Date   

DT&I 11500-11799 Rebuilt USRA DS 40' Boxcar

Dean Payne
 

On the DT&I Modelers Page, there is info on modeling the DT&I rebuilt
USRA boxcar using the Tichy kit:

http://dti.railfan.net/Equipment_Database/DTI11000sUSRA40'dsBox/ArtDTI11
500s.html

The trouble is, the DT&I used a 16-panel Cambre radial roof (there's a
nice photo on the above page). This is not available in HO. Assuming
that a scratch-built radial roof is more than I want to get into, what
is available that would work as a stand-in? Walthers shows no radial
roofs, the Central Valley roof shows as "round roof". The Cambre roof
doesn't look at all like the flat panel roof on the Tichy kit.
Dean Payne


Re: AH&D Steam Crane...

Ted Schnepf
 

Hi Jack,

American Hoist and Derrick is still in business in St. Paul, Mn. They might have plans yet.

Ted

At 09:01 PM 11/24/2007, you wrote:

Speaking of M of W equipment, the Yosemite Valley Railroad owned a steam
crane described as:

An American Hoist and Derrick 18-ton locomotive steam crane, combination
shovel and pile driver, boom 27', shovel capacity 1 yard.

Before I start working up drawings based entirely on photos in order to
scratchbuild this piece of equipment, does anyone have plans for such a
crane or know where I might obtain them?

Thanks

Jack Burgess
Rails Unlimited
Ted Schnepf
railsunl@...
847-697-5353 or 5366
126 Will Scarlet
Elgin, Ill. 60120
http://RailsUnlimited.ribbonrail.com/

Model Railroad Sales and Service with
a personal touch.
Books new and used. HO and O scales.
DCC supplies. O scale urethane cars.
Photos and darkroom services.
Checks, cash (0%) or credit (secure server at web site 4% added).


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Re: Removing Lettering from Intermountain HO Freight Cars

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Fred,
I don't think much snow falls in John's neck of the woods ;-)

regards,

Andy Miller

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Frederick Freitas
Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 2:27 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Removing Lettering from Intermountain HO
Freight Cars

John,

You need to pick up the pace with only 20 kits on standby; I
have 97 waiting for the snow to fall.

Fred Freitas
Bennington, VT


Re: Removing Lettering from Intermountain HO Freight Cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Fred Freitas wrote:
You need to pick up the pace with only 20 kits on standby; I have 97 waiting for the snow to fall.
Well said, Fred!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Removing Lettering from Intermountain HO Freight Cars

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

John,

You need to pick up the pace with only 20 kits on standby; I have 97 waiting for the snow to fall.

Fred Freitas
Bennington, VT

John Golden <golden1014@...> wrote:
Bruce, All,

I picked up a decorated, "RTR" car at Naperville for a song but it's
in the post-1951 all yellow scheme. For my era, I need the black-
trimmed "Ventilator-Refrigerator" cars. I have a few extra Sunshine
and Champ decals on hand but I need to study the photos to determine
which decals to use. I'll probably end up using a combination of
both.

I tried to remove lettering last night using decal setting solution
with zero success. I'll try something stronger tonight. I heard a
pencil eraser might work.

I agree with your assessment on kits--that's the best way to go.
However, I have about 20 unbuilt kits and another 12-15 cars on the
workbench right now and the thought of picking up a few more kits is
a bit unsettling!

John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

On Sat, November 24, 2007 10:46 pm, John Golden wrote:
Gentlemen,

I'd like to re-letter my HO Intermountain FGE reefers.
Can anyone recommend the best way to remove the
factory-applied lettering so I can decal my way to
happiness?

Thanks,
John
John,

Buy the kits <VBG>. They are a lot more "flexible" in that they
are
undec, and come with all the parts including both etched and wood
running
boards. I'll be "backdating" a few to 1944 <G>. The only issue is
decals, and right now, I'm planning on using Martin's.

Are you relettering or just renumbering or are you changing the
paint as
well? What are you using for decals?

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping

Charlie Vlk
 

Bill-
Mr. Madden already addressed your point, but I would like to further clarify what I meant....
By "printing" I meant the laser printer/inkjet type products that have been starting to pop up heading towards home use....
not the machines used for commercial rapid prototyping. I did not think of the "Polyjet" as a printing process, although
all processes that add material to build an object rather than milling away a solid block can certainly be so considered in
the broadest sense....
I imagine that the cost of the technologies should come down.... the machines themselves are not any more complicated
than similar devices used for other purposes.... only the marketplace and the development costs for a rather narrow market
are supporting the $60-100,000 price tags..... and the resins, etc. used for the build medium are not that exotic either.
Hopefully there will be improvements in the technology and price so that they can be used for actual manufacturing...not just
for rapid prototyping.... something that would have a serious impact on our hobby as more of us learn how to draw in 3D and
can then get any prototype...no matter how exotic....in model form in modest quantities with modest production costs.
Charlie Vlk


Re: Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping

Jim King
 

Rob,



The best way, IMHO, to represent exterior detail on round surfaces, like
tank cars and Vandy tenders, is to go the "wrapper way". Build the basic
body from traditional methods if you don't need 3D accuracy . also
associated with higher cost. Allow enough thickness compensation for the
wrapper and some flash, probably around .005" or less. Make the entire
wrapper or sections using the SLA process on a flat plate of .010, use this
as a pattern, make a rubber mold and cast away using a lower durometer
urethane, probably around 50-60 Shore D. The SLA material will be far too
brittle to use and the .010" sheet . build by itself . will be practically
impossible to build and clean. You will also need to fine an RP source with
the high-rez Viper SLA machine that can produce .002" layers. Anything
thicker than this will not create HO rivets accurately.



If you want more info or help designing such, contact me off list as this is
getting too technical for the list guidelines.



Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


Re: Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Rob asked:
Are any of the present technologies capable of laying just the
rivets onto
.010" or .020" styrene sheet? Or laying a sheet of the rapid prototype
material itself of about .01 or .02 thickness with rivets on top?

Or some better idea?

Here is one solution:

http://www.galtran.com/PRR_L2_Construction_Information/Rivet%20Machine/compu
ter_controlled_rivet_emboss.htm

or

http://tinyurl.com/fhh6d


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Removing Lettering from Intermountain HO Freight Cars

prgm_mgr
 

Hi John
I'd start by seeing if decal setting solution will remove them -
likely not since I'll bet the car was stamp printed when made. If
that doesn't work, try to locate an ink eraser ( the gritty one) or
an old carbon/typewriter eraser. You can then "erase" the lettering
you don't want. If you can't find these, you could glue some 600 -
1000 grit sand paper to a dowel end and create your own eraser.

Good Luck
Mark

--- In STMFC@..., John Golden <golden1014@...> wrote:

Gentlemen,

I'd like to re-letter my HO Intermountain FGE reefers.
Can anyone recommend the best way to remove the
factory-applied lettering so I can decal my way to
happiness?

Thanks,
John



John Golden
Bloomington, IN

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014
http://s-clmodeler.aclsal.org/currentissue/sclmodeler2007-2.pdf


Re: AH&D Steam Crane...

prgm_mgr
 

Hi Jack
YOu may want to contact Rio Grande Models. If I recall, they have
an AH&D Crane of this vintage

Mark Kraus


--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

Unfortunately, it is a 25-ton crane and considerably different in
appearance than the 1926-vintage YV crane...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Correction: The Walthers Crane IS a representation of the
American Crane of the 50's and is a diesel version rather than
steam but probably could be modified to represent steam. The
part
number for the unpowered version is 932-5610 (and others in that
series). It appears some on line dealers have them.

Robert Federle


Re: Removing Lettering from Intermountain HO Freight Cars

golden1014
 

Bruce, All,

I picked up a decorated, "RTR" car at Naperville for a song but it's
in the post-1951 all yellow scheme. For my era, I need the black-
trimmed "Ventilator-Refrigerator" cars. I have a few extra Sunshine
and Champ decals on hand but I need to study the photos to determine
which decals to use. I'll probably end up using a combination of
both.

I tried to remove lettering last night using decal setting solution
with zero success. I'll try something stronger tonight. I heard a
pencil eraser might work.

I agree with your assessment on kits--that's the best way to go.
However, I have about 20 unbuilt kits and another 12-15 cars on the
workbench right now and the thought of picking up a few more kits is
a bit unsettling!

John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN


--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

On Sat, November 24, 2007 10:46 pm, John Golden wrote:
Gentlemen,

I'd like to re-letter my HO Intermountain FGE reefers.
Can anyone recommend the best way to remove the
factory-applied lettering so I can decal my way to
happiness?

Thanks,
John
John,

Buy the kits <VBG>. They are a lot more "flexible" in that they
are
undec, and come with all the parts including both etched and wood
running
boards. I'll be "backdating" a few to 1944 <G>. The only issue is
decals, and right now, I'm planning on using Martin's.

Are you relettering or just renumbering or are you changing the
paint as
well? What are you using for decals?

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: TANK CARS

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Richard,

Can you offer any suggestions about who among the major operators might have owned AC&F type 11 cars in the late steam era. I bought F&C's 8K model with AOX decals, but wondered if any such cars might have been in SHPX, GATX, NATX or UTLX fleets? If so, any suggestions on numbers?

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff


Re: ID THE builder of these side dump cars?

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

John,

Backtrack through Magor Car Co; they made a lot of them for Oliver Mining. Thid might be where you find the missing link for these.

Fred Freitas

John Golden <golden1014@...> wrote:
Magor. Seaboard had cars exactly like it.

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

Can anyone identify the builder of these GB&W side dump cars?
http://www.greenbayroute.com/2002difco.htm

Difco?
Magor?
Austin-Western?
some other builder?

The cars apparently were ex-Oliver Mining, arriving on the GB&W in
June 1980, but I don't have info on their previous history. Any
clues
to their origin and history would be appreciated.

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.
The Green Bay Route: http://www.greenbayroute.com/


Re: for sale items

jaley <jaley@...>
 

Fred,

Very good: your message is well within the list guidelines.

Unfortunately, you did not include your email address. Some
folks' email programs only show STMFC@... as the return
address. And those who read STMFC via the website definitely don't see
your email address.

Regards,

-Jeff

On Nov 26, 2:18am, Fred Mullins wrote:
Subject: [STMFC] for sale items
I have gone throught some more boxes and have some brass cabooses and
P2k engs for sale. If interested contact me offlist for more info.
thanks
Fred Mullins
PS. I hope I did this right this time?
--
Jeff Aley jaley@...
DPG Chipsets Product Engineering
Intel Corporation, Folsom, CA
(916) 356-3533


Making Model parts through Rapid Prototyping

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

I'm coming into this late and without any expertise - just a question.

For the longest time I've been wondering about easier methods of building a variety of tanks for tank cars. I have a lathe, and so am happy to make ends and domes. I'm OK with embossing my own rivets or even gluing some on - within reason. Frames are there for kitbashing and scratchbuilding. But wrappers with appropriately patterned rivet detail are painful jobs to contemplate given they offer a one-off model, given the proneness to error in a long sustained concentration project of that sort, etc. So the idea of just drawing something in CAD and having a machine lay out the rivet pattern is tremendously appealing. Especially if it could then be translated into a resin master and a bunch of thin wrappers made.

So...

Are any of the present technologies capable of laying just the rivets onto .010" or .020" styrene sheet? Or laying a sheet of the rapid prototype material itself of about .01 or .02 thickness with rivets on top?

Or some better idea?

Rob Kirkham


Re: 1894 NYC&HR Stockcar

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

But,..I'm finding it interesting about the B-end hand-rails being of
the, some kind of, way pre-OSHA, "safety-type", being elevated so
much as they are in the article & drawings.

I've never seen this type of freight-car hand-railing elsewhere, in
any plans, pictures or drawings.

I'm sure that the plans were drawn as per the prototype?
I would assume that this car remained into the 1900's.
Ben, Paul,

Train Shed Cyc. No.55, reprints from the 1898 Car Builder's
Dictionary, has both a photo and drawings of a NYC&HRRR boxcar fitted
with this contraption on the B end, also drawings of a LS&MS boxcar
and a Wabash RR ventilated fruit car with similar contraptions, again
only on the B end adjacent to the brake wheel. None of these are
dimensioned, but the railing appears to be less than one grab iron
spacing from the top of the roof, so it's not really a railing, more
like a raised grab iron with a sway brace. I suspect the intention was
to give the brakeman something to hang on to while he knelt of the
roof to wind down the hand brake. It may have been a psudo safety
measure from the time when the railroads were still fighting the
mandatory requirement to equip their fleets with automatic brakes to
cut down on trainman injuries.

I suspect these handles outlived their usefulness as soon as air
brakes were fitted to the cars, and they seem rare enough in photos
that they likely didn't last very long after the turn of the twentieth
century.

Dennis


Re: 1894 NYC&HR Stockcar

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Paul Hillman asked:
"I'm wanting to build a model of the NYC&HR double-deck Stockcar as
described in the February 1959 Model Railroader article by Don
Reschenberg. A very beautiful stock car.

But,..I'm finding it interesting about the B-end hand-rails being of
the, some kind of, way pre-OSHA, "safety-type", being elevated so
much as they are in the article & drawings.

I've never seen this type of freight-car hand-railing elsewhere, in
any plans, pictures or drawings.

I'm sure that the plans were drawn as per the prototype?
I would assume that this car remained into the 1900's.

Any comments about these roof handrails? Were they particular to the
NYC&HR, or other roads also during the early 1900's?

Are they really necessary in building the model?"

Paul, I don't have this issue of MR handy. Are there feed doors in
the roof? Stock cars from that era were equipped with feed racks
that were accessed via roof doors, and the handrails might be
associated with that feature.


Ben Hom


1894 NYC&HR Stockcar

Paul Hillman
 

I'm wanting to build a model of the NYC&HR double-deck Stockcar as
described in the February 1959 Model Railroader article by Don
Reschenberg. A very beautiful stock car.

But,..I'm finding it interesting about the B-end hand-rails being of
the, some kind of, way pre-OSHA, "safety-type", being elevated so
much as they are in the article & drawings.

I've never seen this type of freight-car hand-railing elsewhere, in
any plans, pictures or drawings.

I'm sure that the plans were drawn as per the prototype?

I would assume that this car remained into the 1900's.

Any comments about these roof handrails? Were they particular to the
NYC&HR, or other roads also during the early 1900's?

Are they really necessary in building the model?

Thanks, Paul Hillman


for sale items

Fred Mullins
 

I have gone throught some more boxes and have some brass cabooses and
P2k engs for sale. If interested contact me offlist for more info.
thanks
Fred Mullins
PS. I hope I did this right this time?


Re: MKT single sheathed boxcar details

Tom Palmer
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Mark Heiden
To: STMFC@...
Sent: 11/25/2007 7:04:44 PM
Subject: [STMFC] MKT single sheathed boxcar details


Hello everyone,

I'm looking for some construction and painting information regarding
two series of MKT single sheathed boxcars.

The first cars are those from series MKT 77501-78000. They were
built in early 1923 as auto boxcars with a 10' door opening. In
1925, the auxiliary doors were removed and they were reclassified as
boxcars with a 6' door. My questions are:

1. I'm working from a broadside photo of MKT 77778 that shows a
little of the a-end. Were the b-end details the same or very similar
to cars from series MKT 76001-77500, built later the same year?
Yes

2. The photo of MKT 77778 shows an AB brake air tank mounted just
under the side of the car. Would the AB brake arrangement used on
MKT 76001-77500 be similar or the same?
No - ARA type under frame. The former autocars were fishbelly (deep) underframes

3. The trucks appear to be mounted very close to the ends of the car,
like CB&Q XM-25/26 boxcars. Is this correct?
Truck centers were 31 ft 1-1/2 in and 5 ft 6 in from end sill

The second series of cars I'm interested in is MKT 95000-95999, built
as general service boxcars in 1925. My question is:

1. As cars came up for shopping in the early 1940s they were fitted
with AB brakes as well as painted yellow. With the outbreak of World
War Two and the associated upturn in traffic, would any cars have
been painted yellow but kept their KC brakes in order to get them out
of the shops quickly?
Yes if they were in good condition. If not they were replaced with AB. All cars were eventually upgraded.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden
Tom Palmer - modeling the Katy in Texas in 1952

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