Date   

Re: Naperville Photos

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Dave,
Of the 5 photos that you list as Rich Chrysler's work, only the first
one is his work. The other 4 are Bill Sharpe.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "dh30973" <76523.1060@...> wrote:

I have gotten together my Pbase album from this weekends Sunshine
Models Naperville Prototype Modelers Meet

http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/naperville07

Dave Hussey


Re: Naperville Photos

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Thank you Dave -- Andy


Re: Naperville Photos

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Thanks for posting the photos Dave. Really appreciate your effort. The
4 red & white M&StL engines were built by Jason Klocke, not Clark ProPst
Clark ProPst


Naperville Photos

dh30973 <76523.1060@...>
 

I have gotten together my Pbase album from this weekends Sunshine
Models Naperville Prototype Modelers Meet

http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/naperville07

Dave Hussey


Re: Round "button" on top of reefer roof

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

However, centered on the roof, next to the running board is a round "button", which I at first thought was a leftover part of a sprue gate, or something<
Vent for when a heater is used in the winter?????

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Ben Hom, please contact me off list

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Ben Hom, please contact me off list.

Thanks,

Mike Brock


Re: Cars for shipment of nuclear materials processing facilities; Was: Car travel hoppers

Steve SANDIFER
 

Maybe not exactly what you had in mind, the but Amarillo RR Museum has cars once used for Nuclear weapons going from the Pantex plant. There was an excellent clinic presented on these cars/trains at the Santa Fe Society convention in Amarillo and I have photos of those cars.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Dr., Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417
Personal: http://www.geocities.com/stevesandifer2000/index
Church: http://www.swcentral.org

----- Original Message -----
From: Garth Groff
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2007 8:47 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Cars for shipment of nuclear materials processing facilities; Was: Car travel hoppers


Elden,

You need to get a JANE'S FIGHTING SHIPS for the 1950s. Jane's will tell
you where these various nuclear-powered ships and boats (subs are always
"boats") were built and when. Electric Boat of Groton, Connecticut,
built many post-war U.S. submarines, but I don't know if that extended
back into the 1950s, or if there were other builders. IIRC, the first
U.S. nuclear surface ship was the destroyer Long Beach, followed by the
carriers. There was also a nuclear commercial freighter, the Savannah,
which I think is still laid up in the mothball fleet on Chesapeake Bay.
It is also likely that some nuclear vessels were refueled on the West
Coast, probably at Bremmerton, Washington, or possibly Long Beach,
California.

As to what railroad equipment was available to carry nuclear materials,
I can't say. Lionel used to put out some really keen models of flatcars
with nuclear reactors. Maybe you could find one of those. ;-)

Kind regards,

Garth G. Groff

Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:
> Group;
>
>
>
> I was hoping someone on the list might help in my research on the following
> topic: What types of cars, materials, source areas, shipping railroads, might
> have been used, in the shipment of materials to sites that were involved in
> the materials processing operations associated with development and testing
> of small nuclear reactors, specifically subs and nuclear surface vessels, in
> the immediate post-war era. The following blurb gives an idea of the site:
>
>
>
>
>> "Activities relating to naval nuclear propulsion systems are performed in
>>
> accordance with the requirements and authority of the Naval Nuclear
> Propulsion Program, a joint DOE and U.S. Department of Navy program
> responsible for all activities relating to naval nuclear propulsion. BAPL
> operations include development and testing of nuclear fuel materials and
> reactor materials, including radiochemical analysis.
>
> Located south of Pittsburgh in Large, PA, Pittsburgh Materials Technology
> Inc. (PMTI) was formed in 1993 from a unit of Westinghouse. The Large PA site
> where PMTI is now located was built by Joseph Large, Jr., who began
> distilling Monongahela Pure Rye whiskey there in 1795. During World War II,
> the distillery made alcohol for the war effort. Westinghouse Electric
> Corporation, as operator of the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, began using
> the site in 1951 for materials processing operations related to the Navy
> nuclear submarine effort. In the late 50's, the nation began working on space
> nuclear propulsion and Westinghouse established the Astronuclear Laboratory
> to participate in this effort. In 1961, Astronuclear was awarded a contract
> to design and build a Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA).
> The Large site became the focus for that effort.
>
>
>
> I'd also be interested in any info you might know of on the latter
> Astronuclear Laboratory effort. I am very interested in the site, and
> operations on the PRR that moved cars in and out of the Large, PA site. I am
> not interested in details of what they did on the site that involve national
> security issues, but only what the PRR might have shipped in and out of
> there, how, and in what specific cars.
>
>
>
> Thanks!
>
>
>
> Elden Gatwood


Boxcar details, SOO 136800-137198

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

I'm looking for some detail information regarding Soo Line boxcars
from the series 136800-137198, built in late 1951. The only online
photos I could locate are on the pay side of the RPI website, but
here are the links:

http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/displayimage.php?i=20521#

http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/displayimage.php?i=20517#

My questions are:

1. What sort of running boards were these cars built with?

2. What sort of trucks were used (may be ASF A-3 Ride Controls, but
I'm not sure).

3. As delivered these cars had the billboard Soo Line lettering. The
ends appear to be the same color as the sides, but were the roof and
running boards painted too? Should the underframe be painted the
same color as the rest of the car?

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Re: Cars for shipment of nuclear materials processing facilities; Was: Car travel hoppers

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Elden,

You need to get a JANE'S FIGHTING SHIPS for the 1950s. Jane's will tell you where these various nuclear-powered ships and boats (subs are always "boats") were built and when. Electric Boat of Groton, Connecticut, built many post-war U.S. submarines, but I don't know if that extended back into the 1950s, or if there were other builders. IIRC, the first U.S. nuclear surface ship was the destroyer Long Beach, followed by the carriers. There was also a nuclear commercial freighter, the Savannah, which I think is still laid up in the mothball fleet on Chesapeake Bay. It is also likely that some nuclear vessels were refueled on the West Coast, probably at Bremmerton, Washington, or possibly Long Beach, California.

As to what railroad equipment was available to carry nuclear materials, I can't say. Lionel used to put out some really keen models of flatcars with nuclear reactors. Maybe you could find one of those. ;-)

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:

Group;


I was hoping someone on the list might help in my research on the following
topic: What types of cars, materials, source areas, shipping railroads, might
have been used, in the shipment of materials to sites that were involved in
the materials processing operations associated with development and testing
of small nuclear reactors, specifically subs and nuclear surface vessels, in
the immediate post-war era. The following blurb gives an idea of the site:



"Activities relating to naval nuclear propulsion systems are performed in
accordance with the requirements and authority of the Naval Nuclear
Propulsion Program, a joint DOE and U.S. Department of Navy program
responsible for all activities relating to naval nuclear propulsion. BAPL
operations include development and testing of nuclear fuel materials and
reactor materials, including radiochemical analysis.
Located south of Pittsburgh in Large, PA, Pittsburgh Materials Technology
Inc. (PMTI) was formed in 1993 from a unit of Westinghouse. The Large PA site
where PMTI is now located was built by Joseph Large, Jr., who began
distilling Monongahela Pure Rye whiskey there in 1795. During World War II,
the distillery made alcohol for the war effort. Westinghouse Electric
Corporation, as operator of the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, began using
the site in 1951 for materials processing operations related to the Navy
nuclear submarine effort. In the late 50's, the nation began working on space
nuclear propulsion and Westinghouse established the Astronuclear Laboratory
to participate in this effort. In 1961, Astronuclear was awarded a contract
to design and build a Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA).
The Large site became the focus for that effort.

I'd also be interested in any info you might know of on the latter
Astronuclear Laboratory effort. I am very interested in the site, and
operations on the PRR that moved cars in and out of the Large, PA site. I am
not interested in details of what they did on the site that involve national
security issues, but only what the PRR might have shipped in and out of
there, how, and in what specific cars.


Thanks!


Elden Gatwood


Re: Cars for shipment of nuclear materials processing facilities; Was: Car travel hoppers

Gatwood, Elden J SAD <Elden.J.Gatwood@...>
 

CJ;



I would greatly appreciate that!



Thanks,



Elden Gatwood



________________________________

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of cj
riley
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2007 10:00 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Cars for shipment of nuclear materials processing
facilities; Was: Car travel hoppers



Elden,

My former brother-in-law and college rrom mate worked at the astronuclear lab
after college in the mid 60s. He worked on an nuclear rocket engine tht was
deemed a success after it operated for some number of seconds before
destruction (non catastrophic). Don't know that he would know much about the
railroad end, but I can probably get you an adress.

CJ Riley

-

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com <http://mail.yahoo.com>


Re: Cullet

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

I forgot to mention, lest there be any confusion, that this is
NOT what happens when scrap steel is remelted. You don't get anything
like "pure iron," but simply the net of the alloying contents in the
scrap. Some impurities can be slagged off, but scrap is usually
segregated as to approximate alloy content (and is considerably less
valuable if not segregated), just so that the sometimes complex and
subtle adjustment of alloy content does not have to be done on a very
big scale.
I think John is confusing remelting of scrap, with
production
from raw materials.

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@...

That reminds me of a message a while back, either here or on the Ry
Ops Industrial sig list, where a knowledgeable poster commented on the
vigilance mills now employ to keep radioactive scrap metal out of
their process, for fear of turning out an entire heat of radioactive
re-bar that would then have to be treated as HAZMAT waste.

Makes me wonder, with the level of quality control (or lack thereof )
currently coming to light in Chinese industry, just how many reactor
vessel parts went into the re-bar used in the Three Gorges dam project.

Guess we'll just have to wait and see if it glows in the dark :-)

Dennis


Re: Cars for shipment of nuclear materials processing facilities; Was: Car travel hoppers

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

Elden,

My former brother-in-law and college rrom mate worked at the astronuclear lab
after college in the mid 60s. He worked on an nuclear rocket engine tht was
deemed a success after it operated for some number of seconds before
destruction (non catastrophic). Don't know that he would know much about the
railroad end, but I can probably get you an adress.

CJ Riley


-

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com


Re: Cullet again

Russ Strodtz <railfreightcars@...>
 

The destination was Owens-Illinois in Streator IL. That was also where they
bought the bottles from.

Russ

----- Original Message -----
From: Norman+Laraine Larkin
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, 29 October, 2007 15:01
Subject: [STMFC] Cullet again


Kalmback published "More Railroads You can Model", edited by Mike Schafer, in 1978. One of the articles was "Milwaukee Road's Beer Line" and a picture of an open hopper under the cullet shute at the new Schlitz bottling plant appears on page 48. The plant went into operation in early 1959, so it's just under the wire for the list. The photo is 1970s, but I'd guess cullet was a big product at the start of operations. Normally, one car was loaded per week, and during the summer, up to two cars per week were shipped to Chicago for recycling the broken glass. Another source for this information is "The Milwaukee Road's Beer Line" by Art Harnack, published as Special Publication Number 5 by the Milwaukee Road Historical Association.
Regards,
Norm Larkin


Re: Cars for shipment of nuclear materials processing facilities; Was: Car travel hoppers

Gatwood, Elden J SAD <Elden.J.Gatwood@...>
 

Group;



I was hoping someone on the list might help in my research on the following
topic: What types of cars, materials, source areas, shipping railroads, might
have been used, in the shipment of materials to sites that were involved in
the materials processing operations associated with development and testing
of small nuclear reactors, specifically subs and nuclear surface vessels, in
the immediate post-war era. The following blurb gives an idea of the site:



"Activities relating to naval nuclear propulsion systems are performed in
accordance with the requirements and authority of the Naval Nuclear
Propulsion Program, a joint DOE and U.S. Department of Navy program
responsible for all activities relating to naval nuclear propulsion. BAPL
operations include development and testing of nuclear fuel materials and
reactor materials, including radiochemical analysis.

Located south of Pittsburgh in Large, PA, Pittsburgh Materials Technology
Inc. (PMTI) was formed in 1993 from a unit of Westinghouse. The Large PA site
where PMTI is now located was built by Joseph Large, Jr., who began
distilling Monongahela Pure Rye whiskey there in 1795. During World War II,
the distillery made alcohol for the war effort. Westinghouse Electric
Corporation, as operator of the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, began using
the site in 1951 for materials processing operations related to the Navy
nuclear submarine effort. In the late 50's, the nation began working on space
nuclear propulsion and Westinghouse established the Astronuclear Laboratory
to participate in this effort. In 1961, Astronuclear was awarded a contract
to design and build a Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA).
The Large site became the focus for that effort.



I'd also be interested in any info you might know of on the latter
Astronuclear Laboratory effort. I am very interested in the site, and
operations on the PRR that moved cars in and out of the Large, PA site. I am
not interested in details of what they did on the site that involve national
security issues, but only what the PRR might have shipped in and out of
there, how, and in what specific cars.



Thanks!



Elden Gatwood





________________________________

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
SUVCWORR@...
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2007 5:51 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Mineral Stock piles WasRe: [STMFC] Re: Car travel of hoppers
including "strays"


Re: glass cullet in hoppers, out of era.

James Eckman
 

One reason that bottle plants generate cullet is that if a SINGLE bottle is found with a defect called a bird's swing, the entire batch of bottles is rejected and smashed on the spot, even if there are 1,000s in that batch. When the bottles are filled, this defect leaves tiny shards of glass in the bottle. Very nasty to say the least. Also hangups in the line can quickly destroy 100 or more bottles in a very short period of time. These happen fairly often. The technology hasn't changed much since the 40's from what I understand except for inspection and threaded caps.

Jim Eckman
Former designer of bottle inspection equipment


Re: Cullet

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

John C. La Rue, Jr. wrote:
I suspect that any coloring agents would have been removed when the cullet was melted in the furnaces, much as carbon and trace additives are removed when scrap iron and steel are melted...the additives unite with the limestone to form slag, which is removed, thus leaving pure iron.
I forgot to mention, lest there be any confusion, that this is NOT what happens when scrap steel is remelted. You don't get anything like "pure iron," but simply the net of the alloying contents in the scrap. Some impurities can be slagged off, but scrap is usually segregated as to approximate alloy content (and is considerably less valuable if not segregated), just so that the sometimes complex and subtle adjustment of alloy content does not have to be done on a very big scale.
I think John is confusing remelting of scrap, with production from raw materials.

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@...


Re: Cullet

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

John C. La Rue, Jr. wrote:
I suspect that any coloring agents would have been removed when the cullet was melted in the furnaces, much as carbon and trace additives are removed when scrap iron and steel are melted...the additives unite with the limestone to form slag, which is removed, thus leaving pure iron.
Different process, John. In fact, colored glass is QUITE hard to re-clarify. You can mix brown and green glass, but not put either one into clear glass. And blue glass is a serious contaminant for any other glass color.
There are several reasons, but an important one is that glass melting is a very slow process, mostly due to the viscosity and resulting slow circulation and mixing of the glass--24-hour melts are common, whereas steelmaking can be accomplished in 90 minutes or less. (That's the reason that glass recycling really saves little energy; the process takes about as long, and about as much energy, whether you use raw materials or cullet. But you DO take all those bottle-size voids out of landfills.) Another difference from iron refining is that there is no slag equivalent in glassmaking.

Anthony Thompson
Dept. of Materials Science & Engineering
University of California, Berkeley
thompsonmarytony@...


Re: glass cullet in hoppers, out of era.

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dennis Storzek wrote:
That would be "post-consumer" recycling. The cullet being loaded at breweries is "industrial" scrap, from breakage, chipped necks and the like, and would be all one type of glass that could go directly back to the bottle manufacture for re-use. I'm sure returning cullet from the bottling plant long pre-dates post-consumer recycling.
Dennis is entirely right, and the same goes for in-plant steel scrap, aluminum, etc. etc. for all kinds of manufacturing. Nowadays people often mean "post-consumer" when they say "recycling" but the kind described here certainly goes back to the 19th century and quite possibly back before the Industrial Revolution.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: glass cullet in hoppers, out of era.

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...> wrote:

Russ didn't seem to make this clear, but you shouldn't be moving
crushed glass in happers until after glass recycling got to large
enough volumes, way out of the era of this list. I can tell you where
it's shipped in New England - ask the question on the OPSIG list.

That would be "post-consumer" recycling. The cullet being loaded at
breweries is "industrial" scrap, from breakage, chipped necks and the
like, and would be all one type of glass that could go directly back
to the bottle manufacture for re-use. I'm sure returning cullet from
the bottling plant long pre-dates post-consumer recycling.

Dennis


Re: Cullet

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Blue, Chuck? I thought the cullet cars were the silver ones?


SGL



Cullet was also shipped from Oneonta in special service fishbelly twin
hoppers painted blue.

Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO

127521 - 127540 of 194713