Date   

Re: Main Line Models Stock Car

Steve SANDIFER
 

I think they were generic even though they had several paint schemes.
http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Mod/MainLine.htm

______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: parkvarieties
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, October 18, 2007 3:41 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Main Line Models Stock Car


Does anyone know if there is a specific prototype for the Main Line
Models 36' stock car kit that came out in the mid-1960's? I've
checked product reviews of the kit and none make any mention of
prototypes. Thanks.
Frank Brua


Scale Cars

John S. Frantz
 

Listers,

First off, this will be my first post. I joined this past week. Over the past two years I've narrowed down my modeling to a very specific area and era to the point I've been Ebaying what doesn't fit, and check build dates on cars. So my stats? I'm planning on modeling the PRR's Northern Central in the 1940's between York and New Freedom, and if room would permit, go as far North as York Haven and as far south as Blue Mount/White Hall, MD. The biggest steam engine allowed on the line due to curves was an L1s 2-8-2, though ironically the Centipedes ran on it when they were in passenger service. This is my ultimate goal, at this point I still live at home and i'm the ripe old age of 23. In addition to the PRR I really like the Wild Mary, Ma & PA and most other Eastern Roads.


So, now that that's out of the way. I was wondering if anybody has really pushed the envelope in modeling/operations when it comes to track scales/scale cars. Unfortunatey right now there are no scale car models out there, the Walthers still floats around but is only "eh" in my opinion. The Stewart Products kits can be found occasionally, and are the best, second only to the Hallmark and Overland renditions.

I'm wondering if naybody has modeled a scale car, and if so, with a scale house has used in model railroad operations for "checking" scales. Additionally, does anyone use a track scale as a fully-integrated part of operating and had cars "weighed" as part of the movement on a layout.

Any responses would be appreciated. Right now I'm working on some scale house modeling projects and was curious to see what others have done.

Thanks for any responses.

Best Regards,
John

York, PA


York, PA
Crossroads of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Maryland & Pennsylvania and Western Maryland Railroads.


Re: Brake Hoses

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

Doc,

I think you already have the answer to your quest in sight. You've
established a working relationship with Precision Scale Co. PSC will
quote custom casting from your patterns, or have patterns made to your
specs.

The most common style bracket I can think of is a piece of flat bar
stock with a bend at each end. One end has a pair of rivets that
attach it to the bottom of the car end, the other end has a pair of
nuts that hold the U bolt that captures the angle cock body on the
prototype. Should be a pretty simple pattern. I think I'd leave the U
bolt off and just rely on solder to hold the hose, or perhaps include
it to hold the acetal DA hoses, but the U bolt will have to be
oversize; I don't think they can cast .006" diameter sections in
brass. On the other end I'd add a BIG A$$ (that's a technical term,
folks) mounting pin, maybe .025" or .030" diameter and about .100"
long that can be glued into a hole drilled in the end of the car. The
pins would be the connection to the casting "tree" similar to NBW
castings.

The pattern needs to be brass, but you should only need one. They'll
replicate it numerous times via spin casting to produce the master for
a little tree, then make a rubber mold of the master tree to produce
the waxes for the production trees. Contract for a run, and your
problem is solved. Give them the rights to the pattern, and perhaps
they'll put it in their line and our problem will be solved, too.

Dennis


Re: Brake Hoses

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Jack Burgess responds to the problem of the fine
PSC brass brake hoses occasionally snapping off
at the valve during bending-

I wonder if anealing them first might help....?

I have been wondering the very same thing.
Perhaps Tony T. can comment when he returns from
out of town today or tomorrow.

Prior to Jack Burgess' comments, I also did not
know about the proper 30º clockwise rotation of
the valve. This alone would distinctly help in
the proper orientation of the hoses, but it also
poses an additional bend unless one could get
away by mounting the particular bracket on the carbody at 30º. (Naw-w-w).

We all separately get pretty picky (read:
compulsive/obsessive) about particular parts of
our prototype freight car modeling, and mine is
increasingly how the cars look from the ends
(thin wheels, scale couplers, scale width coupler
boxes, hoses, coupler bars, etc.) while other
parts that respected others consider equally
essential go begging! However, I consider this
particular issue as a blow toward the logical end
of how these fine cars can then also be added up
to make a TRAIN, certainly a goal in our hobby,
and the appearance of which, in toto and in part,
is indeed also worthy of the real thing.

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Air Hoses - what to do ---

rgspemkt@...
 

Following this thread with interest,?I'm just as hung up on the
subject(s) of air hoses and cut bars/levers as Denny and Jack.

I've been using (gasp) Detail Associates air hoses for quite
some time. Being that they are made from "engineering plastic",
I've found that holding a soldering iron close to the hose allows
for bending it slightly to?match?a more prototype appearance.

Of course, one can heat them too much, making them look like
a little black worm with an angle cock. <G>

As far as the mounting of the hoses at 30 degrees, I go along
with that. But, when I was a Special Agent (RR Police) with the
pre-merger Frisco, I used to do a lot of study of the finer details
when possible. I didn't take very many photos of stuff, as my
position with the company would cause the crews to get worked
up if they saw a special agent walking around taking pictures.

Back to the subject at hand --- many cars that I saw, after some
time in use, were amazing in that the cut levers/bars and hose
brackets were pretty much "all over the place".

There were so many "jury rigged" contraptions and bailing wire
and spit fabrications holding this stuff together.

Usually, IIRC, the hose brackets were pretty "floppy". and many
times the angle cock had been turned around a little, here and there,
that uniformity was the exception rather than the rule.

I made friends with a number of the car knockers, a couple of
them were covert model railroaders, and we would discuss
these matters. <G>

I recall one tri-level auto rack and its "trombone slide"
cut lever. You wouldn't believe, and I wish I had a photo, how
this thing had been patched back together, several times, with
a couple of pieces of angle and bar/strap stock and a whole lot
of creative welding.?

It barely would move and it looked as if, when given a good tug,
it would fall off yet again. But, it headed off to Rose Lake from
Ewing Ave., yard in the next cut out, with my car man friend
shaking his head.

No "Bad Order" on that type of stuff, just let it go to the next
carrier and hope it falls off on foreign track.

Back to modeling. One thing that bugs me is that most HO
air hoses have the angle cock turned "open". I've tried slicing
the handle off the HO hoses and re-applying them in the
closed position, especially on passenger cars that I know
I'll want on the end of a train, ATSF Rider Cars specifically.

One of the most remarkable things I've seen is what Dave Davis
has done. He made a little punch in the form of a glad hand and
punches them from thin kitchen magnets. Then he uses the
no-sag thread from Walthers High Tension Tower kits to make
the hose. With the magnet on one end, and the other end of the
hose ACC'd to the angle cock, the hose hangs down at
Denny's prototype angle. But, when the cars are being coupled,
the magnets attract each other and, as if by magic, the
hoses couple by themselves, yielding a prototype appearance
as the train passes by.

Finally, I've drawn and laser cut a little air hose bracket I use
on my freight cars. The hole in it is sized to accept the DA
hose casting, even with the misalignment in the casting caused
by die slippage. It's just a little tab (.0156" thick) that glues to
the back of the end sill and holds the hose pipe in place.

This eliminates the necessity of other types of brackets, or the
big glob of glue needed to hold them in place.

It's simple and unobtrusive. It follows the philosophy of,
if you can't render it properly in scale, then it's best to
leave it off so it doesn't attract negative attention. <G>

I could go on, and on, with this but I have to get working.

John


John Hitzeman
President/Owner
American Model Builders, Inc.
Our 25th Year!!
LASERkit (tm)
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Re: Car travel

jonespwr
 

--- In STMFC@..., Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...> wrote:

Posted by: "Russ Strodtz" I'd like to make a few commnets on
Russ's post based on my recollections from the 60's when I was
involved with car distribution.
===================

> Rob, The flat statement was made that these cars were sent
loaded or empty
back to Canada. I responded that that was not always the case and if
it was some kind of rule how was it implemented or enforced.
........


In my experience, use of waybills for empty general service cars
was the exception on most railroads. Usually such cars were moved in
accordance with car distribution orders on each railroad. There were
general CD orders that said what to do with each kind of empty, by
type and subtype and marks. The order might say to home route all
surplus cars of a type or a group of marks. The only time a memo bill
would be needed would be for an indirect connection car moving on
record rights to indicate the off-line juntion for that car. BTW,
suhc bills were not waybills in the legal sense, except for special
equipment governed by CSD's. We called the memo bills. They might be
simply an IBM card or other piece of paper that would be included in a
stack of real waybills.

From what I have seen empty cars were not accompanied by a waybill,
but by a card form. Maine Central called them Card Manifest for Empty
Car. The ones I have copies of come in a pad of 8 1/2 by 5 1/4 card
stock and contain all (most?) of the details on the routing of the car
to its home point.


Re: Brake Hoses

Charles Hladik
 

List,
At one time I too had these brake/air hose problems, I started using PSC
valves and the insulation of from micro bulbs (or whatever is scale
appropriate) along with PSC glad hands. Heck the insulation acts like rubber/vinyl
because it is. They don't break, they droop and are quite flexible.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division



************************************** See what's new at http://www.aol.com


Re: Brake Hoses

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Denny wrote:
Over the years, I have schizophrenic about brake hoses. If they come
with the kit, I put them on, if they do not, or are not mentioned in
the instructions (surprising how many do not even today), I may not
install them, perhaps being secretly pleased to be spared a
perceived futile chore.
I hear you there...and uncoupler bars are in the same category. However, now
that I have enough cars to operate, future builds will include both
details....<g>

Well, try replicating this appearance with the plastic hoses-
sometimes you can get there almost, but usually not even close (in
this regard, one will have an easier time with hoses alongside
couplers with excessive striker/striker distance). In
contradistinction the brass hoses can be bent to order, replicating
the normal repose of the prototype brake hose.
I had not realized until a few years ago that brake hoses/valves are to be
mounted at 30 degrees clockwise from 90 degrees until a YV
brakeman/modeler/draftsman told me that after checking some of my YV
equipment drawings (check the Builder's Cycs).

Working with the brass hoses has not been all sunshine and roses.
They are very delicate, and although they will undergo the bending
that you want (and look great!), they will also snap off at the
valve, unless you are very, very careful.
I wonder if anealing them first might help....?

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Brake Hoses

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

For me, two of the great breakthroughs in the past few years in HO prototype scale freight car/train modeling have been the introduction of and the ensuing spread of more near-scale width .088" wheels, and the introduction of scale sized couplers that are both housed in near-scale sized coupler boxes, and perhaps best of all, allowing for the first time actual scale interval-distances between coupled cars (coupled Accumate Proto and Kadee #153 couplers- either/or- allow prototype normal striker/striker distances of 29-31", the Accumate slightly better in this regard). For many of us who are busy adapting these new advances, we are at the same time also discarding the magnetic glad hands- largely for terrific out-of-scale appearance reasons discussed here in the past, and inappropriate detailing.

BUT: As we admire and perhaps salivate (not me, but others who I will not embarrass) as a really neat cut of so-equipped handsome cars rolls by (read: a really good looking TRAIN), there is something wrong: Under our new closely-coupled cars, and beneath our scale sized locked couplers is now.......nothing, nothing at all in a location where on every legitimate train we have ever observed at lineside should be- locked brake hoses. Brake hoses are small, but they are visible!

Over the years, I have schizophrenic about brake hoses. If they come with the kit, I put them on, if they do not, or are not mentioned in the instructions (surprising how many do not even today), I may not install them, perhaps being secretly pleased to be spared a perceived futile chore.

Although I started 50 years ago with coarse A-C brake hoses made of small-wire insulation, plastic hoses came along at a fairly early date, and the latter have remained about the only type available. Some brass hoses have been produced by several suppliers, but on price alone these have been largely relegated to the brass market.

Well, over the years many, and probably most of my operating cars with such brake hoses lose them- broken all off in routine handling . The hoses litter the layout- Kadee, CalScale, Intermountain, Branchline- you name it. Sometimes its just the hose, sometimes the delicate bracket lies right there with it. Frustratingly, most of these hoses cannot be replaced on the model because the flimsy bracket has been destroyed or made unusable in the process, and replacement is a total pain. Very commonly, the hoses do not even last through the construction process- they litter the modeling bench instead.

After a lot of to-ing and fro-ing, I decided on "no more plastic brake hoses", only brass. Well, easier said than done, with sky high prices and no hobby supplier carrying them in sufficient numbers, if any at all. After some investigation, I learned that I could purchase the hoses in bulk quantity much cheaper from PSC (cast in Montana), and from Bowser (cast in China- in episodic batches). Although the terms were different, the end price was about the same, and I chose PSC "made in USA" (it was also much quicker- weeks instead of months).

Well, the packet of 50 shots of brass brake hoses, 12/shot. arrived (it was feather weight), and I have diligently working with and mounting these hoses on a backlog of cars.

Most plastic and brass HO air hoses stand out straight out from the valve at an angle outward, and also toward the center, and that is what I mostly see on otherwise fine models (including my own). Of course, these hoses never looked like this. Prototype hoses were flexible rubber with a heavy metal glad hand coupling on the end that pulled the hose into a curve with the end almost vertical to the ground- but not quite. The coupled hose also angled sharply toward the middle to couple with its companion from the next car, which caused the hose to assume a somewhat curled appearance with a compound S curve at the very end where the glad hands coupled. Even in the uncoupled state, the glad hand generally would not stick out further than somewhat less than the pulling face of the coupler.

Well, try replicating this appearance with the plastic hoses- sometimes you can get there almost, but usually not even close (in this regard, one will have an easier time with hoses alongside couplers with excessive striker/striker distance). In contradistinction the brass hoses can be bent to order, replicating the normal repose of the prototype brake hose.

At present, I am installing brass hoses much as I did plastic ones: using whatever brackets I can scrounge up- all plastic. The only ones commonly available are the Kadee's. They are very nice, honored by a very long production run (1959?), but as Tim O'Connor pointed out about a year ago, they are of an unusual type commonly used on log cars (which I believe is what Kadee used them for). However, you use what you have, and several resin kits from respected purveyors include them in their kits, even though it is doubtful from the evidence that the cars had anything like them to begin with.

We have a great need for after-market brake hose brackets that can be mounted in a substantial manner- of at least several different types.

Working with the brass hoses has not been all sunshine and roses. They are very delicate, and although they will undergo the bending that you want (and look great!), they will also snap off at the valve, unless you are very, very careful. What does careful mean?

1) Use the right tool. I use a pair of needle nose pliers with fully-rounded tapered jaws. Bending the hose over a sharp edge courts disaster.

2) Move very slowly. Although Tony T. will correct me and my un-sophistication in this regard, my thought has always been than in bending brass, moving slowly allows the molecules, etc. time to readjust to the new circumstances, whereas a fast move does not and a fracture occurs :-).

3) I mount the hoses with Barge cement, particularly in the existing hole in the bracket is larger than the "brake line hose"/handle of the hose (very common). This gives a very tough but flexible joint that I hope will withstand some bumps.

It is truly neat to observe a rolling string of nice detailed and weathered close coupled cars, all with quite visible and obvious brake hoses curling down and under the locked couplers, for all the world appearing to grasp its partner hose from the next car- uh-h -just like the real ones!.

Denny



The


--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


Re: 60250-60499 Series 52' Flatcar - Build Date 1936

Jay Bingham <j.bingham@...>
 

Thanks.

Jay Bingham


Jay. the trucks were AAR self-aligning spring-plankless double truss
with five-spring clusters. Closest HO scale truck in appearance is
the
Proto 2000 AAR truck. Hand brakes were of drop-shaft variety similar
to, if not the same as, those on the Proto 2000 flat car models.

Richard Hendrickson


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: MAINE ''SPUD'' CARS( BAR/MEC ) & NH

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Oops I missed the RW&B part of Marty's email. Sorry the photo I referenced
was of the older cars.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: MAINE ''SPUD'' CARS( BAR/MEC ) & NH

Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

The reason there is no RW&B is none of the BAR reefers carried this
scheme, only the RBs which
probably were of little use in California traffic. This may have been
the reason the blue and white scheme with the brown spud
on the older wooden cars didn't last long but were repainted orange.
All of the new purchased cars came in the orange
scheme

Roger Hinman

On Oct 20, 2007, at 11:19 AM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Marty wrote:
I've hear for years about the "B&A reefers running in the off
season"
out in California but have never seen a lot of photographic evidence
of B&A cars in service out West. Surely, someone would have spent a
frame or two on a red, white, and blue car in a sea of reefer yellow
and orange??????
Top photo on page 389 of the PFE book.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY



Re: Car travel

Russ Strodtz <railfreightcars@...>
 

Chuck,

They were used on local orders. Just considered as part of the general
pool of empty 40' cars. They had no different status then any other 40'
box car. If there was a greater need somewhere else that's where they
went.

In the case of the glass plants at Streator IL they were served by more
than one road so the loads that came your way may have not been cars
you supplied. As long as they had a steady supply of empties it did not
matter to the shippers who either owned or supplied the cars. In the
case of a small elevator that only loaded about a dozen cars a week they
just took what they got.

Saw a list recently where the yard had written right on the consist provided
the Conductor what the elevators on his route had ordered. It amounted to
like 10 cars. Trouble is he was only given 3 empty box cars. Have no idea
how he set his priorities. The next day he might have 15.

Car supply was a constant ebb and flow between being short on cars to
having too many.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: <RUTLANDRS@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, 17 October, 2007 19:04
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Car travel


Russ,
If the cars were not returned "loaded or empty", what was their status.
Chuck Hladik




Brass Castings From Plastic

rgspemkt@...
 

Rob,

David Braun, formerly of PSC, now owns The Back Shop
and does brass investment casting from plastic masters.

He has a complete site with lots of stuff on it, but also
has a page that answers a lot of questions on the process
used to convert plastic patterns to brass castings.

It's very informative.

Go to;
http://home.onemain.com/~thebackshop/plastics.htm


I haven't been able to get it to open this afternoon,
but at about 1:00 AM this morning, it worked fine.

You can also try "googling" this;
Making Brass Parts from Plastics

K&D Castings does not have a web site that I've been able to
find, but I do have their phone number and the owners name.
I'll provide that off list.

John

John Hitzeman
President/Owner
American Model Builders, Inc.
Our 25th Year!!
LASERkit (tm)
www.rgspemkt.com
www.ambstlouis.net
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Re: DS/SS split 1945 MILW help needed

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Thank you very much, Richard.

Here are the revised percentages and numbers for the Milwaukee, with
Richard Hendrickson's data included:

Sheathing type for box and auto cars, MILW, January 1945:
MILW_____%____Number
DS_____16.8%____5,393
SS_____61.5%____19,759
Steel_____21.6%____6,945
Known_____100.0%____32,097
Unknown_____0.0%____6
Total_____100.0%____32,103

Numbers for January 1945, April 1949, and July 1950:
MILW_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____5,393____225_____71
SS_____19,759____18,000_____17,406
Steel_____6,945____13,244_____14,493
Other_____0____0_____0
Unknown_____6____1_____1
Total_____32,103____31,470_____31,971

Thanks again and best wishes,
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


Re: DS/SS split 1945 MILW help needed

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 13, 2007, at 10:05 AM, laramielarry wrote:

There are a large number of cars in 1945 whose sheathing type is
Unknown at present, but regardless of their classification, it is
apparent that the MILW underwent a huge transition from 1945 to 1950,
slashing 99% of its DS fleet, doubling its steel fleet and trimming
over 2,300 of its SS cars. Most or all of the added steel cars were
rib-sided (7,307 minimum).

Here is a listing of most of the unknowns, all of which are described
in the ORER as "Steel Underframe".

Note that all of the dimensions in the following series are
identical; all other MILW cars with these dimensions are double
sheathed.
Road, AAR, Kind, Series, IL, IH, Door, Capy, Qty 1945, Qty 1950
MILW, XM, Box, 81482-81998, 41'0", 8'8", 5'6", 80000, 32, NA
MILW, XM, Box, 82736-83480, 41'0", 8'8", 5'6", 80000, 56, NA
MILW, XM, Box, 84000-87480, 41'0", 8'8", 5'6", 80000, 386, NA
All three series were double wood sheathed with Bettendorf underframe
and wood ends, built in 1907.

MILW, XM, Box, 206500-206500, 41'0", 8'8", 5'6", 80000, 1, NA
MILW, XM, Box, 208100-208178, 41'0", 8'8", 5'6", 80000, 52, NA
MILW, XM, Box, 208200-208862, 41'0", 8'8", 5'6", 80000, 200, 18
MILW, XM, Box, 208900-209260, 41'0", 8'8", 5'6", 80000, 0, 4
All were cars of the same design as the three series above except that
they were built as auto cars with 9'6" wide door openings and, in some
cases, wood full height-and-width A-end doors, later converted with the
end doors and auxiliary side doors either removed or secured shut.

These are also likely to be DS:
Road, AAR, Kind, Series, IL, IH, Door, Capy, Qty 1945, Qty 1950
MILW, XAB, Auto, 206200-206499, 40'9", 8'8", 10'0", 80000, 14, NA
MILW, XM, Box, 206200-206499, 40'9", 8'8", 9'0", 80000, 6, NA
MILW, XAB, Auto, 206200-206499, 40'6", 8'8", 10'0", 80000, 31, NA
MILW, XM, Box, 206200-206499, 40'6", 8'8", 9'0", 80000, 9, NA
As above but with the original 1-1/2 doors still functional. Built ca.
1909-'10.

If anyone knows whether these Unknowns are DS, SS, Steel, or
rebuilds, I would appreciate that information. Build or rebuild
dates would also be useful.
Richard Hendrickson


Re: 60250-60499 Series 52' Flatcar - Build Date 1936

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 19, 2007, at 6:16 PM, Jay Bingham wrote:

I have completed building four of the above series cars from the
Northern Specific kit, except that I have not added trucks or brake
wheels. Could someone advise as to the prototype truck and the
prototype style of brake wheel.
Jay. the trucks were AAR self-aligning spring-plankless double truss
with five-spring clusters. Closest HO scale truck in appearance is the
Proto 2000 AAR truck. Hand brakes were of drop-shaft variety similar
to, if not the same as, those on the Proto 2000 flat car models.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: MAINE ''SPUD'' CARS( BAR/MEC ) & NH

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Marty,

Not quite west >>Albany GA to Boston LA << LOL !!!!

Fred Freitas
who grew up watching 4-6-4T's and other steam power in Beacon Park Yard

cvsne <mjmcguirk@...> wrote:
No, I meant, and quite deliberately chose, "B&A" -- as any good New Englander will tell you!!!

"Boston & Albany", hmmm, that's one of those western railroads, isn't it?????

Marty


Re: B&LE hopper trucks

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 20, 2007, at 10:38 AM, Bud Rindfleisch wrote:

Thanks again Richard! Now my next question, what did you use for the
B&LE hopper?
That's easy. In HO scale, the old Ulrich cast metal triple hopper kits
were exact replicas of the B&LE 70 and 90 ton hopper cars.

Richard Hendrickson


DS/SS split 1945-1950; IC, NP, MP

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Hi Folks

Here are the DS/SS/Steel splits for box and auto cars in interchange
service on the IC, NP, and MP for January 1945, April 1949, and July
1950.


Illinois Central:
IC_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____1,098____153_____65
SS_____9,325____9,026_____8,362
Steel_____8,745____12,465_____12,441
Unknown_____10____0_____0
Total_____19,178____21,644_____20,868


Northern Pacific:
NP_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____11,850____7,728_____7,004
SS_____4,422____4,389_____4,378
Steel_____4,980____7,480_____8,172
Unknown_____0____0_____0
Total_____21,252____19,597_____19,554


Missouri Pacific (MP reporting marks only)
MP_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____1,689____1,166_____1,041
SS_____11,970____11,861_____11,828
Steel_____3,581____5,156_____5,150
Unknown_____53____9_____9
Total_____17,293____18,192_____18,028

Missouri Pacific (Includes I-GN, MO-IL, MP, NOT&M, SB&M, and T&P)
MP+_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____3,028____2,295_____2,028
SS_____16,357____16,078_____15,631
Steel_____6,530____9,716_____9,876
Unknown_____53____9_____9
Total_____25,968____28,098_____27,544


Best wishes,
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming

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