Each of us have a collection of
model paints, glues, and various other chemicals that movers will not
handle. I box them up and these items/boxes all go into my pickup, along
with the lawn mower (easier than preparing it for the moving van). I let the
moving company know I will be doing this and they really appreciate it. If
your vehicle will handle it, you might consider renting a small trailer for
the items you need to move yourself.

Shipping via UPS is certainly an option. Mailorder hobby shops ship model
paint all the time via this method.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.488 / Virus Database: 269.14.13/1075 - Release Date: 10/17/2007
9:38 AM


Re: Will this work?

Bruce Smith
 

On Oct 18, 2007, at 1:36 AM, Rob Kirkham wrote:
So, beyond the fact that it might be tricky to get the moulds just the right
depth, why else won't this idea work?

Thanks for your thoughts. (Yes, I know I could hide weight in the
underframe. That's the fall-back.)

Rob Kirkham
Rob,

While weighting cars is generally a good idea, it isn't "the law" <G>. As such, on difficult to weight cars like this, why bother? Our listmeister Mike has this very car, with no supplemental weight and has shown that it behaves quite nicely, even when shoving long cuts through turnouts (admittedly BIG turnouts <G>)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
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| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Will this work?

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Rob,

Why not just put some A-Line or Chooch tape weights on the underside of the floor as I did? The fishbelly sill will hide these nicely. I know it might be tempting to put brake rigging under the car, but nobody will see it when it is on the layout. Even list member Richard Hendrickson takes the easy way out with some of his fishbelly cars, so you would be in good company.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Rob Kirkham wrote:

I'm considering ways of adding weight to an empty Eastern Car Works PRR G26 gondola, and had an idea that may be a little crazy, but I thought I'd see if any have gone down this route before.

I was thinking if I were to press the styrene part into flat air dry clay (say rolled out on a plate of glass), I could make a mould of sorts to duplicate the surface detail. Then if I poured some casting material (I was thinking slow drying epoxy resin) into it and then laid a sheet of brass right into the mould, I could create a floor that was for the most part brass, but with the surface detail of the styrene part. I was thinking the brass stock would be roughly 3/64" thick stock cut to the same width and length as the styrene floor piece.

I also thought that if that worked, I would create a similar mould for the bottom frame side of the part, and lay the brass/epoxy piece from step one into that, thus picking up that detail as well.

The part would then have the detail of the stryene piece on both sides and yet have the weight of the brass (or I could substitute lead I suppose) that was laid into it.

So, beyond the fact that it might be tricky to get the moulds just the right depth, why else won't this idea work?

Thanks for your thoughts. (Yes, I know I could hide weight in the underframe. That's the fall-back.)

Rob Kirkham
(Also in Vancouver, B.C.)


Will this work?

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

I'm considering ways of adding weight to an empty Eastern Car Works PRR G26 gondola, and had an idea that may be a little crazy, but I thought I'd see if any have gone down this route before.

I was thinking if I were to press the styrene part into flat air dry clay (say rolled out on a plate of glass), I could make a mould of sorts to duplicate the surface detail. Then if I poured some casting material (I was thinking slow drying epoxy resin) into it and then laid a sheet of brass right into the mould, I could create a floor that was for the most part brass, but with the surface detail of the styrene part. I was thinking the brass stock would be roughly 3/64" thick stock cut to the same width and length as the styrene floor piece.

I also thought that if that worked, I would create a similar mould for the bottom frame side of the part, and lay the brass/epoxy piece from step one into that, thus picking up that detail as well.

The part would then have the detail of the stryene piece on both sides and yet have the weight of the brass (or I could substitute lead I suppose) that was laid into it.

So, beyond the fact that it might be tricky to get the moulds just the right depth, why else won't this idea work?

Thanks for your thoughts. (Yes, I know I could hide weight in the underframe. That's the fall-back.)

Rob Kirkham
(Also in Vancouver, B.C.)


Re: Moving

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jon Miller" <atsf@...> wrote:

, including paint and paint thinners<
I think UPS will ship paint but who knows what shape it will be
in on
arrival. I've bought paint on ebay and that's how it arrived but
it's been
a year or so.

Jon Miller
Agreed. It has to go ground (no air) and they will charge you an extra
fee per parcel for all the haz-mat documentation that has to accompany
the shipment, but they'll ship it. Talk to them about packing it, they
have maximum size limits on any one parcel. If they will take five
gallons, brand new five gallon plastic pails from the local DIY home
center should work well, look for the commercial style with the lids
that need the slots cut for removal, and don't cut the slots. Pack
everything inside with plenty of bubble wrap and newspaper, then apply
the lid with a hammer. This should meet their requirement that the can
be sealed in such a fashion that it won't break open and leak. If your
stuff leaks inside, they'll say they're sorry, but if it breaks and
leaks on other shipments, YOU'LL be sorry. If shipping gallon metal
cans, you need to apply "can clips" which is something you'll never
find on a retail level.

By the way, try not to disclose the fact that these are OPEN
containers. This whole thing will go much better if they think they
are shipping factory sealed containers.

You could just pack it in the car and take it with you.

Dennis (who had to ship a whole PALLET of previously opened paint
once) Storzek


Re: Moving

Tim O'Connor
 

Ship it Roadway or another LTL company. They routinely
handle 'hazardous' cargo. I'm sure they'll have instructions
on how to pack the materials. Unlike UPS, Roadway does not
require that packages pass a "drop test" -- because they do
not use conveyors with drops. (I know from experience in
shipping fragile household goods from Texas to Massachusetts.)

Tim O'Connor

At 10/17/2007 10:47 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Hi,

Well, I'm moving. We've found a wonderful town, Pullman, Washington,
and rented a house with a BIG BASEMENT! Now we've started getting
everything else arranged and I've run into a list of forbidden items
for the movers, including paint and paint thinners. Like most of the
rest of you I've a collection of paint going back several decades, and
don't want to even begin thinking about starting anew. So, what have
the others on this list who have moved done? How did you get all your
stuff to the new address? I'm open to creative ideas, I just don't
want either a fine or jail time<g>.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Riverside, California (until January)

125841 - 125860 of 192760