Date   

Re: [Fwd: Re: Spring South Eastern 08 RPM Meet]

mike turner <yardcoolieyahoo@...>
 

WARREN CALLOWAY wrote:
Mike,

I will have my photo CDs and prints for sale as well

Warren

miketurner@... wrote:
Lady & Gentlemen,
Yes, young Ruth Turner is on the above list.
The South Eastern RPM Meet 2008 will be held on March 28/29 at the old
ex Southern depot in downtown Greensboro, NC.
The specific room is the old coloreds only waiting room now named The
West Wing Extension.
Registration will open on Friday at 10 a.m. - Admission $25.00.
The official venue address is:
Rea Building
234 E. Washington St
Greensboro, NC.
Here we will have our displays, vendor tables and demonstrations.
Our weekend will be hosted by the Carolina Model Railroaders (CMR).
Their club rooms are virtually next door to the display room.
Here we will be holding our clinics and the line up is:
Commencing at 1.00 p.m. on Friday.....four clinics will be given. On
Saturday we will have our first clinic of another four, starting at 9 a.m.
Clinic subjects are:
Building your own detailed turnouts - Tony Sissons
Modeling Santa Fe's Alma (KS) Branch - Researching a Piece of the
Prototype - Jared Harper
Building an etch brass signal kit - The pitfalls of soldering - Mike Turner
Resin Kits - What's available in the marketplace & building a resin
"flat" kit - step by step - Kevin von der Lippe
Model photography - John Schneider
Building a Norfolk Southern C39-8. A difficult cut & shut kit bash
explained by - James Wall
DT&I 2nd Generation Diesels and how to model them - Brian Everett
Building the Wright Trak Radio Car - Bob Harpe
Steam 101: A Short Course for the Steam Modeler on Identifying Valve
Gear, Air Pumps, Feedwater Heaters and other Details of Steam
Locomotives - Jason Greene
Installing a Tsunami Decoder in a Heavy Steam Locomotive. Rick Bell
We will also have a slideshow conducted by Bob Graham with able
assistance from Warren Calloway. Whatever these two guys dig
out from their archives, I guarantee it will be good,
it always is...!! This slideshow will be held after supper,
kinda eight till late, although it is scheduled to start at just after 7
p.m.
Demonstrations:
What...? Yep, as an additional attraction we will have
three modeling demonstrations running throughout the duration of the
meet. Here you can sit, watch and discuss with the modelers
who will be making/building something that interests them, probably for
their own personal layouts, now or for the future. Rather than just
looking at a finished model it an be far more interesting
to sit, relax and watch someone in the middle of their model, mistakes
and all, right in front of your eyes. You may even learn some new and
different modeling techniques.
Other interesting diversions:
Southern Railway Historical Society.
Door prizes, given we all contribute to make that happen, so bring along
something please..?
We will have a set up so that you can have your model photographed
against a set scene under the lights.
I am still waiting to receive word from several other possible
participating historical societies.
Vendors:
Tichy Trains
Railflyer Models
DCC Installs
I am still waiting to receive word from several other
possible participating vendors.
Hotel Details:
Quality Inn & Suites
120 Seneca Road
I-40/BUS. 85 Exit 37
Greensboro, NC. 27406
Phone: 336.275.9575
email: _midtowngso@... <mailto:midtowngso@...>_
Please quote "RPM Meet" to get the room rate of $62.99/night. If the
person on the front desk has difficulty understanding you, start
speaking Spanish...!!
The Pre-registration form is attached as a PDF file. Please download it
and mail it with your check or money order to Ruth Turner, address is on
the form.
Please let all your RPM friends know of this alternative RPM meet to
what was going to be Savannah, GA. Look forward to the support and
seeing everyone there and
please watch for further updates. Feel free to forward this message to
those you think may be interested.
Thanks and cheers,
Tony Sissons


[Fwd: Re: Spring South Eastern 08 RPM Meet]

miketurner@ieee.org <yardcoolieyahoo@...>
 

Lady & Gentlemen,

Yes, young Ruth Turner is on the above list.

The South Eastern RPM Meet 2008 will be held on March 28/29 at the old
ex Southern depot in downtown Greensboro, NC.
The specific room is the old coloreds only waiting room now named The
West Wing Extension.

Registration will open on Friday at 10 a.m. - Admission $25.00.

The official venue address is:
Rea Building
234 E. Washington St
Greensboro, NC.

Here we will have our displays, vendor tables and demonstrations.

Our weekend will be hosted by the Carolina Model Railroaders (CMR).
Their club rooms are virtually next door to the display room.
Here we will be holding our clinics and the line up is:

Commencing at 1.00 p.m. on Friday.....four clinics will be given. On
Saturday we will have our first clinic of another four, starting at 9 a.m.

Clinic subjects are:

Building your own detailed turnouts - Tony Sissons
Modeling Santa Fe's Alma (KS) Branch - Researching a Piece of the
Prototype - Jared Harper
Building an etch brass signal kit - The pitfalls of soldering - Mike Turner
Resin Kits - What's available in the marketplace & building a resin
"flat" kit - step by step - Kevin von der Lippe
Model photography - John Schneider
Building a Norfolk Southern C39-8. A difficult cut & shut kit bash
explained by - James Wall
DT&I 2nd Generation Diesels and how to model them - Brian Everett
Building the Wright Trak Radio Car - Bob Harpe
Steam 101: A Short Course for the Steam Modeler on Identifying Valve
Gear, Air Pumps, Feedwater Heaters and other Details of Steam
Locomotives - Jason Greene
Installing a Tsunami Decoder in a Heavy Steam Locomotive. Rick Bell

We will also have a slideshow conducted by Bob Graham with able
assistance from Warren Calloway. Whatever these two guys dig
out from their archives, I guarantee it will be good,
it always is...!! This slideshow will be held after supper,
kinda eight till late, although it is scheduled to start at just after 7
p.m.

Demonstrations:

What...? Yep, as an additional attraction we will have
three modeling demonstrations running throughout the duration of the
meet. Here you can sit, watch and discuss with the modelers
who will be making/building something that interests them, probably for
their own personal layouts, now or for the future. Rather than just
looking at a finished model it an be far more interesting
to sit, relax and watch someone in the middle of their model, mistakes
and all, right in front of your eyes. You may even learn some new and
different modeling techniques.

Other interesting diversions:

Southern Railway Historical Society.
Door prizes, given we all contribute to make that happen, so bring along
something please..?
We will have a set up so that you can have your model photographed
against a set scene under the lights.
I am still waiting to receive word from several other possible
participating historical societies.

Vendors:

Tichy Trains
Railflyer Models
DCC Installs
I am still waiting to receive word from several other
possible participating vendors.

Hotel Details:

Quality Inn & Suites
120 Seneca Road
I-40/BUS. 85 Exit 37
Greensboro, NC. 27406

Phone: 336.275.9575
email: _midtowngso@... <mailto:midtowngso@...>_

Please quote "RPM Meet" to get the room rate of $62.99/night. If the
person on the front desk has difficulty understanding you, start
speaking Spanish...!!

The Pre-registration form is attached as a PDF file. Please download it
and mail it with your check or money order to Ruth Turner, address is on
the form.

Please let all your RPM friends know of this alternative RPM meet to
what was going to be Savannah, GA. Look forward to the support and
seeing everyone there and
please watch for further updates. Feel free to forward this message to
those you think may be interested.

Thanks and cheers,
Tony Sissons


Re: Do Not Hump Signs

Greg Martin
 

Rob Gross writes:




"Were the "Do Not Hump" signs a standard sign or did each railroad
have their own font and style?

Robert Gross

---

.

Rob,

The shipper supplied the DO NOT HUMP placards and were a good source of
shipper advertising. We have a great collection stapled to the wall at work in
the warehouse. Neat to stand back an review.

Also the shippers bill of lading for was coded for shipments that were
clearly marked DO NOT HUMP and recorded on the waybill. I am sure there were
plenty of claims settled because crews didn't read the placards or the special
instructions.


Greg Martin








**************The year's hottest artists on the red carpet at the Grammy
Awards. Go to AOL Music.
(http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)


Re: Do Not Hump Signs

Dennis Williams
 

A lot of railroads did not care about the signs.
They even humped cars they were not supposed to.
I worked in Conway when the NS took over and watched
them hump loaded auto racks with costly results. They
did this for a couple of days B4 they got the idea.
Personal opinion, it was on purpose. One car had, note
the word had, high end SUVs in and now out of it.
My job was a conductor. Imagine walking back through
the yard at 2:00am and finding a rack with end doors
burst open and autos hanging out. This was 1 of 6
cars, if I am correct, that they humped. The insurance
claims were outstanding!
So guys, If you wish to throw a wrench into the
works, hump those racks and tie up that yard for a
day. That will make youe conductor very happy! Dennis

--- Robert Gross <betazeta144@...> wrote:

Were the "Do Not Hump" signs a standard sign or did
each railriad
have their own font and style?

Robert Gross


--- In STMFC@..., "Robert" <riverob@...>
wrote:

I'm not sure where the "do not hump" rule was
written. But yes,
any
official could have nailed the yardmaster and
switchcrew for
humping
a DNH car. Especially if freight was damaged or
nearby schools
evacuated due to ammonia fumes. Bad PR, very bad.

BUT, it was the terminal trainmasters who (nudge
nudge wink wink)
urged expediency and smiled on high car counts.

Indeed we did some stupid, dangerous things.

Two cars per minute for flat switching sounds
about right, but that
includes reaching in for the occasional car that
stops short,
stopping to clear up a misprint or to ask the YM a
question, etc.
When things were going smoothly with an "in sync"
crew, you'd see
four cars or rolling down the lead & into their
tracks at the same
time. Everyone had to be on the same page as it
required thinking
ahead about where the field men needed to be in
order to catch cars
down the tracks. If they had to cross-over cuts,
etc. No one
wanted
to line a car into an empty track without someone
on the brake
(first
car into an empty track got a handbrake test
before being cut
off).
The engineer would also be synced with the
foreman/pinpuller's hand
signals, almost to the point of anticipating his
signals. Hand
signals would be prefered over radio, limiting the
length of the
cut
to due to visibility. A good switchman / engineer
combo working
together was almost like the switchman having his
hand on a no-lag
throttle & brake.

There were fixed tension retarders at the far end
of the bowl, not
skates. They kept cars in the bowl unless you
pushed or pulled
them
out. More or less. Squealed badly.

I don't know why the East Yard retarders had so
many problems, but
crossed drawbars, broken knuckles, and thunderous
joints were
common.

I meant 3 or 4 man switch crews, not including
engineer. Just
switchmen. And by men I mean mean person, as
there were a few
women
switchpersons & engineers by the late '70s. But
switchperson
sounds
funny.

Rob Simpson



--- In STMFC@..., Malcolm Laughlin
<mlaughlinnyc@>
wrote:

Posted by: "Robert" > I believe the rulebook
says "do not
hump"
means do not let car roll
free.

That was a UP rule and not a general railroad
rule. Was that
actually in the book of operating rules, or was it
the procedures
for
particular yards ?

Something else that makes me curious is that
UP president John
Kenefick came from the NYC, as VPO, where I
believe he was one of
the
officials who would have gone up in smoke if yard
crews had given
those cars special handling.

> The hump retarders were more often than not
out of
calibration
or otherwise not working properly. Not uncommon
for cars to hit
standing cuts way too hard or to leave cars
fouling other tracks.

That sounds like apretty poor operation. Did
they neglect
putting the skates on the far end of the bowl
tracks ? I've been
in
enough hump towers on different railroads to think
that what you
describe is not usual.

A good crew could flat switch a cut almost as
fast as the hump,

The best I've ever heard of for a flat yard,
and that a well-
designed new yard, is two cars per minute, unless
there are a lot
of
multiple car cuts. A hump can get up to four cars
a minute when
operation is going well and shouldn't fall below
three. Of course
they couldn't do that all day because the
constraint in a hump yard
is the building of outbound trains.

> but that usually meant a four-person crew
vs. three on the
hump.

In the steam era, even through at least the
early 70's, it was
all five man crews.




Malcolm Laughlin, Editor
617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478



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Re: Do Not Hump Signs

Robert Gross
 

Were the "Do Not Hump" signs a standard sign or did each railriad
have their own font and style?

Robert Gross


--- In STMFC@..., "Robert" <riverob@...> wrote:

I'm not sure where the "do not hump" rule was written. But yes,
any
official could have nailed the yardmaster and switchcrew for
humping
a DNH car. Especially if freight was damaged or nearby schools
evacuated due to ammonia fumes. Bad PR, very bad.

BUT, it was the terminal trainmasters who (nudge nudge wink wink)
urged expediency and smiled on high car counts.

Indeed we did some stupid, dangerous things.

Two cars per minute for flat switching sounds about right, but that
includes reaching in for the occasional car that stops short,
stopping to clear up a misprint or to ask the YM a question, etc.
When things were going smoothly with an "in sync" crew, you'd see
four cars or rolling down the lead & into their tracks at the same
time. Everyone had to be on the same page as it required thinking
ahead about where the field men needed to be in order to catch cars
down the tracks. If they had to cross-over cuts, etc. No one
wanted
to line a car into an empty track without someone on the brake
(first
car into an empty track got a handbrake test before being cut
off).
The engineer would also be synced with the foreman/pinpuller's hand
signals, almost to the point of anticipating his signals. Hand
signals would be prefered over radio, limiting the length of the
cut
to due to visibility. A good switchman / engineer combo working
together was almost like the switchman having his hand on a no-lag
throttle & brake.

There were fixed tension retarders at the far end of the bowl, not
skates. They kept cars in the bowl unless you pushed or pulled
them
out. More or less. Squealed badly.

I don't know why the East Yard retarders had so many problems, but
crossed drawbars, broken knuckles, and thunderous joints were
common.

I meant 3 or 4 man switch crews, not including engineer. Just
switchmen. And by men I mean mean person, as there were a few
women
switchpersons & engineers by the late '70s. But switchperson
sounds
funny.

Rob Simpson



--- In STMFC@..., Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@>
wrote:

Posted by: "Robert" > I believe the rulebook says "do not
hump"
means do not let car roll
free.

That was a UP rule and not a general railroad rule. Was that
actually in the book of operating rules, or was it the procedures
for
particular yards ?

Something else that makes me curious is that UP president John
Kenefick came from the NYC, as VPO, where I believe he was one of
the
officials who would have gone up in smoke if yard crews had given
those cars special handling.

> The hump retarders were more often than not out of
calibration
or otherwise not working properly. Not uncommon for cars to hit
standing cuts way too hard or to leave cars fouling other tracks.

That sounds like apretty poor operation. Did they neglect
putting the skates on the far end of the bowl tracks ? I've been
in
enough hump towers on different railroads to think that what you
describe is not usual.

A good crew could flat switch a cut almost as fast as the hump,
The best I've ever heard of for a flat yard, and that a well-
designed new yard, is two cars per minute, unless there are a lot
of
multiple car cuts. A hump can get up to four cars a minute when
operation is going well and shouldn't fall below three. Of course
they couldn't do that all day because the constraint in a hump yard
is the building of outbound trains.

> but that usually meant a four-person crew vs. three on the
hump.

In the steam era, even through at least the early 70's, it was
all five man crews.




Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Illinios Central Furfural cars

feddersenmark
 

In 1950 & 1951 the IC converted three triple bay coal hoppers from
series 81000-81744 to covered hoppers numbered 81750-81752 for shipment
of furfural (in this case, finely ground corn cobs probably used for
making plastics). The diagram sheet for these cars shows about a two
foot extension added to the sides and tapered steel roof without
hatches. A side door about 2'high x 3'wide was located near the top
center of the side for loading. The cars were marked for loading at
Quaker Oats Co. Cedar Rapids, IA. Supposedly, there is a builders type
photo of these cars out there somewhere. Does anyone know of a source
for this or other photos of these cars? Needed for modeling and
decals. Thank you Mark


Re: Do Not Hump Signs pt. II

Robert <riverob@...>
 

Malcolm,

Another reason why hump yards could switch more cars per hour than a
flat (actually very slightly downhill in my case) yard is that you
could hump a 120-plus car cut in one take while flat switching became
less efficient over 30 or 40 cars due to slack action and then
visibility problems.

Rob Simpson


Re: Do Not Hump Signs

Robert <riverob@...>
 

I'm not sure where the "do not hump" rule was written. But yes, any
official could have nailed the yardmaster and switchcrew for humping
a DNH car. Especially if freight was damaged or nearby schools
evacuated due to ammonia fumes. Bad PR, very bad.

BUT, it was the terminal trainmasters who (nudge nudge wink wink)
urged expediency and smiled on high car counts.

Indeed we did some stupid, dangerous things.

Two cars per minute for flat switching sounds about right, but that
includes reaching in for the occasional car that stops short,
stopping to clear up a misprint or to ask the YM a question, etc.
When things were going smoothly with an "in sync" crew, you'd see
four cars or rolling down the lead & into their tracks at the same
time. Everyone had to be on the same page as it required thinking
ahead about where the field men needed to be in order to catch cars
down the tracks. If they had to cross-over cuts, etc. No one wanted
to line a car into an empty track without someone on the brake (first
car into an empty track got a handbrake test before being cut off).
The engineer would also be synced with the foreman/pinpuller's hand
signals, almost to the point of anticipating his signals. Hand
signals would be prefered over radio, limiting the length of the cut
to due to visibility. A good switchman / engineer combo working
together was almost like the switchman having his hand on a no-lag
throttle & brake.

There were fixed tension retarders at the far end of the bowl, not
skates. They kept cars in the bowl unless you pushed or pulled them
out. More or less. Squealed badly.

I don't know why the East Yard retarders had so many problems, but
crossed drawbars, broken knuckles, and thunderous joints were common.

I meant 3 or 4 man switch crews, not including engineer. Just
switchmen. And by men I mean mean person, as there were a few women
switchpersons & engineers by the late '70s. But switchperson sounds
funny.

Rob Simpson



--- In STMFC@..., Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
wrote:

Posted by: "Robert" > I believe the rulebook says "do not hump"
means do not let car roll
free.

That was a UP rule and not a general railroad rule. Was that
actually in the book of operating rules, or was it the procedures for
particular yards ?

Something else that makes me curious is that UP president John
Kenefick came from the NYC, as VPO, where I believe he was one of the
officials who would have gone up in smoke if yard crews had given
those cars special handling.

> The hump retarders were more often than not out of calibration
or otherwise not working properly. Not uncommon for cars to hit
standing cuts way too hard or to leave cars fouling other tracks.

That sounds like apretty poor operation. Did they neglect
putting the skates on the far end of the bowl tracks ? I've been in
enough hump towers on different railroads to think that what you
describe is not usual.

A good crew could flat switch a cut almost as fast as the hump,
The best I've ever heard of for a flat yard, and that a well-
designed new yard, is two cars per minute, unless there are a lot of
multiple car cuts. A hump can get up to four cars a minute when
operation is going well and shouldn't fall below three. Of course
they couldn't do that all day because the constraint in a hump yard
is the building of outbound trains.

> but that usually meant a four-person crew vs. three on the
hump.

In the steam era, even through at least the early 70's, it was
all five man crews.




Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Champ Decal Wanted

golden1014
 

Gentlemen,

I'm looking for decals to finish an HO scale Red
Caboose meat reefer. Does anybody have the Rath reefer
set? I think it might be HR-51. If so, and if you can
let them go, please contact me off-line at
Golden1014@.... Thanks!

John


John Golden
Bloomington, IN

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014
http://s-clmodeler.aclsal.org/currentissue/s-clmodeler2008-1.pdf


Re: Atlas trucks

Jonathan Grant <jonagrant@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@...> wrote:

Here's some railroads that had some cabooses with the upcoming TMW
caboose
truck: Belt Railway of Chicago,


Brian,

you've got my interest already. When will the trucks become
available? I have a few BRC cabooses just waiting for them to appear

http://www.trainboard.com/railimages/showphoto.php/photo/11252


If they're half as good as the 50t Dalman trucks, I'll be a very
happy bunny.

Jon


Correct HO caboose trucks for Wabash steel cabooses

reporterllc
 

Someone came out with these in the past year I think. Does anyone know
the name of the supplier?

I plan on going to the Ann Arbor, Michgian train show this weekend and
would like to pick some up if anyone has them. (Incidentally, I note
that Funaro & Camerlingo will be there.)

Thanks in advance
Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana


Re: Do Not Hump Signs

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Posted by: "Robert" > I believe the rulebook says "do not hump" means do not let car roll
free.

That was a UP rule and not a general railroad rule. Was that actually in the book of operating rules, or was it the procedures for particular yards ?

Something else that makes me curious is that UP president John Kenefick came from the NYC, as VPO, where I believe he was one of the officials who would have gone up in smoke if yard crews had given those cars special handling.

> The hump retarders were more often than not out of calibration or otherwise not working properly. Not uncommon for cars to hit standing cuts way too hard or to leave cars fouling other tracks.

That sounds like apretty poor operation. Did they neglect putting the skates on the far end of the bowl tracks ? I've been in enough hump towers on different railroads to think that what you describe is not usual.

A good crew could flat switch a cut almost as fast as the hump,
The best I've ever heard of for a flat yard, and that a well-designed new yard, is two cars per minute, unless there are a lot of multiple car cuts. A hump can get up to four cars a minute when operation is going well and shouldn't fall below three. Of course they couldn't do that all day because the constraint in a hump yard is the building of outbound trains.

> but that usually meant a four-person crew vs. three on the hump.

In the steam era, even through at least the early 70's, it was all five man crews.




Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: more movies

tbarney2004
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Carl J. Marsico" <Carlmarsico@...> wrote:

HBO did a movie about Pancho Villa with plenty of era-inappropriate
freight cars. I don't recall the specific "violations", but I won't
forget the look on my wife's face when I pointed them out...

CJM
The errors in the movie "Rudy" were just as bad...even though a few
years late for this list, the string of Conrail hoppers (quite a few
freshly painted too) rolling by in a scene set in a steel mill in the
mid 60's was a very glaring example of how hollywood can't get it
right these days. I mean, they couldn't find a string of 2 bay STMFC
era cars anywhere? Not even 2 or 3? (Required content)

Tim Barney


N&W Peaked end fishbelly hoppers

Bill Navari
 

just a head's up...

For those of you who pre-ordered our special run twelve pack of Stewart 2
bay N&W pe fishbelly hoppers, they arrived today from Bowser and will begin
shipping tomorrow!

For those who didn't preorder...only a few sets left! email me if interested!

Thanks,
Bill
_bessemerhobbies@... (mailto:bessemerhobbies@...)

OUR NEW WEBSITE:

_www.bessemerhobby.com_ (http://www.bessemerhobby.com)






**************The year's hottest artists on the red carpet at the Grammy
Awards. Go to AOL Music.
(http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)


Re: Atlas trucks

Brian Leppert <b.leppert@...>
 

Jim,

Replacing all your trucks sounds like a great idea to me (VBG). My new caboose truck is appropriate for both the NE-5 and NE-6 New Haven cabooses.
There is no web site--yet.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

.----- Original Message -----
From: "James Fellows" <jamesfellows@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 12, 2008 4:18 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Atlas trucks


Does this mean I need to swap out all the trucks under my Atlas models of the NH NE-6s I have? Does Tahoe Model Works have a web site?

Thanks,

Jim Fellows


Re: Photo sources?

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Friends,

At the risk of tooting my own horn, the story of the Sacramento Northern's interchange freight cars can be found at: http://people.virginia.edu/~ggg9y/freight.html . Also of interest are some features on older cars (some not in interchange) at http://people.virginia.edu/~ggg9y/boxcar.html and http://people.virginia.edu/~ggg9y/nebox.html .

You might also take a look at my WP/SN/TS car list, which includes notes on correct models and decals for the 1950s: http://people.virginia.edu/~ggg9y/wp.html .

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Richard Hendrickson wrote:

On Feb 12, 2008, at 5:00 PM, destron@... wrote:


....I would guess that the freight equipment of the electric/interurban
roads would fall within the scope of this list? The interurban era did
overlap with the steam era...
I can't imagine any objection to including the freight equipment owned by electric/interurban railways, especially since the freight cars of several such railways were in interchange service and thus could (and often did) turn up on steam railways, sometimes quite distant from their home rails. Examples that immediately come to mind are the freight cars of the Illinois Terminal, Pacific Electric, and Sacramento Northern.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Photo sources?

Tony Thompson
 

Jim Harr wrote:
Apologies for the very delayed (and lengthy) reply, but I was just this past weekend leafing through my copy of 'The Insull Chicago Interurbans' by Gordon Lloyd (Morning Sun, 1996). This book has, on p. 54, a photo of a North Shore flat car that the author describes as "a flat car used in the first TOFC service in the country" . . .
Unlikely. Jack White's book provides documentation of piggyback before 1850. Sometimes people who make such claims mean "modern TOFC," in which case you can define "modern" to suit the example you want to promote. To choose but a single example, a Key System predecessor was offering regular transportation of farmer's wagons on flat cars in 1894 (see our recent Key book, p. 70). Whether the North Shore example "really was first" is, of course, open to some debate.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Photo sources?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 12, 2008, at 5:00 PM, destron@... wrote:

....I would guess that the freight equipment of the electric/interurban
roads would fall within the scope of this list? The interurban era did
overlap with the steam era...
I can't imagine any objection to including the freight equipment owned
by electric/interurban railways, especially since the freight cars of
several such railways were in interchange service and thus could (and
often did) turn up on steam railways, sometimes quite distant from
their home rails. Examples that immediately come to mind are the
freight cars of the Illinois Terminal, Pacific Electric, and Sacramento
Northern.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Do Not Hump Signs

Robert <riverob@...>
 

I believe the rulebook says "do not hump" means do not let car roll
free. Regardless of the retarder quality. (At least when I worked
the UP's East Yard hump 18 years in the future, '78-'84) Cars
placarded "do not hump" were to be shoved to a joint with a yard
brakeman on the point. Nevertheless, in the name of expediency the
yardmasters would sometimes let DNH cars roll free. I saw loaded
ammonia cars(!), unknown DOT placarded tank cars, and an NW2 let roll
free. The endplate of the NW2 caught on the mechanism of the first
retarder, coming to an instant stop. I think it put the retarder out
of service, but I can't remember. It should not have went over the
hump...too low.

The hump retarders were more often than not out of calibration or
otherwise not working properly. Not uncommon for cars to hit
standing cuts way too hard or to leave cars fouling other tracks.

A good crew could flat switch a cut almost as fast as the hump, but
that usually meant a four-person crew vs. three on the hump. (Steam
era cars with high mounted brakes afforded a great view of the yard.)

Rob Simpson


--- In STMFC@..., Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
wrote:

Note that "do not hump" signs don't necessarily mean a car didn't
go over the hump. With the advent of "electronic yards" in the late
50's when computer control of retarders was introduced, hump yards
had much better control of car speeds. On the NYC we ignored those
placards at the new yards because it was thought that there was less
risk of unacceptable coupling speed than in a flat yard.

Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Photo sources?

destron@...
 

Jim,

Thanks for that great tip; though Chicago isn't quite "a ride on the
'lectric" away from S. C., I'll definitely keep an eye out for this one.

Though I would guess that the freight equipment of the electric/interurban
roads would fall within the scope of this list? The interurban era did
overlap with the steam era...

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Frank and list;

Apologies for the very delayed (and lengthy) reply, but I was just
this past weekend leafing through my copy of 'The Insull Chicago
Interurbans' by Gordon Lloyd (Morning Sun, 1996). This book has, on
p. 54, a photo of a North Shore flat car that the author describes
as "a flat car used in the first TOFC service in the country"; on p.
80 is a North Shore weed-sprayer set that contains some single-dome
tank cars of unknown (to me, at least) provenance; and, on pp. 90-91,
some color photos of CSS gondolas during the steam era, and some
other cars from past the steam era (and the focus of this list).

And, looking a little further down your list, I consulted 'Trackside
Around Scranton 1952-1976' by Ed Miller (Morning Sun, 1999). This
book has a chapter called 'Ed Miller's Own Railroad' about the
Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley (The Laurel Line) with photos of some
positively ancient wooden side-dump ash cars (p. 67) and some other
equally ancient work equipment (p. 77). One other photo of note to
steam-era freight car enthusiasts is the 1952 photo on p. 123 of
three of the Waddell Coal Mining Co. two-bay hoppers in their bright
orange livery. My heavens...

To the list in general, while I fully realize that books about
interurbans and trolley lines are not the focus of this list, I would
humbly suggest that these portions of the Morning Sun catalog not be
overlooked for Steam-era content. You might be amazed at what you
will find in these great books. They contain some incredible scenes
of life in the 40's and 50's, when advertising signs were made of
wood, steel and glass, and NOT plastic! Plus, there are very often
some fantastic freight car sightings as well!

Respectfully;

Jim Harr
1955 Lackawanna modeler and closet trolley enthusiast



--- In STMFC@..., destron@... wrote:


Well, a long shot, but worth asking...

Does anyone know where I might find photos of freight equipment
(pref.
late 40s, early 50s, interchanged or not) of the roads in the list
to
follow?

The why for this, in case anyone wonders how I put this list of
obscurities together... more than anything else, my interest is
electrified freight railways. And as exceptionally unlikely to have
happened as it is, I'd like to at least in model form make a train
consisting of cars exclusively from electrified railways. :)

Thanks.
Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Butte, Anaconda & Pacific (only 2561-2655 srs)
Cedar Rapids & Iowa City
Central California Traction
Chicago, Aurora & Elgin
Chicago, North Shore & Milwaukee
Chicago, South Shore & South Bend
Des Moines & Central Iowa
Detroit & Toledo Shore Line
Hutchinson & Northern
Kansas City, Kaw Valley
Kansas City Public Service Co.
Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley
London & Port Stanley
Mason City & Clear Lake
Potomac Edison Co. / Hagerstown & Frederick
Quebec Railway, Light & Power
St. Louis & Belleville Electric
Toledo & Eastern
Tulsa-Sapulpa Union Railway
Warwick Railway (Rhode Island)
Waterloo, Cedar Falls & Northern
Yakima Valley Transportation
Youngstown & Southern

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