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Re: more movies

MDelvec952
 

This Property is Condemned was released on video this past summer, and I bought one for about $10.? Worth seeing, and it tells a realistic tale of a railroad beancounter evaluating yards and roundhouses for closure.



I haven't seen it in a while, but the locomotive is Reader 2-8-0 1702 in changing appearances. The freight cars are about right for the late '50s early 1960s with running boards. Steam era cars are on sidings and in yards.


Worth seeing.


Mike Del Vecchio

-----Original Message-----
From: Samuel James Ogden, Jr. <sjogden@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tue, 12 Feb 2008 10:55 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: more movies







--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@... wrote:

Here's another movie to warm the hearts of steam era freight car
fans... "The Ladykillers". Ok, the freight cars are British, but
trains
play an important part in this movie and there are some interesting
cargo ideas too.

Tim O'
I personally like some of the scenes in "This Property is Condemned"--
lots of early sixties 40' boxcars in Mississippi where it was filmed on
location. It's not as bad as the 50' PS1's in "Bound for Glory" which
is supposedly set in the early 1930s.

IMHO Robert Redford and Natalie Wood are just in the way... gimme more
freight cars. It has been a while since Turner Classic or The Movie
Channel has run this one.

Jim Ogden
Fort Worth, Texas





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Re: Atlas trucks

Brian Leppert <b.leppert@...>
 

Jon,

Here's some railroads that had some cabooses with the upcoming TMW caboose truck:

AC&Y, Alton, Ann Arbor, AT&SF, B&M, Belt Railway of Chicago, C&O, C&EI, CGW, C&IM, CNW, Clinchfield, DM&IR, D&RGW, GBW, GM&O, GN, KO&G, L&N, LNE, MP, M&St.L, NH, NKP, NYC, NP, Norfolk Southern (original), N&W, NYS&W, Pere Marquette, PH&D, P&WV, SAL, SP&S, SP, TN&O, TRRA, Virginian, and Wabash.

Glad you asked,

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon Miller" <atsf@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2008 10:36 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Atlas trucks


The only railroads I've found that used this version were PRR, who
replaced the original trucks on a few cabins, and Great Northern,<
I must have ordered them before you had even announced yours then. I do
know it's been a long time and at the time there was some discussion about
them.

The 30 ton version, which Richard mentioned, will be available in HO from
Tahoe Model Works in a couple of weeks<
Richard's email came to me with just my comments and none of his. So
who used the 30 ton versions?

And last I guess I should sell my Atlas trucks, anyone need them?

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


ARA 1932 box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

I got a recent notification from Atlas about new products and the
cover of their latest catalog caught my eye. Looks like a couple of
the new box cars made the cover.
http://download.atlasrr.com/ASC1Q2008/cover.jpg

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.


ARA 1932 box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

I got a recent notification from Atlas about new products and the
cover of their latest catalog caught my eye. Looks like a couple of
the new box cars made the cover.
http://download.atlasrr.com/ASC1Q2008/cover.jpg

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.


Re: UP G-50-13 GS QUESTIONS

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Richard,

Thanks. Just what I needed to know.

-- Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Feb 12, 2008, at 11:47 AM, Richard Hendrickson wrote:

On Feb 12, 2008, at 10:45 AM, billkeene2004 wrote:

Good morning Group,

This morning I found a partially completed Detail Associates kit
of a
Union Pacific general
service gondola (G-50-13, maybe) in the far hidden recesses of the
storage cabinet and
think it is time to complete this critter. This brings up a couple
of
questions that perhaps
some on this list might be able to answer.

First, while the kit supposedly came with trucks, these are now
among
the missing. What
would be the recommended trucks for installation on this car?

Second, as noted, I started building this kit to follow the UP
prototype, so what would be the
recommended decals for this kit?
The G-50-13s were equipped with Barber S-2 trucks, as modeled in HO
scale by Branchline.

Champ has very good decal sets specifically for these cars, HG-145 in
yellow (the lettering color with which they were delivered in 1951 and
re-lettered if repainted between 1951 and 1963) or HG-146 for cars
repainted after 1963.

Richard Hendrickson





Re: UP G-50-13 GS QUESTIONS

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 12, 2008, at 10:45 AM, billkeene2004 wrote:

Good morning Group,

This morning I found a partially completed Detail Associates kit of a
Union Pacific general
service gondola (G-50-13, maybe) in the far hidden recesses of the
storage cabinet and
think it is time to complete this critter. This brings up a couple of
questions that perhaps
some on this list might be able to answer.

First, while the kit supposedly came with trucks, these are now among
the missing. What
would be the recommended trucks for installation on this car?

Second, as noted, I started building this kit to follow the UP
prototype, so what would be the
recommended decals for this kit?
The G-50-13s were equipped with Barber S-2 trucks, as modeled in HO
scale by Branchline.

Champ has very good decal sets specifically for these cars, HG-145 in
yellow (the lettering color with which they were delivered in 1951 and
re-lettered if repainted between 1951 and 1963) or HG-146 for cars
repainted after 1963.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: 1930s train of coal hoppers - video anachronisms?

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "pieter_roos" <pieter_roos@...> wrote:

Hi Jon;

In addition to the WM hopper and the caboose mentioned by others I'll
note three non-freight car items (risking the wrath of the moderators
in the process). I hope others will correct me if I'm wrong.

2. The water tower atop the building in the second scene looks a bit
too modern to me.

3. In the first scene, the amount of blue paint on signs and building
trim seems unlikely for the era. Blue paints were less stable and
therefore expensive. Factory or warehouse windows would be painted in
greens, red/brown, black or white mostly.
I agree. As a long time resident of Chicago (since the early fifties)
the water tank doesn't ring true The rooftop tanks weren't pressure
vessels, so they didn't have hemispherical heads, they only stored
water for the sprinkler systems, and a wooden tank with a flat bottom
and peaked roof will do. I often thought the old Atlas wood water
tank, which is comically small for railroad use, would work for these
rooftop tanks quite well, but since I've never actually modeled a
Chicago city scene, I've never tried it. These tanks almost
universally sat on steel structures, except some that were installed
on concrete and brick curtain wall factory buildings had one bay of
concrete columns and beams above the roof to support the tank, still
normally wood. I did a little poking around the web looking for a good
photo of Chicago's industrial skyline, but the best I can come up with
is this view taken from South Water Street yard on the east side of
downtown; the near buildings are right downtown and don't have tanks
(if they do, they are enclosed within the structure for aesthetic
reasons) but a couple show silhouetted in the background.

http://flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/2179212164/

I also agree that blue was almost never seen as a building trim color
before the advent of modern synthetic pigments in the late fifties.
Most common seemed to be gray, at least on brick residential
buildings, followed by dark greens and browns on industrial buildings,
and ivory on the show side of public buildings.

To bring this back to freightcars, here is another view of the C&NW
Proviso RIP track we were discussing a couple weeks ago:

http://memory.loc.gov/pnp/fsa/8d11000/8d11200/8d11216r.jpg

Note the narrow gauge track with a cart of lumber strategically
spotted so no one need walk too far for material.

Dennis


UP G-50-13 GS QUESTIONS

billkeene2004 <wakeene@...>
 

Good morning Group,

This morning I found a partially completed Detail Associates kit of a Union Pacific general
service gondola (G-50-13, maybe) in the far hidden recesses of the storage cabinet and
think it is time to complete this critter. This brings up a couple of questions that perhaps
some on this list might be able to answer.

First, while the kit supposedly came with trucks, these are now among the missing. What
would be the recommended trucks for installation on this car?

Second, as noted, I started building this kit to follow the UP prototype, so what would be the
recommended decals for this kit?

Thanks for any help in answering these questions.

-- Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


Re: Atlas trucks

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

The only railroads I've found that used this version were PRR, who replaced the original trucks on a few cabins, and Great Northern,<
I must have ordered them before you had even announced yours then. I do know it's been a long time and at the time there was some discussion about them.

The 30 ton version, which Richard mentioned, will be available in HO from Tahoe Model Works in a couple of weeks<
Richard's email came to me with just my comments and none of his. So who used the 30 ton versions?

And last I guess I should sell my Atlas trucks, anyone need them?

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: 1930s train of coal hoppers - video anachronisms?

prgm_mgr
 

Hi Jon
I guess it depends on how picky you want us to be. These are
really, really picky:

1. The vehicles don't move at all for around 2 minutes in the first
scene - maybe a traffic jam but you can't tell. Maybe you could tie
a string to the bus facing forward to move it a bit so it seems to
be inching forward - just a thought.

2. There's a person in what appears to be mid-stride in the second
scene to the left. They don't move at all for over almost minute.


Looks like a great layout!

Mark


Re: Atlas trucks

Brian Leppert <b.leppert@...>
 

The Atlas plain bearing caboose truck replicates the 50 ton version of the Barber-Bettendorf Swing Motion Caboose Truck, based on its shape and the beading on the side frame's face that encircles the windows only. The only railroads I've found that used this version were PRR, who replaced the original trucks on a few cabins, and Great Northern, series X106 to 115, built 1967.

The 30 ton version, which Richard mentioned, will be available in HO from Tahoe Model Works in a couple of weeks. The prototype was manufactured from 1935 through the late 1950s, at least. Both Bettendorf and Standard Car Truck Co. (who added their trade name "Barber" to the truck's name) offered this side frame design. Bettendorf left the market in 1942 and sold all rights for the Swing Motion caboose truck to SCTCo. Over forty railroads used it.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Hendrickson" <rhendrickson@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, February 11, 2008 9:18 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Atlas trucks


On Feb 10, 2008, at 1:14 PM, Jon Miller wrote:

I finally received my Atlas trucks that I ordered a long time ago. I
know it was for something ATSF but also I also have the TMW
Bettendorf Swing
Motion for my cabeese. The Atlas trucks are similar but why did I
order
them <VBG>?
There would be a simple answer to this question except that you model
1941, Jon. The Tahoe trucks model the original Bettendorf Swing Motion
design of the 1920s and early 1930s; the Atlas trucks model the later
Swing Motion caboose truck design of the 1940s and '50s, as made by the
Standard Car Truck Co. after they took over Bettendorf's patent. The
later style swing motion truck was used on the wartime (1942-'43) Santa
Fe steel cabooses. But of course you can't model those; all of the
steel cabooses in service in 1941 were built in 1931 or earlier and had
the early style Bettendorf trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: more movies

Carl J. Marsico <Carlmarsico@...>
 

HBO did a movie about Pancho Villa with plenty of era-inappropriate freight cars. I don't recall the specific "violations", but I won't forget the look on my wife's face when I pointed them out...

CJM

----- Original Message ----
From: "Samuel James Ogden, Jr." <sjogden@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2008 9:55:48 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: more movies

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, timboconnor@ ... wrote:

Here's another movie to warm the hearts of steam era freight car
fans... "The Ladykillers" . Ok, the freight cars are British, but
trains
play an important part in this movie and there are some interesting
cargo ideas too.

Tim O'
I personally like some of the scenes in "This Property is Condemned"--
lots of early sixties 40' boxcars in Mississippi where it was filmed on
location. It's not as bad as the 50' PS1's in "Bound for Glory" which
is supposedly set in the early 1930s.

IMHO Robert Redford and Natalie Wood are just in the way... gimme more
freight cars. It has been a while since Turner Classic or The Movie
Channel has run this one.

Jim Ogden
Fort Worth, Texas


Re: more movies

Jim Ogden
 

--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@... wrote:

Here's another movie to warm the hearts of steam era freight car
fans... "The Ladykillers". Ok, the freight cars are British, but
trains
play an important part in this movie and there are some interesting
cargo ideas too.

Tim O'
I personally like some of the scenes in "This Property is Condemned"--
lots of early sixties 40' boxcars in Mississippi where it was filmed on
location. It's not as bad as the 50' PS1's in "Bound for Glory" which
is supposedly set in the early 1930s.

IMHO Robert Redford and Natalie Wood are just in the way... gimme more
freight cars. It has been a while since Turner Classic or The Movie
Channel has run this one.

Jim Ogden
Fort Worth, Texas


Re: Do Not Hump Signs

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Note that "do not hump" signs don't necessarily mean a car didn't go over the hump. With the advent of "electronic yards" in the late 50's when computer control of retarders was introduced, hump yards had much better control of car speeds. On the NYC we ignored those placards at the new yards because it was thought that there was less risk of unacceptable coupling speed than in a flat yard.

Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Question for the truck experts

Bob Karig <karig@...>
 

For those who may be interested, you can view Bettendorf's original truck patent at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Website.

Go to:

http://patft.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/srchnum.htm

Enter the patent number:

740617

At the second screen, click on "Images."

Subsequent Bettendorf patent numbers include,

793763
849194

Bob Karig


Re: more movies

Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@...>
 

One of my all time fave films - of course this is the original 1950s
Ealing Comedies production... rather than that Hollywood 'remake' of a
few years ago.

Even better is the 'outakes' reel from the Ladykillers which was
released on DVD a few years back - this has plenty more UK freight
action, all filmed on 35mm around the Kings Cross area of London. For
details of the inside of 16 ton steel minerals (a kind of 4-wheel
gondola with side and end doors, of which British Rail had almost a
quarter of a million built over a 10 year period from 1951) it's
priceless and the main inspiration for my 4mm:ft fleet of 30 (with
another 30 under build!).

I've used similar methods to weather up the interiors of my US HO gons -
overlaying washes of 'rust' on the floor and sides, starting with old,
dark rust, then successively lighter washes and finishing with some
scrapes and gouges done with artists chalk pastels - if I get time I'll
take some pics and post them in the files area.

Interestingly, the movie also inspired The Model Railway Club in London
to recreate the area the movie is set as a 2mm:ft finescale layout -
'Copenhagen Fields' - details and pics of which can be found here:
http://www.themodelrailwayclub.org/docs/copenhagenfields.htm One of the
scenes on the layout is that of Mrs Wilberforce's house, overlooking the
signal gantries from which the bodies of the gang were dropped into
empty coal trains!

Cheers,
Alan Monk,
London, UK

-----Original Message-----
From: timboconnor@...
Sent: 11 February 2008 20:49



Here's another movie to warm the hearts of steam era freight car
fans... "The Ladykillers". Ok, the freight cars are British, but
trains
play an important part in this movie and there are some
interesting
cargo ideas too.

Tim O'


.

<http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=2554753/grpspId=1705169725/m
sgId=69987/stime=1202762933/nc1=4767086/nc2=3848621/nc3=4025304>



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Re: 1930s train of coal hoppers - video anachronisms?

Jonathan Grant <jonagrant@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "pieter_roos" <pieter_roos@...> wrote:

1. It seems to me that there would be a lot less greenery between
the
tracks.

Will look into that. The layout represents a connecting/avoiding line
with only light to medium usage by through trains. I do however run
it intensively.



2. The water tower atop the building in the second scene looks a bit
too modern to me.

Concrete water tower? I'll investigate that as I'm not sure when they
started being used.




3. In the first scene, the amount of blue paint on signs and
building trim seems unlikely for the era.


Where's my black paint, I'm onto it.


Thanks Pieter,

Jon


Re: 1930s train of coal hoppers - video anachronisms?

Jonathan Grant <jonagrant@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "mcindoefalls" <mcindoefalls@...> wrote:
I think
that steel caboose is too new for the 30's, too. IIRC the first ones
were built in the early 40's. You'd probably want a wood caboose.


The steel caboose will have to stay for now, until I can get a wood
version scratchbuilt. Time is against me at the moment. I do have a
wood caboose lettered for Erie, but it is not an Erie design.

Jon


Re: 1930s train of coal hoppers - video anachronisms?

Jonathan Grant <jonagrant@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Scott Pitzer" <scottp459@...> wrote:

I'm sure the billboard italic WESTERN MARYLAND is too modern.

Thanks. The WM hopper will be re-assigned to the 1950s fleet of freight
cars.

Jon


Re: Information On Kalso Shops Kit

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I have built the Kaslo, Sylvan and Steam Shack (F&C) models of these
cars. CN had 10,000 of these cars built in the 503500-513499 series,
making it a car found everywhere on North American rails.

I rate the Kaslo the best because of the fit of its parts and what
you can do with the car. The etched stainless steel ladders are a
very nice piece of work! I am building a second car to represent a
1949 CC&F rebuild that replaced the Hutchins roof with a Standard
Railway Equipment diagonal-panel roof that used a four-board running
board as well. Stafford Swain's articles and Ted
Culotta's "Essential Freight Cars" article on these cars are very
useful.

The Steam Shack car was the first kit for these cars, but takes a
fair bit of work to assemble the body square, and the floor has some
height issues when mounted on trucks. Not sure why this is--does F&C
use generic floors for some car kits?

The Sylvan car has a nice one-piece body with nicely-executed board
detail and their own brake details, but as is sometimes the case with
one-piece bodies, the roof is not quite straight on the model that I
have built.

I have built these cars with both "K" and "AB" brakes. Rob Kirkham's
mention of the travelling sheave handbrake rigging (sort of a power
handbrake arrangment for stemwinders?) leads me to believe that it is
very similar to CN tank cars built around the same time that are
available in HO kit form from Pro Modelbuilders/NorWest Kits and
Castings of Vancouver, BC.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "parkvarieties"
<parkvarieties@...> wrote:

I just purchased a group of car kits from an individual which
includes
a Kelso Shops Distributing resin kit HK-10 for a 1929 CN single
sheath
box car, modernized version. I am not familiar with this company
which distributed the kit out of Coquitlam, BC, Canada. Can anyone
advise me on the accuracy of the model, level of detail and any
assembly problems you might have had? Thanks.
Frank Brua

127101 - 127120 of 196975