Date   

Re: Cullet

Dave Nelson
 

MOFWCABOOSE@AOL.COM wrote:
I don't know about the 1940s, but I remember seeing a photo article
in Popular Science sometime in the early 1950s depicting a cullet
plant, in California I believe, showing how the stuff was crushed,
metals removed, and then the glass was washed and tumbled to remove
sharp edges, picked over by hand to remove any foreign objects the
magnets had missed, and finally loaded into hopper cars or trucks.

Here in central California there were several glass container plants in
Oakland, no doubt providing some combination of packing jars, beverage
bottles, and ordinary table glassware, all of which would have found ready
markets very close at hand. There isn't any suitable sand anywhere nearby
tho... the closest that I know of was very fine beach sand near Monterey...
quite a ways to be shipping sand. So my guess is they used a lot of cullet,
which would have been fairly easy to come by in an urban area.

I wonder if that was par-for-the-course in cities that lacked the right
quality sand?

============

A story about cullet that I read somewhere: A local glass installation
company, Cobbledick-Kibbe (C-K), provided plate and window glass to large
office buildings under construction in San Francisco and neighboring cities.
Somehow the Western Pacific convinced C-K to try their service (instead of
just SP all of the time) and receive the glass at the WP depot in Oakland.
But there was some reason why DF boxcars wouldn't work, so WP specified the
large plate glass be carefully loaded and shipped in gondolas (covered w/
canvas); on arrival in Oakland, C-K inspectors pulled back the canvas and
found all 4 gons filled w/ cullet. Needless to say, C-K continued to do
business with the SP.

Dave Nelson


Re: Builder information on D&M X128-129

Charles Hladik
 

Mike,
If all else fails, you might try the guys at Cooper and Oshtemo
Locomotive Works, _www.locomotiveworks.com_ (http://www.locomotiveworks.com) , they
do a lot of Michigan freight car paint schemes.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division



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Re: Mineral Stock piles WasRe: Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

Richard Townsend
 

I remember living on the New Cumberland (Pa.) General Depot (an army logistics facility) around the time of?cut off date for this list?where there were small stockpiles of chromium ore and other minerals adjacent to some of the railroad tracks on the facility.? The stockpiles were carefully labeled with the type of the ore and where it came from.? I specifically remember chromium ore from the USSR.? We kids had free and easy access to these stockpiles, and as a result I had some unusual ores in my childhood rock collection.?







Richard Townsend

Lincoln City, Oregon










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Carmer cut levers

Eric Hansmann
 

I received Railroad Prototype Cyc #16 recently and have been enjoying the USRA double-sheathed
boxcar overview. I note these cars were built with Carmer Cut Levers. I know many of the USRA
single-sheathed cars also came with Carmer Cut Levers. Was the same Carmer design applied to
both the DS and SS USRA boxcars?

For that matter, was the same Carmer design applied to all as-built USRA cars?

I know the PRR has some slight differences in Carmer designs between classes. As the Carmer Cut
Levers were a two-part system, some handles were slightly different from application to
application, as were some of the pin-pulling levers. This spurs the query if there were any
differences in the Carmer designs between the different USRA freight cars, especially since the
USRA cars ushered in some standardization in the components of freight car constuction.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.


Re: B&LE hopper trucks

Bill Navari
 

I did a special run of this car in two schemes, the as-built 1952 and the
1964 repaint. Both in the Stewart kit. Nobody that I know of makes these trucks
at this time, although the Ulrich cars, I believe, had them.

Bill Navari
Bessemer Hobbies
bessemerhobbies@aol.com

_http://cgi.ebay.com/12PK-B-LE-STEWART-70-TON-OFFSET-HOPPERS-1964-REPAINT_W0QQ
itemZ330181376395QQihZ014QQcategoryZ38277QQcmdZViewItem?refid=store_
(http://cgi.ebay.com/12PK-B-LE-STEWART-70-TON-OFFSET-HOPPERS-1964-REPAINT_W0QQitemZ3301
81376395QQihZ014QQcategoryZ38277QQcmdZViewItem?refid=store)



_http://stores.ebay.com/BESSEMER-HOBBIES_W0QQsspagenameZMEQ3aFQ3aSTQQtZkm&refi
d=store_
(http://stores.ebay.com/BESSEMER-HOBBIES_W0QQsspagenameZMEQ3aFQ3aSTQQtZkm&refid=store)






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Cullet again

Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@...>
 

Kalmback published "More Railroads You can Model", edited by Mike Schafer, in 1978. One of the articles was "Milwaukee Road's Beer Line" and a picture of an open hopper under the cullet shute at the new Schlitz bottling plant appears on page 48. The plant went into operation in early 1959, so it's just under the wire for the list. The photo is 1970s, but I'd guess cullet was a big product at the start of operations. Normally, one car was loaded per week, and during the summer, up to two cars per week were shipped to Chicago for recycling the broken glass. Another source for this information is "The Milwaukee Road's Beer Line" by Art Harnack, published as Special Publication Number 5 by the Milwaukee Road Historical Association.
Regards,
Norm Larkin


C&O Cars; Was "Hmmm"

Bill Darnaby
 

Beware of the F&C C&O 40' auto car. I tried to assemble one this summer and, thinking it didn't look right, found it to be 6" too short in height and put it away unassembled.

Bill Darnaby


No as to ancestry. F&C molded the original cars from Yankee
Clipper
masters and later made them part of their own line of kits. Yankee
Clipper did not become F&C.

Dick

On Oct 25, 2007, at 4:34 PM, boyds1949 wrote:


Yankee Clipper (now F&C) made models of the C&O cars.

John King




glass cullet in hoppers, out of era.

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Russ didn't seem to make this clear, but you shouldn't be moving crushed glass in happers until after glass recycling got to large enough volumes, way out of the era of this list. I can tell you where it's shipped in New England - ask the question on the OPSIG list.


Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Concerning car travel" including strays"

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Posted by: "George" I remember running upon a NKP hopper in southwest Virginia on a N&W
branch back in the nineteen seventies. This was following the merger
of the two roads. Kinda limits us steam era to Alton hoppers in
Mississippi and Pere Marquette in Virginia I suppose. More?
George Courtney
====================

You're not limited in the sense of not using the car at all. Almost any single hopper car can be seen on any railroad within reasonable distance of the owner. The limitation is that the less probable marks be a small proportion of your total hoppers.


Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

Gatwood, Elden J SAD <Elden.J.Gatwood@...>
 

Rich;



Thanks for confirming that. Do you know what specific ores or minerals they
got at that site?



You are right about Westinghouse. They did get shipments, but I don't know
if you knew what they did at that site. It was some super-secret facility
involved in the nuclear sub effort, and I also understand perhaps nuclear
space applications, also (The Astro Nuclear Lab). Because it was so
secretive, I have been unable to even obtain any info as to what they might
have shipped in and out of there. It was originally the distilling facility
for Large Whiskey, later bought by Overholt; Westinghouse went in there and
bought the site sometime in the early 60's (my modeling period). I wish I
knew more about it.



Thanks for verifying the use of that site?



BTW, other than a little shack they had to house the guards, was there
anything else about the site you remember?



Thanks,



Elden











________________________________

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
SUVCWORR@aol.com
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2007 1:07 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"




Elden:

Yes, that was the site.? It was in Large, PA.? At the time I was there, the
tracks ended not much farther up the creek.? There was a Westinghouse
facility on Rt. 51 in Large behind the Eat n Park that was also actively
receiving cars at that time (late 70's).?

Since it stockpile sat next to the creek and was surrounded by swamp land, we
monitored the site for heavy metals runoff as well as treating the swamp for
all the mosquitoes which could be found there.?

Rich Orr

Was that on the old Peters Creek Branch up the Mon? Just north of Clairton?
Or someplace else? There was a strategic stockpile up there for a while. It
was probably one of the only reasons they kept that branch open as long as it
was.

Besides molybdenum, I think they also stockpiled chromium, manganese,
tungsten, cobalt, columbium, and nickel, in different locations, during the
Cold War panic about the availability of certain "critical" metals for
military use. Since they were so secret, it is funny that you not only knew
about it, but were let on site.

Thanks for the story!

-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <Elden.J.Gatwood@sad01.usace.army.mil
<mailto:Elden.J.Gatwood%40sad01.usace.army.mil> >
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, 29 Oct 2007 7:07 am
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

Rich;

Was that on the old Peters Creek Branch up the Mon? Just north of Clairton?
Or someplace else? There was a strategic stockpile up there for a while. It
was probably one of the only reasons they kept that branch open as long as it
was.

Besides molybdenum, I think they also stockpiled chromium, manganese,
tungsten, cobalt, columbium, and nickel, in different locations, during the
Cold War panic about the availability of certain "critical" metals for
military use. Since they were so secret, it is funny that you not only knew
about it, but were let on site.

Thanks for the story!

Oh,. and on the original subject on what was in those hoppers, limestone was
probably the other one of the "big three" minerals being shipped in open
hoppers. I obtained a copy of a report on how much was being shipped in
hoppers, since there was a hopper shortage in the early 60's, and they cited
some figures that showed what was being shipped. I suspect they did not
distinguish between limestone and dolomite, since they were both used in the
furnaces and looked somewhat similar, but dolomite came from different
sources, so would matter if you model a particular area.

Elden Gatwood

________________________________

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of
SUVCWORR@aol.com <mailto:SUVCWORR%40aol.com>
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2007 11:50 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

In a message dated 10/26/2007 11:40:24 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
Carrock1998@aol.com <mailto:Carrock1998%40aol.com>
<mailto:Carrock1998%40aol.com> writes:

know that molybdium (sp?) is a really weird spelling---there is a chemical

I put in my salt water fish tank that contains that. Didn't know though
that it was of a nature to be able to be shipped in a hopper. Guess I got
an
avenue to do some more researching.
The only reason I know about the moly is the DOD had a strategic stockpile
outside Pittsburgh until the mills closed. the site was located on a branck
of
the PRR. Several times, I watched them unload hoppers of the stuff there.
The guards were friendly and told me what it was. Guess the fact I was in a
uniform and had to do site inspections for the Health Department loosened
their
tongues a bit.

Rich Orr

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Mineral Stock piles WasRe: Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 10/29/2007 2:26:52 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
Elden.J.Gatwood@sad01.usace.army.mil writes:

Thanks for confirming that. Do you know what specific ores or minerals they
got at that site?



You are right about Westinghouse. They did get shipments, but I don't know
if you knew what they did at that site. It was some super-secret facility
involved in the nuclear sub effort, and I also understand perhaps nuclear
space applications, also (The Astro Nuclear Lab). Because it was so
secretive, I have been unable to even obtain any info as to what they might
have shipped in and out of there. It was originally the distilling facility
for Large Whiskey, later bought by Overholt; Westinghouse went in there and
bought the site sometime in the early 60's (my modeling period). I wish I
knew more about it.




Elden:

The only ores we tested for were Chromium, Zinc and Molybdenum. So I would
think they were the only ones stored there. When the Homestead Works of US
Steel closed the site was closed.

You are correct the Westinghouse facility was a nuclear research center. It
was connect with the Navy's Bettis Atomic research Facility in West Mifflin.
They were the only sites in the county we could not access.

Rich

Rich



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Tovrea Packing Co. reefers

SUVCWORR@...
 

There has been a discussion on the Railway Bullshippers group concerning the cars owned by the Tovrea Packing Co. of Phoenix, AZ.? They used the reporting marks TOVX from 1932 - 1938.? No one has sucessfully identified what type reefer or manufacture of these cars.? I don't have access to any of the appropriate ORER's to even begin to describe them.

Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.

Rich Orr

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Re: Cullet

drgwrail
 

Not steam era but to show the sue of hopper cars.....

The bottle producing plant next to the Coors brewery in Golden CO
gets about 6 hopper cars of "cullet" a week. Don't know where it
comes from but it is shipped in NS conventional open top coal hoppers.

Cullet was also shipped from Oneonta in specal service fishbelly twin
hoppers painted blue.

Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, MOFWCABOOSE@... wrote:

I don't know about the 1940s, but I remember seeing a photo article
in
Popular Science sometime in the early 1950s depicting a cullet
plant, in California
I believe, showing how the stuff was crushed, metals removed, and
then the
glass was washed and tumbled to remove sharp edges, picked over by
hand to remove
any foreign objects the magnets had missed, and finally loaded into
hopper
cars or trucks.

I suspect that any coloring agents would have been removed when the
cullet
was melted in the furnaces, much as carbon and trace additives are
removed when
scrap iron and steel are melted...the additives unite with the
limestone to
form slag, which is removed, thus leaving pure iron.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL


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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

I'm suprised that no one has mentioned construction aggregates (sand, stone and gravel) as one of the major uses of hopper cars.

The Norflok Southern had a large hopper fleet, and its main use was construction aggregates. Nearly all class 1 railroads had on-line quarries. B&M is another that comes to mind on which the large on-line hopper loading was aggregates.

You can have just about any mark hauling this on your model railroad as long as you are within a few hundred miles of the loading point and there is a reasonable likelihood of that mark being at the loading point. C411 cars (N&W, C&O, etc.) are of course excluded from this unless the origin os on those roads.



Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Posted by: "Ljack70117@comcast.net" When I was on the RRs the only Bauxite I ever saw was loaded in Box
cars.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
==============

On the NYC we moved a lot of bauxite from the Port of New York to Massena in covered hoppers. This was in the early 60's, but I don't think it was a new practice then - but only in the winter when the seaway was closed.


Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

SUVCWORR@...
 

Elden:



Yes, that was the site.? It was in Large, PA.? At the time I was there, the tracks ended not much farther up the creek.? There was a Westinghouse facility on Rt. 51 in Large behind the Eat n Park that was also actively receiving cars at that time (late 70's).?

Since it stockpile sat next to the creek and was surrounded by swamp land, we monitored the site for heavy metals runoff as well as treating the swamp for all the mosquitoes which could be found there.?



Rich Orr



Was that on the old Peters Creek Branch up the Mon? Just north of Clairton?
Or someplace else? There was a strategic stockpile up there for a while. It
was probably one of the only reasons they kept that branch open as long as it
was.



Besides molybdenum, I think they also stockpiled chromium, manganese,
tungsten, cobalt, columbium, and nickel, in different locations, during the
Cold War panic about the availability of certain "critical" metals for
military use. Since they were so secret, it is funny that you not only knew
about it, but were let on site.



Thanks for the story!

-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <Elden.J.Gatwood@sad01.usace.army.mil>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, 29 Oct 2007 7:07 am
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"



Rich;



Was that on the old Peters Creek Branch up the Mon? Just north of Clairton?
Or someplace else? There was a strategic stockpile up there for a while. It
was probably one of the only reasons they kept that branch open as long as it
was.



Besides molybdenum, I think they also stockpiled chromium, manganese,
tungsten, cobalt, columbium, and nickel, in different locations, during the
Cold War panic about the availability of certain "critical" metals for
military use. Since they were so secret, it is funny that you not only knew
about it, but were let on site.



Thanks for the story!



Oh,. and on the original subject on what was in those hoppers, limestone was
probably the other one of the "big three" minerals being shipped in open
hoppers. I obtained a copy of a report on how much was being shipped in
hoppers, since there was a hopper shortage in the early 60's, and they cited
some figures that showed what was being shipped. I suspect they did not
distinguish between limestone and dolomite, since they were both used in the
furnaces and looked somewhat similar, but dolomite came from different
sources, so would matter if you model a particular area.



Elden Gatwood





________________________________

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
SUVCWORR@aol.com
Sent: Friday, October 26, 2007 11:50 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"



In a message dated 10/26/2007 11:40:24 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
Carrock1998@aol.com <mailto:Carrock1998%40aol.com> writes:

know that molybdium (sp?) is a really weird spelling---there is a chemical

I put in my salt water fish tank that contains that. Didn't know though
that it was of a nature to be able to be shipped in a hopper. Guess I got
an
avenue to do some more researching.
The only reason I know about the moly is the DOD had a strategic stockpile
outside Pittsburgh until the mills closed. the site was located on a branck
of
the PRR. Several times, I watched them unload hoppers of the stuff there.
The guards were friendly and told me what it was. Guess the fact I was in a
uniform and had to do site inspections for the Health Department loosened
their
tongues a bit.

Rich Orr

**************************************
See what's new at
http://www.aol.com <http://www.aol.com>












Yahoo! Groups Links





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Re: NKP hoppers

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Ed and friends,

It is beyond our time period, but when I first moved to Virginia in 1982, NKP triple hoppers were very common in N&W trains. I photographed several, and saw many more. They were in generally deplorable condition, often with "straw doors" blocking large holes in the sheathing. Often they had very little lettering left, and it sometimes looked like what was there had been applied by a drunk using a large paint brush. By contrast, there were still a lot of Virginia cars around, and they seemed to be in excellent condition. The N&W cars were all in good shape too.

In deference to Mike Brock, let me point out that all these NKP and VGN cars, plus many of the N&W ones I saw, were steam-era survivors.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

ed_mines wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "George" <gsc3@...> wrote:

I remember running upon a NKP hopper in southwest Virginia on a N&W branch back in the nineteen seventies. This was following the merger of the two roads.
There are a lot of photos including an NKP composite hopper on the CNJ in a CNJ steam - color photo book.

Captions in a NKP publicity photo book said that most coal on the NKP was moved in C&O hoppers. My assumption was that the NKPs own hoppers were used to ship company coal. (The book's captions have been criticized in this forum before).

Maybe the NKP leased or sold some of their hoppers when diesels took over.

Ed Mines



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Re: Car travel of hoppers including "strays"

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Russ Strodtz" <railfreightcars@...>
wrote:
You can add glass cullet, esentially broken bottles.
WAs glass being recycled in the '40s?

I thought it would be cheaper to make glass using raw materials. Scrap
glass could be different colors .....

Ed


NKP hoppers

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "George" <gsc3@...> wrote:
I remember running upon a NKP hopper in southwest Virginia on a N&W
branch back in the nineteen seventies. This was following the merger
of the two roads.
There are a lot of photos including an NKP composite hopper on the CNJ
in a CNJ steam - color photo book.

Captions in a NKP publicity photo book said that most coal on the NKP
was moved in C&O hoppers. My assumption was that the NKPs own hoppers
were used to ship company coal. (The book's captions have been
criticized in this forum before).

Maybe the NKP leased or sold some of their hoppers when diesels took
over.

Ed Mines


Re: L.V. Well car #9952

coronadoscalemodels
 

If someone wishes to see in service shots of LV #9952, then look in the
book "UINTAH RY. PICTORIAL" Vol. 1, by Rodger Polley (Sundance Pub.)
When the 3 foot gauge Uintah Ry. #50 2-6-6-2T was delivered from BLW in
Philadelphia to Mack, Colo. it was shipped on the top of #9952. It
arrived in July 1926 and is shown on page 86. Two years later, in April
1928, No. 51 2-6-6-2T was also shipped from BLW to Mack, Colo. also on
LV #9952. This is shown on page 91.

It is interesting to note when #50 was shipped, they laid ties and 3'
tracks on top of the well opening. When #51 was shipped, they removed
the front lead truck and rear trailing truck, and the drivers sit
partially in the well opening. The stack was not removed either time so
there must had been plenty of top clearance.

I wouldn't be surprised if Baldwin also used this same car for other
heavy narrow guage locomotive deliveries too.

Stan Schwedler

121541 - 121560 of 188712