Date   

Re: Dairy Shippers Despatch cars?

water.kresse@...
 

Would they ship fresh eggs in reefers or house cars or ventilated boxes?

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
On Feb 20, 2008, at 12:05 PM, RUTLANDRS@... wrote:

Richard,
Would one of the Rutland Car Shops Rutland reefers be applicable. They
are available from Bethlehem Car Works.
Actually, the DSDX billboard reefer I mentioned in my post appears to
have been a former MDT car of the design modeled by Rutland Car Shops.
However, the early '50s DSDX cars were former MDT cars built (or
rebuilt) in the 1920s and '30s.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: tools for building freight cars sorta of close to topic

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Dermody <ddermody@...> wrote:

Jon,

I don't believe such a beast exists. To my knowledge, the Philips
spec defines the head only, while the thread can be US or metric, so
what you really need is the Phillips size that fits the head on the
screws you're using. McMaster-Carr lists both sets and individual
drivers down to #000 size.

Dick
Here's a conversion table, from Wikipedia:

American Metric
#000 1.4mm
#00 2.0mm
#0 2.5mm
#1 3.2mm

Hope the formatting holds up.

Dennis


Re: tools for building freight cars sorta of close to topic

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Thanks to all.
I ordered some 2.0mm, 1.4mm, and 1.2mm.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Tank Car Unloading-LPG

MDelvec952
 

What era?

Today nitrogen is pumped into LPG cars to force the contents out.? Once empty, the cars are then depressured for transport.
?
Mike Del Vecchio

-----Original Message-----
From: boyds1949 <E27ca@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, 21 Feb 2008 11:47 am
Subject: [STMFC] Tank Car Unloading-LPG






I was looking at a recent model railroad publication on building a
propane dealership and it said that the liquid propane was unloaded by
pumping air in the tank car to force the liquid propane out. Is that
correct? I would think that forcing air in a propane tank car would be
creating the perfect mix for a violent explosion. It would make sense
to pump propane gas into the tank. Does anyone know what they really
did?

John King





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Re: tools for building freight cars sorta of close to topic

Carl J. Marsico <Carlmarsico@...>
 

I'll take it a step further and say that McMaster-Carr sells pretty much every tool you could think of.

Carl J. Marsico

Jack Burgess <jack@...> wrote:
I'm not sure about metric, but McMaster-Carr has phillips screw drivers down
to 000

http://www.mcmaster.com/

on catalog page 2779

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com

I keep trying to find metric phillips screwdrivers in the 1mm and 2mm
range. Typical screws used in our freight cars. Have done all the
searching and only place I ever got one was a order to NZ and it
came from
Germany.
Help!


Re: tools for building freight cars sorta of close to topic

Richard Dermody <ddermody@...>
 

Jon,

I don't believe such a beast exists. To my knowledge, the Philips spec defines the head only, while the thread can be US or metric, so what you really need is the Phillips size that fits the head on the screws you're using. McMaster-Carr lists both sets and individual drivers down to #000 size.

Dick

On Feb 21, 2008, at 12:46 PM, Jon Miller wrote:

I keep trying to find metric phillips screwdrivers in the 1mm and 2mm
range. Typical screws used in our freight cars. Have done all the
searching and only place I ever got one was a order to NZ and it came from
Germany.
Help!

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS





Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: More with Ventilated cars

Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Back before we had styrofoam peanuts, Excelsior was a commonly-used
packing material for glassware and other fragile items.
A google search shows excelsior is still readily available. The bulk
form seems to be bales, but no matter how much it's compressed, it's
still a relatively low density cargo. I have no idea whether, in the
steam era, excelsior bales would have any wrapping other than for
containment. Seems to me any house car capable of keeping the bales
clean and dry would work.

Tom Madden


Re: Ventilated box car uses - preferably C&O

water.kresse@...
 

Folks,

I really appreciate the feedback so far but . . . . . and this may seem a little picky but . . . I was looking for information on the particulars of their original primary usage (as to why did they buy them?) and not their usage as backup "house" box cars (more than fruit or veggy movement . . . what fruits or veggies, at what times of the year, say back in the 1920s and 1930s, other commodities that needed ventilation, etc.).

Also, did ventilator box cars have a special tariff for special handling?

Thanks again,

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: anthony wagner <anycw1@...>
From Chicago too, When I was a yard clerk for the C&NW in the early 1970s at 40th St yard (now abandonned) Hall Printing used to ship Sears catalogs and Playboy magazines, among others, to the west coast in empty PFE reefers. As you can imagine no one in the yard office ever had to buy Playboy, compliments of Hall. Tony Wagner

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote: Ben Hom wrote (replying to Frank Valoczy):
"Not a ventilated car, but I was also very surprised to notice MDT
5659 with "merchandise," PFE 33196 with "magazines," and WFEX 66159
with "compound" - whatever that might be."

Again, not unusual at all.
Quite true. PFE had a substantial westbound loading pattern of
magazines, many from Philadelphia (think _Saturday Evening Post_). This
was at least as early as the 1920s and persisted into the 1960s.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tank Car Unloading-LPG

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

I just spoke by telephone with a gentleman who worked with my late
father at a propane terminal. (I just happened to be on the phone with
him for another reason when the message below popped up.)

Propane tank cars (currently, at least) are unloaded by pumping propane
vapors from an empty tank (fixed location tank, not tank car) into the
top of the tank car. The pressure forces the liquid propane up a
siphon, out the top of the car and into a pipe that connects to the
aforementioned tank where the vacuum created by pumping vapor into the
tank car sucks the liquid propane into the tank.

I dare not say, "This is the way it was always done" even though I
believe that to be the case.

By the way, Dad wrecked three propane tank cars about 10 years ago. He
was letting them roll down-grade to spot one for unloading. He was
relying on one hand brake to stop all three. It didn't. Dad's version
of the story included a hand brake that failed to work. This was
regular practice at this terminal - letting the cars roll down hill to
be spotted for unloading - except that it was supposed to be done one
car at a time, not three at a time with only one person present.

Gene Green
Out in the west Texas town of El Paso

--- In STMFC@..., "boyds1949" <E27ca@...> wrote:

I was looking at a recent model railroad publication on building a
propane dealership and it said that the liquid propane was unloaded
by
pumping air in the tank car to force the liquid propane out. Is that
correct? I would think that forcing air in a propane tank car would
be
creating the perfect mix for a violent explosion. It would make
sense
to pump propane gas into the tank. Does anyone know what they really
did?

John King


Re: tools for building freight cars sorta of close to topic

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

I'm not sure about metric, but McMaster-Carr has phillips screw drivers down
to 000

http://www.mcmaster.com/

on catalog page 2779

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com

I keep trying to find metric phillips screwdrivers in the 1mm and 2mm
range. Typical screws used in our freight cars. Have done all the
searching and only place I ever got one was a order to NZ and it
came from
Germany.
Help!


Re: tools for building freight cars sorta of close to topic

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

I keep trying to find metric phillips screwdrivers in the 1mm and 2mm range. Typical screws used in our freight cars. Have done all the searching and only place I ever got one was a order to NZ and it came from Germany.
Help!

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Ventilated box car uses - preferrably C&O

anthony wagner
 

From Chicago too, When I was a yard clerk for the C&NW in the early 1970s at 40th St yard (now abandonned) Hall Printing used to ship Sears catalogs and Playboy magazines, among others, to the west coast in empty PFE reefers. As you can imagine no one in the yard office ever had to buy Playboy, compliments of Hall. Tony Wagner

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote: Ben Hom wrote (replying to Frank Valoczy):
"Not a ventilated car, but I was also very surprised to notice MDT
5659 with "merchandise," PFE 33196 with "magazines," and WFEX 66159
with "compound" - whatever that might be."

Again, not unusual at all.
Quite true. PFE had a substantial westbound loading pattern of
magazines, many from Philadelphia (think _Saturday Evening Post_). This
was at least as early as the 1920s and persisted into the 1960s.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tank Car Unloading-LPG

Perry Scheuerman <perry.scheuerman@...>
 

The pump pulls vapor from the top of the customer tank and pressures it back into the tank car.
Perry Scheuerman

boyds1949 <E27ca@...> wrote:
I was looking at a recent model railroad publication on building a
propane dealership and it said that the liquid propane was unloaded by
pumping air in the tank car to force the liquid propane out. Is that
correct? I would think that forcing air in a propane tank car would be
creating the perfect mix for a violent explosion. It would make sense
to pump propane gas into the tank. Does anyone know what they really
did?

John King






---------------------------------
Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.


Tank Car Unloading-LPG

boyds1949 <E27ca@...>
 

I was looking at a recent model railroad publication on building a
propane dealership and it said that the liquid propane was unloaded by
pumping air in the tank car to force the liquid propane out. Is that
correct? I would think that forcing air in a propane tank car would be
creating the perfect mix for a violent explosion. It would make sense
to pump propane gas into the tank. Does anyone know what they really
did?

John King


Re: Tank Car Unloading was: oil for roads

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote:

Steve thanks for catching my typo on the car number. And yes the
analysis is
fun. Your comments are appreciated, esp to the fact the car has heater
coils. The truck may be a hot oil or hot tar truck, with propane
tanks for
heating. The tall verticle tank on the bumper looks to be the
propane tank.
And the small trailer looks to have its own engine for driving the pump
along with a fuel tank or possible water tank for producing steam?
It could
also have a heating element. The car does not appear to be located
where it
could be connected to a supply of steam for heating. Could that
trailer be a
source of heat/steam for heating the car?

Doug Harding
One thing's for certain, the guy is safety conscious. Note the old
soda-acid fire extinguisher standing on the ground just in front of
the air reservoir on the car :-)

If I recall, a lot of these road oil tank trucks were kerosene fired
years ago, same as roofer's tar kettles were. The vertical tank on the
truck could well be a kerosene tank.

I think the trailer is a portable steam generator. The circular object
on the near end is too large to be a pump for heavy oil; I think it's
a large squirrel cage blower that's ducted into the round chamber in
the center of the tank. A propane burner will work in ambient air
pressure, because the fuel itself is pressurized, but to get any heat
out of an oil burner (fuel oil or kerosene) you need a forced draft. I
would assume there is also a small oil pump on this rig to feed the
fuel oil through the burner jet. I doubt that it's high pressure
steam; it more likely circulates hot water, or steam at 3 – 5 psi like
a home heating boiler.

Dennis


Copetown, Ont Show

Earl Tuson
 

Hello,

The Copetown, Ontario, Train Show is this Sunday (http://www.caorm.org/PDF/Copetown_2008_flyer.pdf.) To meet list guidelines, I can tell you there will be many excellent steam era freight cars displayed there (and I believe freight car photos sold as well.)

I know this is rather short notice for most folks, but I may be driving from New Hampshire to go to Show. Would anyone in the New England area be interested in car pooling to save on gas money and share the burden of drving.��I drive at night, and have no intentions on getting accomodations anywhere.��Please respond off list.

Earl Tuson


Re: Tank Car Unloading was: oil for roads

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 


What's less clear to me is how the oil is being unloaded. >
Isn't it fun to try and analyze old photos?

Regards,
Steve Hile
Steve, My friend who grew up in Britt IA uncle ran an oil dealership.
As I remember his story his uncle would put a pipe into the dome. That
pipe was connected with hose to the pump. I have no idea how he primed
the system. He also remember the Milwaukee needing to move other cars
on the track his uncle was unloading a tank car on. He'd have to remove
his pipe from the dome and wait till the Milw was done switching to
finish unloading the car.
Clark Propst


NYC Auto Box

Guy Wilber
 

Ben Hom wrote:

Lot 633-B, steel automobile boxcars rebuilt in 1935 from Lot 357-B DS
automobile boxcars...
NYC 56000 is equipped with auto racks, but they aren't Evans Auto~Loaders.
The designation "C" on the right door underneath the white stripe indicates
that the car is equipped with NYC's own rack system utilizing Evans tie downs
for the autos (or trucks) that were stowed on the car floor. The "C" stood
for Combination while other NYC cars equipped with complete NYC designed racks
and tie downs were designated (as such) with an "N" in the same position.

The NYC "C" equipped cars may have been equipped with floor tubes, I have
not seen any photo (or diagram) confirmation of such. Either application of
racks may also have had stencils; 36, 36+, 37 or 38 applied below the letter
designation indicating alterations of the rack to accommodate automobile and/or
truck models from those specific model years. A "+" indicated the car
racking system was modified to accommodate larger model vehicles such as the
Hudson.

All of the above marking were made obsolete in March of 1939 with the
adoption of the Auto Car Lettering "Standards" as shown within Bulletin 28 included
within the ORER from July, 1945 forward.

Guy Wilber
West Bend, WI









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Re: tools for building freight cars sorta of close to topic

Charles Hladik
 

Jon,
IIRC Sears has them in the Crafstman line, never have to buy another
again.


Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division
NMRA L5756



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Re: More with Ventilated cars

Scott Pitzer
 

The small "swamp cooler" my grandmother had in the 1960s, apparently
had excelsior in it to hold water up in front of the fan (today they
have synthetic pads.)
Scott Pitzer

126801 - 126820 of 196975