Date   

Re: 1940s tank car questions

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

During WWII tractors ran on a very low grade of fuel. I'd have to
go
to my notes to tell you what it was called. The octane was
slightly
higher than kerosene.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA
More cars from the Fairfax Agent's seal book. I don't know how badly
Yahoo format will screw the columns up.

DATE TRAIN NO. INTIALS NUMBER CONTENTS
BUSINESS
3/17/1947 73 UTLX 20748 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
5/27/1947 99 DRX 6114 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
5/27/1947 99 UTLX 21364 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
6/10/1947 99 AHPX 9055 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
6/18/1947 73 UTLX 5690 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
6/23/1947 73 ARKX 217 DISTILLATE CITY
7/2/1947 73 NATX 16743 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
7/4/1947 73 ARKX 209 DISTILLATE CITY
7/8/1947 99 DRX 6112 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
7/14/1947 73 ARKX 206 DISTILLATE CITY
7/18/1947 73 SHPX 10524 DISTILLATE CITY
7/23/1947 73 GATX 14620 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
7/30/1947 73 ARKX 207 DISTILLATE CITY
8/9/1947 72 SHPX 484 DISTILLATE CITY
8/18/1947 73 UTLX 18605 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
9/2/1947 73 UTLX 6470 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
9/2/1947 73 UTLX 8478 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
9/3/1947 99 UTLX 74186 DISTILLATE STANDARD OIL
9/11/1947 X620 SHPX 21793 DISTILLATE CITY
9/17/1947 73 UTLX 77249 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
9/22/1947 73 CSOX 1130 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
9/22/1947 73 UTLX 21916 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
9/24/1947 99 UTLX 15609 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
9/27/1947 99 UTLX 20018 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
10/1/1947 73 SHPX 10529 DISTILLATE CITY
10/10/1947 99 WEOX 615 DISTILLATE BUERKLE OIL
10/14/1947 99 GATX 86 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
10/20/1947 73 DRX 6277 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
10/24/1947 99 ARKX 210 DISTILLATE CITY
10/31/1947 99 UTLX 11813 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
11/3/1947 73 KOTX 501 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
11/5/1947 73 SHPX 10574 DISTILLATE CITY
11/7/1947 73 CONX 3528 DISTILLATE CITY
11/14/1947 73 CONX 3545 DISTILLATE CITY
11/14/1947 73 LUX 1114 DISTILLATE CITY
11/14/1947 73 LUX 253 DISTILLATE CITY
11/19/1947 73 PECX 873 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
11/21/1947 73 SHPX 21931 DISTILLATE CITY
11/21/1947 73 UTLX 20701 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
11/25/1947 X547 UTLX 7048 DISTILLATE BUERKLE OIL
12/5/1947 99 UTLX 21315 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
12/19/1947 99 KOTX 882 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
12/20/1947 99 SHPX 21692 DISTILLATE CITY
12/23/1947 99 UTLX 15772 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
12/27/1947 99 KOTX 8251 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
12/31/1947 73 UTLX 21307 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
1/8/1948 99 ARKX 201 DISTILLATE CITY
1/19/1948 73 UTLX 11357 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
1/24/1948 99 SHPX 10524 DISTILLATE CITY
1/27/1948 99 UTLX 15197 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
1/27/1948 99 UTLX 76499 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
2/2/1948 73 GATX 67 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
2/3/1948 99 SHPX 4197 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
2/3/1948 99 SHPX 10565 DISTILLATE CITY
2/16/1948 73 RUTX 8062 DISTILLATE VILLAGE
2/16/1948 73 UTLX 6622 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
2/16/1948 73 UTLX 76464 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
2/27/1948 99 SHPX 21149 DISTILLATE CITY
2/28/1948 99 ROTX 8107 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
3/2/1948 99 SRX 6611 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
3/13/1948 99 SHPX 21616 DISTILLATE CITY
3/17/1948 73 ARKX 222 DISTILLATE CITY
3/19/1948 73 ARKX 224 DISTILLATE LIGHT PLANT
3/23/1948 99 PECX 182 DISTILLATE CITY
4/1/1948 99 OZKX 237 DISTILLATE ?
4/5/1948 99 UTLX DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
4/7/1948 99 ARKX 201 DISTILLATE LIGHT PLANT
4/19/1948 73 CSOX 5427 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
4/19/1948 73 EORX 5269 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
4/21/1948 99 ARKX 210 DISTILLATE CITY
4/30/1948 ? ARKX 215 DISTILLATE CITY
4/30/1948 ? GATX 5546 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
5/3/1948 73 UTLX 21401 DISTILLATE FULLERTON OIL
5/10/1948 ? ARKX 217 DISTILLATE CITY
5/10/1948 ? KOTX 8703 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
5/12/1948 99 DRX 6561 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
5/21/1948 73 DRX 6437 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
5/25/1948 99 NATX 5050 DISTILLATE CITY
5/25/1948 99 SHPX 10579 DISTILLATE CITY
5/29/1948 99 ARKX 203 DISTILLATE CITY
5/29/1948 99 NATX 3728 DISTILLATE DITTMER OIL
6/4/1948 73 NATX 5750 DISTILLATE LIGHT PLANT
6/14/1948 73 LUX 850 DISTILLATE CITY
6/16/1948 73 CSOX 4150 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
6/16/1948 73 EORX 6387 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
6/19/1948 73 PECX 105 DISTILLATE CITY
6/28/1948 73 LUX 891 DISTILLATE CITY
7/5/1948 73 LUX 279 DISTILLATE CITIES SERVICE
7/14/1948 73 KOTX 8138 DISTILLATE KIECKER
BROTHERS OIL
7/14/1948 73 LUX 850 DISTILLATE CITY


Re: 1940s tank car questions

Jim Ogden
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as
they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed
Hi Ed,

Like most early tractors, Ford's 9N and its successor the (virutally
identical for modeling purposes) postwar 8N both had gasoline engines
( a newer model often had a lower number number in typcial Henry Ford
logic). They could be worked on by a shadetree mechanic more easily
than a diesel.

I'm fairly many farmers would go to a trackside fuel dealer (rather
than a team track) most Saturdays (often their only weekly trip into
town) to fill up gas cans to take back to the farm since the fuel
consumption on these tractors on a 40 acre farm was not that much and
you didn't plow every day. I'd get one of the Athearn model A Ford
trucks and have HO military style war surplus gas cans or 55 gallon
oil drums. Often the fuel dealer was the same outfit who sold seed
in the spring, supplies, new plow blades and even acted as brokers for
mules or new tractors. So I doubt the team track idea would be that
common, but a tiny unloading facility with tanks for diesel, gasoline,
and heating oil would not take up too much space on a layout.

Eventually most got their own fuel tanks on their farms and ordered
tax-exempt gasoline which had a dye added so the state could see if
anyone were putting this fuel in their automobiles. You could order
LP gas, gasoline, oil, or diesel from the same fuel dealer and have it
delivered just like in the big cities where people ordered heating oil
for an underground tank.

From what I understand, a lot of local grain co-ops after WWII would
order tank cars of LP gas and there would be a spike in LP gas (or
heating oil in the midwest) in winter. I am fairly certain the dye
fwas added to "refund" gasoline for farm equipment at the fuel dealer.

Jim "Mr. Green Jeans" Ogden
Fort Worth, Texas


Re: Perishable LCL?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From Larry Jackman

One thing to note. The closer you are to grower the poorer your
[produce will be. When you ship some thing across the country and pay
the freight rates charged you want to get the best price you can. You
ship your very best and get top dollar and that leaves the not so
good for the locals.
You do not believe me???? Go to the east cost and buy your California
produce. You have never seen anything that good in California unless
the seller is a local and does not ship any thing.
Uh, no, Larry, not so.

I lived in San Francisco, Pacific Heights, and we had a small local grocery store with the most
exquisite fruits and vegetables. Here in Massachusetts, well, it just isn't the same, not at all.

One of my highlight memories of California was visiting a friend's family near Fresno, eating
strawberries directly from the plant. We were at the end of the field the pickers were working,
they were working toward us. Absolute perfection!

SGL


Re: 1940s tank car questions

Earl Tuson
 

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?
As has already been said, most agricultural tractors built during the period of this list had gasoline motors, which could alternatively run on tractor fuel a.k.a 'distillate' a.k.a tractor vaporising oil (TVO.) However, many early tractors were designed to run on kerosene, and this remained an option for some years. "All fuel" motors were designed to run on any of these fuels. Distillate and kerosene availabilty and use as a motor fuel waned after WW-II, for pricing and technological reasons. Other tractors were equipped for running on propane.

A neighbor purchased a diesel Farmall "M" (like the Sunshine kit) in
1948 but that was quite unusual.�� Allis Chalmers did not indroduce a
diesel farm tractor until 1953 or 54.��
Farmall initially offered a diesel motor in their model MD, with the first one built 1/3/41. Even so, you would still start the motor on gas from a small auxillary tank, and then manually switch it over to diesel. They weren't exceptionally popular (they can be considered rare today.) If you care for numbers, production quantiies for most tractors by year can be found online. There were no "compact diesel" tractors like there are today. Even by the end of the period covered by this list, only the largest tractors were diesel.

Two Allis-Chalmers C's I used when helping a neighbor while growing up were new in 1930
FWIW, the AC C wasn't produced until 1940.

tractordata.com is a pretty good place to start if you want to know what models of tractors might be appropriate for flat car loadings for the year you model. ytmag.com has a lot of information as well. Be aware, however, that there were significant regional differences in what brands and models would be most common or popular.

Earl Tuson
I don't farm with anything younger than me:
'54 Farmall Super C
'55 Farmall 200
'56 Farmall 200 with a mounted bean picker
'67 JD 400


Steam era freight train

Schuyler Larrabee
 

a Reading freight running through Skillman behind an M1sa Mikado.

http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=222955&nseq=5
<http://www.railpictures.net/viewphoto.php?id=222955&nseq=5>

Thanks for looking and corrections are welcome.

Charles Freericks




Stolen from another list and forwarded.

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!


another tank car question

ed_mines
 

I'm interested in the area around Middletown, NY (east end of the
Erie) and Wilkes Barre, PA.

An 8000 gal. tank car could be emptied pretty fast if it supplied a
couple of stations. Even in a rural area gas could be used on farms.

If small town petroleum products distributors were common than I
guess team track unloading was unlikely.

In areas near the Great Lakes (like Rochester, NY) the waterways
freeze in the winter making delivery by water impossible. There was a
big oil terminal in Rochester by the airport adjacent to the Barge
Canal; there were many railroad tracks adjacent to the tank farm too.

By the time I arrived in Rochester (1970s) oil deliveries came
directly from Buffalo by truck using the New York state thruway. That
road hadn't been built in the steam era.

Here's another tank car question. In many of the places I've lived
petroleum products are shipped by water. Were tank cars ever filled
at these marine terminals?

Ed


Re: Steam era farm equip & trucks (was 1940s tank car questions)

Lee Thwaits <leethwaits@...>
 

Not that this has much to do with freight cars (although tractors were carried on flat cars) the year diesel engines appeared on the following farm tractors was: Caterpillar 1931; International Harvester 1934; Cletrac mid 30's; Allis Chalmers 1937; John Deere 1949; J I Case 1953.

Lee Thwaits


Re: 1940s tank car questions

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as
they
needed it?
In small towns in the midwest oil jobbers were often located along the
house track as were other businesses. Each jobber had a stand pipe for
unloading the cars. At Eskridge of Santa Fe's Alma branch stand pipes
for two jobbers were on the house track while the jobbers were along
the main. The oil was piped under the track to tanks. This is not to
say that some jobbers did not get their fuel on team tracks.

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?
During WWII tractors ran on a very low grade of fuel. I'd have to go
to my notes to tell you what it was called. The octane was slightly
higher than kerosene.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: Perishable LCL?

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote:

Jeff (photo attached) I have a photo of a Soo Line reefer being used
in LCL
service. This was common in early days, esp on branchlines. Local
grocers
got their meat and other prerishables via an LCL reefer.
On the Santa Fe reefers were sometimes used in LCL service on
branchlines in place of a box car. No refrigeration was involved.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


TKM/TB&OM/TS-CLM Project - FGEX/BREX/WFEX Wood Sheathed Reefers

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

I didn't have a chance to make a formal annoucement for this
project, but for those who might have missed it, Bill Welch's
handout "The Wood Sheathed Cars of the FGEX/WFEX/BREX Freight
Refrigerator Fleet: 1940-1953" is now available as a special
combined issue of The Keystone Modeler, The B&O Modeler, and The
Seaboard-Coast Line Modeler:
http://www.prrths.com/Keystone%20Modeler/Keystone_Modeler.htm
http://borhs.org/ModelerMag/index.html
http://s-clmodeler.aclsal.org/index.htm

This is a 10MB file - if you are on a slow connection, I recommend
you download the file by right clicking on the link for the issue at
the pages above and selecting "Save Target as" instead of clicking
on the link.

Credit must go where credit is due. Thank you, Bill Welch, for
allowing us to publish your work for a wide audience. Thanks also
go to the editorial staffs of each publication for their willingness
to sponsor this project as a special issue; Nick Fry of the
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Historical Society, Jay Williams of Big
Four Graphics, and Rob Schoenberg for permission to use prototype
photos for this special issue, and to Al Westerfield for providing
excerpts from the July 1950 and January 1955 ORER. Special thanks
go to Tom Madden, who took the time and effort to reconstitute this
document electronically using OCR software after the original files
were lost in a computer crash several years ago.

If you are a fan of one of the FGEX/BREX/WFEX member roads, please
spread the word and share the links to the issue with your friends.
This is one of the gaping holes in our collective knowledge, and the
impact of Bill's is widespread. Every piece of information that we
can gather for Bill is critical, because unlike PFE and SFRD, the
corporate records of the consortium were not saved, making this task
much more difficult.


Ben Hom


Re: Perishable LCL?

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

My understanding is that when it comes to meat, the peddler cars were pretty
much pre-WWII. Which just about predates the work history of anyone active
on the list. Larry's experince on the Sante Fe or UP in the 60's would be
quite different from the practices of 20's or 30's.

It is apparent that meat peddler cars were handled quite different from the
LCL cars. The one photo I have shows a standard RR reefer, not a meat
reefer, said to be in peddler service. Clark mentioned the Fairfax Car Seal
list, from a depot on the M&StL in Minn. The use of non-meat reefers used
for peddler service is confirmed from this list. Looking at the list I see
that every reefer hauling meat is a 40 or 41' car, none of the 37' meat
reefers we might think of for the late 40's. Further cars containing meat
(not mdse) were in Fairfax about once a week, 36 cars from May 29th to Mar
10. It appears June & July were heavy meat months, 7 cars each month, where
as Dec only had one car.

All in all very interesting information.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

No virus found in this outgoing message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.20.6/1280 - Release Date: 2/15/2008
9:00 AM


Re: ATSF "The Scout" lettering

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 15, 2008, at 4:25 PM, George Hollwedel wrote:

Richard,

Do you have enough information from the photos to determine slogan
car number assignments?
Yes, that information is in my rolling stock painting and lettering
guide, published by the Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling
Society. If you don't have it, it's still in print and available on
the society's web site.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: 1940s tank car questions

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Dad had a Farmall F-12 and later and F-14 both from the 1930s. Both
were started on gasoline and, when warmed up, switched to diesel fuel.
The "gas" tank was in two parts, the larger for diesel. Dad always ran
it on gasoline only.
Gene Green


Re: Atlas trucks

Charlie Vlk
 

The BRC cars were the basis for the Kato "Shorty" cupola caboose in N Scale.
I measured several preserved cars and made scale drawings for the factory.
The two series are different lengths. Both are Morrison "standard" cars that
use common details. A bunch of other railroads had such cars... they could
specify no cupola, cupola, bay window, length, interior arrangements, etc. but
the car construction was standardized.
Kato did the cupola version first, which it turns out, was very close to cars built
for the Cambria & Indiana. The cars were not as popular as I had hoped and the
Transfer and Bay Window versions have not made it to market because of it.
Nice kitbashes of the BRC cars!!!
Charlie Vlk
Railroad Model Resources


Re: ATSF "The Scout" lettering

George Hollwedel
 

Richard,

Do you have enough information from the photos to determine slogan car number assignments?

George

Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com> wrote:
On Feb 15, 2008, at 10:58 AM, Michael Bishop wrote:

Just a note, I have a copy of a photo of Bx48 #274714 taken in May of
1977 still having the "The Chief - Famous Daily Streamliner West". So
it missed any repaint starting 1947 and again in 59.
Yes, for some reason many Bx-48s weren't repainted and restenciled; I
have numerous photos from the late Lee Berglund showing these cars with
original paint and lettering in the late '60s and early '70s.

Richard Hendrickson







Yahoo! Groups Links






Prototype N Scale Models (TM)
by George Hollwedel
310 Loma Verde St
Buda, TX 78610-9785
512-796-6883

---------------------------------
Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.


Re: 1940s tank car questions

Perry Scheuerman <perry.scheuerman@...>
 

Ed,
Our 30's vintage John Deere Model D was made to start on gasoline and run on "power fuel" which was more like kerosene than gasoline. Tractor fuel was a special blend made by the refineries. We still made the stuff in the 60's, dyed blue for Nebraska and green for Kansas. I suspect most of the older tractors ran on that stuff. By the 50's new tractors were using gasoline and diesel.
Perry Scheuerman

Mark Plank <tandocrr@mail.com> wrote:
Ed,

To answer one question:
Did farm equipment run on gasoline?
Yes. Not sure when diesel engines became popular in tractors (I'm sure someone tried it shortly after van/von Diesel built his first engine [in the 1880s? I'm away from research information now]), but our first diesel was a Ford 4000 in 1964. Dad had a 1948 Farmall C and a 1952 860 Ford that ran on gas, an earlier tractor was a Ford 9N that used gas. Two Allis-Chalmers C's I used when helping a neighbor while growing up were new in 1930 and used gas - he is still farming with them! In checking out the local parades, most of the "antique" tractors seem to be gas. Not a scientific answer, but in my limited experience, gas prevailed until the past 20 or so years. Our combines also ran on gas both at home and when I was on wheat harvest in 1981.

Mark Plank

--
Want an e-mail address like mine?
Get a free e-mail account today at www.mail.com!






---------------------------------
Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.


Re: Q about color of EJ&E 1940 twin hopper

Ed Hawkins
 

On Feb 15, 2008, at 4:09 PM, Scott Pitzer wrote:

http://www.columbusrailroads.com/Ralston%201940%20cars.htm

This COR-TEN steel offset hopper built in 1940 would have been black
with white lettering in service, right? I shouldn't pontificate to the
site owner that it's "only a temporary builder photo paint scheme"
without checking with real experts.

Scott Pitzer
Scott,
ACF built identical cars for EJ&E in 1940 numbered 40200-40799. All
cars built at the same time were likely painted the same regardless of
the builder. The ACF bill of materials specifies the cars were coated
with Scully Black Graphite (outside of sides, ends, and bottom).
Stencils were white. The BOM had a paint sample, which was a textured
finish much like very fine emery paper. The color was not pure black,
but rather a very dark gray.

Incidentally, the web site link states these cars were built to the
1935 AAR Alternate Standard design. Not true. These cars were 34'-9"
inside length (not 33' as required by the AAR Standard designs), and
the sides were of a different arrangement than used on AAR Alternate
Standard hopper cars.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: 1940s tank car questions

Andy Laurent <andy.laurent@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Did any customers unload gasoline from a team track or a siding as
they
needed it?

Did farm equipment run on gasoline?

Was tank car utilization greater during the winter when petroleum
couldn't be delivered by water?

Ed
Ed, what locale are you modeling?

In the Midwest, retail fuel dealers (typically called "jobbers")
existed in almost every small town with railroad service. The
shortline I model was only 34 miles long, but had 16 bulk oil dealers
in 1950. They were the most common rail customers for bulk fuels.

One of those dealers was located off-line, but did not use a team
track/truck arrangement for their deliveries. They had 3 vertical
storage tanks along a siding, and would unload the tankcar there
(using standard rack/pumps/piping system) and run their truck to/from
those storage tanks. That would be a great "small footprint" industry
to model...a few tanks (gasoline, fuel oil, maybe diesel), an
unloading stand/rack, and a pump house.

This traffic all but dried up on the A&W between 1952 and 1956 as oil
company terminals switched to trucks for short-haul distribution of
petroleum products. Standard Oil was the exception, as they continued
to send bulk fuel on the 50-mile rail routing.

As for winter tank car utilization...I can only guess. Fuel oil usage
would have been higher in the winter (heating), but gasoline demand
was higher in summer (vacations)...so it may have evened out.

Andy Laurent
modeling the Ahnapee & Western Railway in the early 1950s


Re: Perishable LCL?

John Hile <john66h@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Larry Jackman <Ljack70117@...> wrote:

LCL was a RR's service not a shipper's service. So unless meat was
delivered to the RR's freight house and the RR loaded it into a car
it would not be LCL. There was a service where a shipper shipped a
carload and had it stop and unload part of it. In This service the
shipper paid the freight to the final destination and then paid a
flat fee to stop the car to unload part of it. You had a right to
make two stops.

More from the 1950 Freight Traffic Red Book...

"As peddler-car service is really the granting of a less-than-carload
service on carload freight, it can be accorded only when definitely
provided for in the publications of the carriers. The items which
will be granted such service are shown in the tariffs of the
individual railroads, with the rules and regulations under which the
service will be accorded. The carriers also publish the points at
which peddler-car service will be allowed, the minimum weight, and the
mixtures which will be permitted in the car. The provisions vary
considerably."

Most of the ICC cases referenced regarding rates and peddler-car
practices are from the 'teens, some from the 20's and 30's...to put
things in perspective, relative to railroad operation of the time.

Section 6 of the Perishable Protective Tariff 13 deals with special
rules and charges on perishable freight in less than carloads. I have
scanned this section of the 1944 Tariff, and will post to the file
section for those interested.

It discusses "Scheduled Refrigerator Car Service" and "Box Car
Service" as options a carrier could offer. It also touches on "Meat
Peddler Cars"

John Hile
Blacksburg, VA


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /P P Tariff 13 Section 6.pdf
Uploaded by : john66h <john66h@aol.com>
Description : P P Tariff 13, Section 6

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/P%20P%20Tariff%2013%20Section%206.pdf

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.htmlfiles

Regards,

john66h <john66h@aol.com>

114341 - 114360 of 184354