Date   

Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

destron@...
 

The short answer is yes - it was the Canadian subsidiary of Union Oil of
California, active mostly in the 1930s and 1940s and its British Columbia
operation was closely intertwined with that of Imperial Oil (Esso etc)

A great resource for tracking reporting marks is run by Ian Cranstone at
http://www.nakina.net/report.html The listings for UOKX are at
http://www.nakina.net/reportu.html and show the following:
Thanks for that; answered a question on another tank car photo I have
(NSOX 328) - North Star Oil was absorbed into Shell Canada.

Is your photo at an accessible location? I'd be interested to have a close
look at it.
I can send you a copy if you want - I have digital copy from the original.
I've also got photos of the NSOX cars as mentioned, as well as several IOX
cars (2031, 4154, 4253, 4280, 6032), CGTX 63844 (?? number is hard to make
out), COBX 1986, EBAX 326, PQCX 104 and UTLX 228.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

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Re: Link to the NMRA "The Postwar Freight Car Fleet" BooK

SUVCWORR@...
 

Greg,

It was in the non-member store on the NMRA.org site but it is no longer
listed. Amazon also lists it as unavailable. I would appear the second printing
is sold out.

Rich Orr



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Re: Post War Freight Car Fleet

Schuyler Larrabee
 

This raises the question in my mind, what sort of print run >>did<< they make? And could it have
cost less if they'd tripled the run vs whatever they did make?

SGL





Greg Martin wrote:

NMRA COULD sell at least another 200


Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

Doug Rhodes
 

The short answer is yes - it was the Canadian subsidiary of Union Oil of California, active mostly in the 1930s and 1940s and its British Columbia operation was closely intertwined with that of Imperial Oil (Esso etc)

A great resource for tracking reporting marks is run by Ian Cranstone at http://www.nakina.net/report.html The listings for UOKX are at http://www.nakina.net/reportu.html and show the following:

UOKX Union Oil Co. of Canada, Ltd. (Union Oil Co. of California)7/1930-7/1932
UOKX Union Oil Co. of Canada, Ltd.7/1937-1/1945
UOKX British American Oil Co. Ltd.1/1946-4/1947

BA acquired assets of Union Oil Co. of Canada after WW2, including the location on Burrard Inlet (Unocan) that became Britamoco, so that last line makes sense in that regard.

Is your photo at an accessible location? I'd be interested to have a close look at it.

Doug Rhodes

----- Original Message -----
From: destron@vcn.bc.ca
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, November 18, 2007 11:10 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.



>>snipped


Slightly related, in that it is tank cars: I have a photo of a tank car
marked "Union Oil Co of Canada, Vancouver, BC", UOKX 10010. Did this have
anything to do with the Union Oil Co of California? I don't know the date
of the photo, but it is on archbar trucks. Does anyone have an idea around
what time this may have been? UOKX is not listed in 1953 ORER... was it
listed previously?

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


.


Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 18, 2007, at 11:10 AM, destron@vcn.bc.ca wrote:

... I have a photo of a tank car
marked "Union Oil Co of Canada, Vancouver, BC", UOKX 10010. Did this
have
anything to do with the Union Oil Co of California? I don't know the
date
of the photo, but it is on archbar trucks. Does anyone have an idea
around
what time this may have been? UOKX is not listed in 1953 ORER... was
it
listed previously?
Union Oil of Canada was Union Oil of California's western Canadian
subsidiary. I have several photos of UOKX cars dating from the late
1920s. The 11/31 ORER shows 70 cars under OKX reporting marks. By
1945, 55 of those cars were still listed in the ORER, but they were
gone by 1947 and the entire Union Oil tank car fleet had been
renumbered, so it's hard to tell whether they were sold or absorbed
into the UOCX fleet.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 18, 2007, at 10:22 AM, Robert wrote:

Could it be Sun Oil Company, later Sunoco?
No. because the Sun Oil Co. was entirely an east coast operation (and
later midwestern, after it acquired DX). It had no offices in Los
Angeles, no western production facilities, and no wholesale or retail
operations in the western US.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

destron@...
 

Sunray Oil, perhaps? Just at a blind-fire guess.

Slightly related, in that it is tank cars: I have a photo of a tank car
marked "Union Oil Co of Canada, Vancouver, BC", UOKX 10010. Did this have
anything to do with the Union Oil Co of California? I don't know the date
of the photo, but it is on archbar trucks. Does anyone have an idea around
what time this may have been? UOKX is not listed in 1953 ORER... was it
listed previously?

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Robert Simpson wrote:
Could it be Sun Oil Company, later Sunoco?
And lettered for Los Angeles? Not very likely.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




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Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Robert Simpson wrote:
Could it be Sun Oil Company, later Sunoco?
And lettered for Los Angeles? Not very likely.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

Robert <riverob@...>
 

Could it be Sun Oil Company, later Sunoco?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunoco


Robert Simpson


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Dan Gledhill <gledhilldan@...> wrote:

Hello ,
I've been trying to identify an early rivetted tank car
that has only part of it's original company name left on it's upper
side.The name as I can best make out begins with the word SUN in dark
8 to 10 inch Roman print and ends with the words OIL COMPANY in the
same style.It appears as if the dome may have been silver and also
the upper tank,as a little of the original paint exists on the tanks
top surfaces.There is some smaller lettering stenciled on the cars
lower sides ,which is approx. 3 to 4 inchs high and reads LOS ANGELIS
while further along the cars side in similar print are the name
CALIFORNIA.
With all the recent posts on Atlas tank car 105 lately and
several mentions of California oil companies having the name SUN in
them ,hopefully someone could help identify this one.
Tanks in Advance
Dan
Gledhill



---------------------------------
Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to
Yahoo! Answers.



Re: Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping, was "Gloss coat for decalling"

destron@...
 

I've seen it used for making bridge piers; I don't know if there had been
any filing or other cleanup work done to the parts, but they looked very
sharp.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Jeff wrote >
Commercial models are available made using the rapid prototyping
technique. The outfit is called Smoky Mountain Model Works and is
run by Jim King. Jim was making O-scale models but was unhappy with
the degree of support from the O-scale community and switched over to
S-scale about a year ago. He has also made some HO products under
contract to others; the one that comes to mind is a SOU gondola
(which was also the prototype of his first S-scale product)

Tom Madden gave a clinic at Naperville a couple of years ago. While
RP is slick, there is a huge learning curve to making good models
using this technique, and at this point only somebody whose job gives
them access to the equipment (as Jim King has) can economically use
it for making models.
The article that Bruce referred to makes this particular type of RP
accessible to the average modeler. There is a need to "draft" the part
in 3-D but the rest of the work can be out-sourced. While the resulting
part sounds expensive ($25 for a air compressor in 1/32 scale as I
recall....I don't have access to the article right now), it would be
worthwhile if the resulting RP part can then used as a master for
casting duplicates in resin. The only question that I have is whether or
not the parts are as "clean" as an equivalent scratchbuilt part. I plan
to give it a try...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com






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Re: Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping, was "Gloss coat for decalling"

Jack Burgess
 

Jeff wrote >
Commercial models are available made using the rapid prototyping technique. The outfit is called Smoky Mountain Model Works and is run by Jim King. Jim was making O-scale models but was unhappy with the degree of support from the O-scale community and switched over to S-scale about a year ago. He has also made some HO products under contract to others; the one that comes to mind is a SOU gondola (which was also the prototype of his first S-scale product)
Tom Madden gave a clinic at Naperville a couple of years ago. While RP is slick, there is a huge learning curve to making good models using this technique, and at this point only somebody whose job gives them access to the equipment (as Jim King has) can economically use it for making models.
The article that Bruce referred to makes this particular type of RP accessible to the average modeler. There is a need to "draft" the part in 3-D but the rest of the work can be out-sourced. While the resulting part sounds expensive ($25 for a air compressor in 1/32 scale as I recall....I don't have access to the article right now), it would be worthwhile if the resulting RP part can then used as a master for casting duplicates in resin. The only question that I have is whether or not the parts are as "clean" as an equivalent scratchbuilt part. I plan to give it a try...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Tank Car Co. names beginning with Sun.

Dan Gledhill
 

Hello ,
I've been trying to identify an early rivetted tank car that has only part of it's original company name left on it's upper side.The name as I can best make out begins with the word SUN in dark 8 to 10 inch Roman print and ends with the words OIL COMPANY in the same style.It appears as if the dome may have been silver and also the upper tank,as a little of the original paint exists on the tanks top surfaces.There is some smaller lettering stenciled on the cars lower sides ,which is approx. 3 to 4 inchs high and reads LOS ANGELIS while further along the cars side in similar print are the name CALIFORNIA.
With all the recent posts on Atlas tank car 105 lately and several mentions of California oil companies having the name SUN in them ,hopefully someone could help identify this one.
Tanks in Advance
Dan Gledhill



---------------------------------
Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers.


Re: Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping, was "Gloss coat for decalling"

Jeff English
 

Bruce,

Commercial models are available made using the rapid prototyping
technique. The outfit is called Smoky Mountain Model Works and is
run by Jim King. Jim was making O-scale models but was unhappy with
the degree of support from the O-scale community and switched over to
S-scale about a year ago. He has also made some HO products under
contract to others; the one that comes to mind is a SOU gondola
(which was also the prototype of his first S-scale product)

Tom Madden gave a clinic at Naperville a couple of years ago. While
RP is slick, there is a huge learning curve to making good models
using this technique, and at this point only somebody whose job gives
them access to the equipment (as Jim King has) can economically use
it for making models.

Hope this helps -

Jeff English
Troy, New York

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "bdg1210" <Bruce_Griffin@...> wrote:

Group members,

Based on this and other comments about the current issue of Fine
Scale Modeler I purchased a copy to learn about using Future for a
gloss decaling finish. What I found more intersting was an article
about developing parts using CAD and online 3D printing to get the
part delievered to your door. It appears expensive, but a great
chance to get that one part you need. Has anyone used a similar
process to get steam era freight car parts developed?

Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Summerfield, NC

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jack Burgess <jack@> wrote:

The current issue of Finescale Modeler has an insert on air-
brushing of
acrylic paints (but I will still stick with Floquil) and an
article
on
the use of Future. In reading past articles in Finescale Modeler,
it
seems that Future is the primary choice for plane, automobile,
etc.
modelers. I haven't used it yet in an airbrush but have brush
painted it
on just portions of wood models to allow for decaling and it
worked
just
fine. I'm sure that it won't hurt the Floquil. You need to be
careful
only if applying a heavy coat of a lacquer-based paint (such as
Floquil)
over an enamel or water-based paint...

Jack Burgess
yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Post War Freight Car Fleet

Greg Martin
 

In a message dated 11/17/2007 2:36:43 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
bauerrv2000@yahoo.com writes:




You might check www.speedwitch.You might check www.speedwitch.<WBR>com for
stock. Rainer Bauer



Actually, that was the forest place I looked and they are sold out. I think
I have it covered but I am going to have to back my bet and keep searching.
But It think that the NMRA COULD sell at least another 200 or perhaps more.
They also need to spread the word better as well.

Greg Martin

.


Greg








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Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping, was "Gloss coat for decalling"

bdg1210 <Bruce_Griffin@...>
 

Group members,

Based on this and other comments about the current issue of Fine
Scale Modeler I purchased a copy to learn about using Future for a
gloss decaling finish. What I found more intersting was an article
about developing parts using CAD and online 3D printing to get the
part delievered to your door. It appears expensive, but a great
chance to get that one part you need. Has anyone used a similar
process to get steam era freight car parts developed?

Regards,
Bruce D. Griffin
Summerfield, NC

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jack Burgess <jack@...> wrote:

The current issue of Finescale Modeler has an insert on air-
brushing of
acrylic paints (but I will still stick with Floquil) and an article
on
the use of Future. In reading past articles in Finescale Modeler,
it
seems that Future is the primary choice for plane, automobile, etc.
modelers. I haven't used it yet in an airbrush but have brush
painted it
on just portions of wood models to allow for decaling and it worked
just
fine. I'm sure that it won't hurt the Floquil. You need to be
careful
only if applying a heavy coat of a lacquer-based paint (such as
Floquil)
over an enamel or water-based paint...

Jack Burgess
yosemitevalleyrr.com


IC Reefers

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

I learned from Richard Hendrickson in Naperville that the IC had R-40-10
clones. I see that Intermountain has also done PFE R-40-23 cars in an IC
scheme. Are these correct too? Is there a definitive source on IC steel
reefers, an ICHS back issue?
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: True Line Trains HO Scale Canadian Prewar AAR Boxcars

W.R.Dixon
 

pierreoliver2003 wrote:
Al,
The problem from where I sit is that it isn't painted but cast in somewhat the correct colour. Giving the whole car a toy like appearance.
It makes me fear for the upcoming cabooses.
Pierre Oliver
I have handled painted test shots of the cabooses, both CNR and CPR.
They are Very Nice. Going to sell out!

If you are not on a reservation list at your LHS you will probably not get one. Not a big problem if you are willing to wait for the second or third run of numbers. These models are done right and will be rerun several times.

Bill Dixon


Re: Atlas ICC 105 tank

John Hile <john66h@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

On Nov 17, 2007, at 6:05 AM, John Hile wrote:

Anchor Petroleum Co (ANPX) has ICC105A300W's in the 1/53 ORER and
lists one of their home points as Gulf, CA (Sunset Ry). I still have
to determine what products Anchor produced at the Gulf, CA facility,
but significant natural gas and petroleum deposits were found in Kern
Co.
I have a Stan Kistler photo of a steam-era train on the Sunset Ry.
which included an Anchor ICC-105, so Anchor was apparently hauling LPG
from its facility in the Taft area.

Richard Hendrickson

Thanks Richard, that is very helpful.

John Hile
Blacksburg, VA


Re: Atlas ICC 105 tank

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 17, 2007, at 2:15 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Richard, Atlas did a second run of Warren cars in the correct
light gray paint (e.g. Atlas #1032-4). They also did black Warren
cars (Atlas #1077-x).
Thanks, Tim. I'll order one, and probably repaint the one I have black
and decal it UTLX with Steve Hile's nice lettering set.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Atlas ICC 105 tank

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Andy S wrote:

Atlas appears to have corrected the color of its Warren car. I saw
one new in its box in a hobby shop last weekend that was light gray
instead of aluminum.

Andy is correct. I have one of each in my hands. Part #s 1032-1 and -2 have silver on their tanks, #s 1032-3 and -4 have light gray.

Scott Chatfield

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