Date   

Re: Tank Car Unloading was: oil for roads

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
Clark, do you know any reason he didn't just use the bottom
outlet?

My guess is that those bottom valves weren't easy open to prevent
thieves and vandals from opening them.

The small size of the outlet would slow down emptying the tank by
gravity should it be opened. Thicker liquids would be even slower to
drain. Even with a pump it would take much longer to empty the car
compared to pumping from the dome.

Ed


Re: Roco/AHM Freight Cars, was Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Carl J. Marsico <Carlmarsico@...>
 

There are some Roco/AHM freight cars out there that are the basis for some pretty nice models:

http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/image/88111993

It's my understanding that AHM imported these cars from Roco with an a array of "Minitanks" loads for a short period of time, well before I was born. Did Roco continue making these flats after AHM discontinued them/went out of business?

Carl J. Marsico

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...> wrote:
Thanks Garth, but I'm not the one looking at modeling these cars - I just
posted out of curiousity.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Garth G. Groff
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2008 9:39 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Kurt,

I think you are going to discover that the tank is too large, and maybe
the expansion domes are as well. IIRC, AHM's original tank car was a
knock-off of the oversized Athearn 3-dome tank car. Later the frame and
bottom sheet tooling were reused to make more oversized "models" of
certain other tank cars, including the 6-dome wine cars. Back in those
days, almost nobody noticed or cared. The AHM car should dimension out
to around 11,000 U.S. gallons, which is probably way too large for the
real wine cars (likely around 8,000 U.S. gallons). If you check Jim
Eager's D&RGW book (you do have this book don't you?), you will find a
photo of the water car you mentioned earlier. I don't have my copy at
had, but Jim usually gives the facts like the capacity in his text. If
you don't have this book, let me know and I will check for you next
week. In short, your car is probably going to be a stand-in, and if you
don't mind, that's fine.

By the way, I seem to recall that this tank fit the Athearn frame and
bottom sheet. Even though it will still be a "stand-in", the Athearn
parts are much better than the AHM, and will have the advantage of
coupler draft gear mounted on the frame instead of "taglo" trucks.

Kind regards,

Garth G. Groff

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
Now I realize these are "train set" cars, but what I've read says that the
biggest problem with them is the fact that they are uninsulated. The AHM
car I got with my set back in '72 or so *is* insulated, so I wonder if
that
makes them closer to something?

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson

Eddie Stavleu wrote:

I have the HO Roco cars that will do me for these. D&RGW had one as a
water car for MOW
If these are only stand-in or "fun" cars, the Roco ones are fine,
but be aware they are not even close to a prototype.


Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

I was a metal kit for one (Thomas?) in a couple of paint schemes. The kit had a smaller tank (6K?) but also many things wrong with it. They show up on ebay occasionally and usually get a good price (40-50 range).

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Renting of freight cars to the Yakima Valley Transportation Co.

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

I did a quick analysis on Richard Wilkens' spreadsheet and uploaded an
updated copy to the group Files section. The PRR cars are broken out
on the second sheet, with links to Rob Schoenberg's online equipment
diagrams to illustrate these cars. I also did some minor formatting to
make the spreadsheets print out more neatly.

Some overall notes:
- To reflect the organization of the Pennsy system at the time, I split
out the cars between PRR and Lines West. (The ORERs of the period had
separate listings for both.)
- Unless otherwise noted, PRR "Lines East" cars belonged to PRR.
The "Lines East" listings showed which predecessor road owned the cars;
Lines West did not make that distinction. Ownership initials were
stenciled on cars painted in NK3 at the lower left corner of the car
side below the car class and built date. This practice continued into
the 1960s; ownership initials can be found to the right of the car
class for cars painted in CK and later paint schemes.)
- As expected, Class XL boxcars made up the largest single group of
cars; however, there were a few surprises, including Class XG and XH
truss rod boxcars that survived WWI, a Class X25 express boxcar, and a
new Class X26 USRA single sheathed boxcar.


Ben Hom


Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Thanks Garth, but I'm not the one looking at modeling these cars - I just posted out of curiousity.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Garth G. Groff
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2008 9:39 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars


Kurt,

I think you are going to discover that the tank is too large, and maybe
the expansion domes are as well. IIRC, AHM's original tank car was a
knock-off of the oversized Athearn 3-dome tank car. Later the frame and
bottom sheet tooling were reused to make more oversized "models" of
certain other tank cars, including the 6-dome wine cars. Back in those
days, almost nobody noticed or cared. The AHM car should dimension out
to around 11,000 U.S. gallons, which is probably way too large for the
real wine cars (likely around 8,000 U.S. gallons). If you check Jim
Eager's D&RGW book (you do have this book don't you?), you will find a
photo of the water car you mentioned earlier. I don't have my copy at
had, but Jim usually gives the facts like the capacity in his text. If
you don't have this book, let me know and I will check for you next
week. In short, your car is probably going to be a stand-in, and if you
don't mind, that's fine.

By the way, I seem to recall that this tank fit the Athearn frame and
bottom sheet. Even though it will still be a "stand-in", the Athearn
parts are much better than the AHM, and will have the advantage of
coupler draft gear mounted on the frame instead of "taglo" trucks.

Kind regards,

Garth G. Groff

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
Now I realize these are "train set" cars, but what I've read says that the
biggest problem with them is the fact that they are uninsulated. The AHM
car I got with my set back in '72 or so *is* insulated, so I wonder if that
makes them closer to something?

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson

Eddie Stavleu wrote:

I have the HO Roco cars that will do me for these. D&RGW had one as a
water car for MOW
If these are only stand-in or "fun" cars, the Roco ones are fine,
but be aware they are not even close to a prototype.


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /YVT Car Rentals 1917 to 1920 (Hom edit) 2-22-2008.xls
Uploaded by : benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
Description : PRR Car Analysis plus minor reformatting for printing

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/YVT%20Car%20Rentals%201917%20to%201920%20%28Hom%20edit%29%202-22-2008.xls

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.htmlfiles

Regards,

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>


Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Kurt,

I think you are going to discover that the tank is too large, and maybe the expansion domes are as well. IIRC, AHM's original tank car was a knock-off of the oversized Athearn 3-dome tank car. Later the frame and bottom sheet tooling were reused to make more oversized "models" of certain other tank cars, including the 6-dome wine cars. Back in those days, almost nobody noticed or cared. The AHM car should dimension out to around 11,000 U.S. gallons, which is probably way too large for the real wine cars (likely around 8,000 U.S. gallons). If you check Jim Eager's D&RGW book (you do have this book don't you?), you will find a photo of the water car you mentioned earlier. I don't have my copy at had, but Jim usually gives the facts like the capacity in his text. If you don't have this book, let me know and I will check for you next week. In short, your car is probably going to be a stand-in, and if you don't mind, that's fine.

By the way, I seem to recall that this tank fit the Athearn frame and bottom sheet. Even though it will still be a "stand-in", the Athearn parts are much better than the AHM, and will have the advantage of coupler draft gear mounted on the frame instead of "taglo" trucks.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Kurt Laughlin wrote:

Now I realize these are "train set" cars, but what I've read says that the biggest problem with them is the fact that they are uninsulated. The AHM car I got with my set back in '72 or so *is* insulated, so I wonder if that makes them closer to something?

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson

Eddie Stavleu wrote:

I have the HO Roco cars that will do me for these. D&RGW had one as a
water car for MOW
If these are only stand-in or "fun" cars, the Roco ones are fine,
but be aware they are not even close to a prototype.


Re: SFRD Fan-Equipped Rr-30 RH Side Lettering

John Hile <john66h@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

John, by early 1953 the mechanical fans originally fitted to SFRD
37365-37389 had been replaced with electric fans, and other cars in the
Rr-30 class had also received electric fans. I have a photo of SFRD
37315 with electric fans installed (and black-painted side hardware)
which I could scan for you if it would be useful.
Interesting. I had been working from info in the Jan. 1953 ORER that
listed 37365-37389 as the only fan equipped Rr-30's. Do you have any
info letting me know the time period over which the conversion to
electric fans took place? The point being, I would like to include
both a mechanical fan Rr-30 and a yellow-orange hardware Rr-30 on my
roster if it is appropriate for my modeling window of mid '52 to mid '53.

The SFMO Reefer Book (p. 215) has a photo of 37374 with what appear to
be the original mechanical fans, and a shop date of 4/50. I'm
wondering if a car such as this could have kept its mech. fans into
the second half of '52.

Sounds, however, like a car being shopped in early '53 and receiving
the yellow-orange hardware scheme would also receive the electric fans
at that time...if it had not received them already?

I appreciate the offer for the scan of 37315, but I may already have
the published version, if it is the Chet McCoid/Bob's RH-side shot in
1957. Since 37315 has a blk hardware scheme and electric fans, is it
appropriate to assume electric fan installations to previous non-fan
cars occurred as early as '47? Or, merely that the conversions could
occur without repainting the car?

Thanks in Advance,

John Hile
Blacksburg, VA


Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Now I realize these are "train set" cars, but what I've read says that the biggest problem with them is the fact that they are uninsulated. The AHM car I got with my set back in '72 or so *is* insulated, so I wonder if that makes them closer to something?

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson

Eddie Stavleu wrote:
I have the HO Roco cars that will do me for these. D&RGW had one as a
water car for MOW
If these are only stand-in or "fun" cars, the Roco ones are fine,
but be aware they are not even close to a prototype.


Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Eddie Stavleu <eddiestavleu@...>
 

Tony,

Beggars can't be choosers, I know that they are not 100% but then.
No one will know here in Australia and if they do then they need to give me
where they got the info from.

Question, Do you have any photos in color of the said cars ?
Preferably with the wine names on them.

Thanks
Eddie Stavleu.




If these are only stand-in or "fun" cars, the Roco ones are fine,
but be aware they are not even close to a prototype.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

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Re: Tank Car Unloading was: oil for roads

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Clark Propst wrote:
Steve, My friend who grew up in Britt IA uncle ran an oil dealership. As I remember his story his uncle would put a pipe into the dome. That pipe was connected with hose to the pump.
Clark, do you know any reason he didn't just use the bottom outlet?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tank Car Unloading-LPG

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

This gets me wondering--

Just when did propane come into common use on farms and homes?

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., MDelvec952@... wrote:


What era?

Today nitrogen is pumped into LPG cars to force the contents out.?
Once empty, the cars are then depressured for transport.
?
Mike Del Vecchio


-----Original Message-----
From: boyds1949 <E27ca@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, 21 Feb 2008 11:47 am
Subject: [STMFC] Tank Car Unloading-LPG






I was looking at a recent model railroad publication on building a
propane dealership and it said that the liquid propane was unloaded
by
pumping air in the tank car to force the liquid propane out. Is
that
correct? I would think that forcing air in a propane tank car would
be
creating the perfect mix for a violent explosion. It would make
sense
to pump propane gas into the tank. Does anyone know what they
really
did?

John King





______________________________________________________________________
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More new features than ever. Check out the new AOL Mail ! -
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Re: 6 Dome wine tank cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Eddie Stavleu wrote:
I have the HO Roco cars that will do me for these. D&RGW had one as a water car for MOW
If these are only stand-in or "fun" cars, the Roco ones are fine, but be aware they are not even close to a prototype.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Renting of freight cars to the Yakima Valley Transportation Co.

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

My list differs somewhat from Mr. Brown's but here is what I found
and where I found it and what I couldn't find.

A&V = Alabama & Vicksburg Ry. Co.
DC = Delray Connecting RR Co. (Detroit, Mich.)
FS&W = Fort Smith & Western Ry. (Fort Smith, Ark.)
H&TC = Houston & Texas Central RR (see Southern Pacific Lines in
Texas and Louisiana.)
NODM = Nor-Oeste de Mexico (see Mexico North-Western Ry.)
About CI&W: I found Cincinnati, Indianapolis & Western RR but the
reporting marks listed are "CIWN."
About NONE: I found New Orlean & Northeastern listed as "NO&NE"
under the Southern Ry System entry.
SOURCE: March 1923 ORER

C&IW = CHICAGO & ILLINOIS WESTERN RAILROAD
DS = DURHAM & SOUTHERN RAILWAY CO.
SOURCE: http://www.pwrr.org/rrm/rrmc.html

CH&D = ?
DH&C = ?
FRL = ?

Reporting marks have, on occasion, been reused. I have seen examples
of this in private owner reporting marks. It may be that WHEN a
reporting mark was used would be germaine to WHAT it represented at
that time.

Gene Green
Out in the west Texas town of El Paso

Old reporting marks -- gotta love 'em!

A&V: Alabama & Vicksburg (later part of the Illinois Central)
CH&D: Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton (later part of the B&O)
CI&W: Cincinnati, Indianapolis, & Western (spun off from the CH&D,
but later also bought by the B&O)
DC, DH&C: dunno
DS: perhaps Detroit Southern (later part of the DT&I); unsure since
the list sometimes omits ampersands (Durham & Southern?)
FS&W: Fort Smith & Western (abandoned 1939)
H&TC: Houston & Texas Central (later part of the Texas & New
Orleans)
NOT&M, NO&NE: already identified by others

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Renting of freight cars to the Yakima Valley Transportation Co.

al_brown03
 

--- In STMFC@..., "railsnw1" <railsnw@...> wrote:

Warning: this might be long for some and I hope the formatting
stays
together.

Beginning in mid 2007 I started researching the corporate files of
the Yakima Valley Transportation Company which are held by the
Yakima Valley Museum in Yakima, Washington. These files cover
almost all aspects of the YVT from 1907 to the early 1980's. One of
the main components of this collection are the letter files, which
as the name implies, contain copies of letters arranged by
different file numbers. One of these Letter File's is 15-10, Car
Rentals. Before delving into this file a little history of the YVT
is probably in order for those not aware of it.

Located in the fertile Yakima Valley of Washington State, the
Yakima Valley Transportation Co. was an electric railroad that
operated from 1907 until 1985. Initially built as a streetcar and
interurban railroad it was taken over by the Union Pacific in 1909
with a view towards tapping the freight from the rich orchards and
farmlands. By 1912 the YVT had been built westward to areas such as
Wiley City and Ahtanum and was also building northward from Yakima
to Selah. Besides the agricultural traffic their was also a large
amount of freight traffic to be had from the Cascade Lumber Co. so
a line was built up 8th Street off Yakima Avenue to the mill.

At this time the freight cars on the YVT consisted of boxcar #400
which had been purchased used from a dealer and previously had been
on the Oregon Railroad & Navigation Co. and fourteen wooden
flatcars, #1000 & #1013. The first two cars appear to have been
purchased in 1909 from the Spokane & Inland Railway and the rest of
the cars were built new for the YVT by Seattle Car & Foundry in
1910.

The connecting railroad to the YVT was Union Pacific's Oregon-
Washington Railroad and Navigation Company. Connection to the OWR&N
was made at a transfer track near South 2nd Ave. & Pine Street at
the South end of Yakima. Also in Yakima was the Northern Pacific
Railway but it did not connect directly with the YVT and shipments
were handled through the OWR&N. By the Spring of 1912 online
merchandise traffic had grown so great that the YVT's equipment
could not handle it all and in June 1912 an agreement was reached
where the OWR&N would rent cars at the rate of 40 cents per day. In
September 1913 the YVT was in need of more box cars mostly to
handle box shook from the Cascade sawmill to the various fruit
packing warehouses. Box Shook is the term for the broken down
crates that would be assembled at the packing houses in to fruit
crates.

By 1916 things were getting complicated on the handling of cars
between the YVT & OWR&N so a new agreement was worked out as
follows:

1.Cars delivered to or received from the YVT Co., on which the
OWR&N receive a line haul to be handled on a demurrage basis.

2.Cars loaded on the YVT Co's tracks and move to industries on the
OWR&N Co's tracks, at North Yakima, or cars loaded on industry
tracks on the OWR&N Company at North Yakima and move to line points
on the YVT Co's tracks to be considered as in local service and
paid for on rental basis of 45 cents per car per day. "Except PFE
Refrigerators, which will be settled for on a demurrage basis."

3.Cars delivered to the YVT Company by the OWR&N for placement on
various sidings for prospective loading, to be charged for on
demurrage basis, 72 hours from time cars are actually ordered by
shippers, or if no order given, when loading actually commences.

4.Cars delivered the YVT Company for Prospective business and
subsequently used locally on the YVT Company's Line, to be on a
rental basis from day preceding movement, until returned to
industry, or transfer track,

5.The number of days used in local service under Item 2, to be
arrived at by deducting date of receipt from date of delivery.

A note should be made that this agreement covered non refrigerator
cars, refrigerator cars were mostly provided by the Pacific Fruit
Express.

So back to our Letter File 15-10. Part of this file contains memo's
of the cars rented by month for the years 1917 to 1920. These give
the reporting marks, when the car was dropped off to the YVT and
when it was returned to the OWR&N. I have entered a list of these
cars in an excel spread sheet and it can be found in the file
section titled "YVT Car rentals 1917 to 1920".

In 1917 and early 1918 the cars that were rented either had UP
reporting marks or were from subsidiaries such as OWR&N or Oregon
Short Line. Beginning in 1918 the bulk of the cars rented were from
non UP railroads. While some were from western railroads quite a
few were from such far flung eastern lines like the Rutland.

So here is where I could use your help. Some of these reporting
marks are from railroads I'm not aware of such as A&V, CH&D, CI&W,
DC, DH&C, DS, FRL, FS&W, H&TC, NODM, NONE, and so on. I have
faithfully transcribed this data so I know some might be typos from
the original lists. So if you have a chance to visit the list and
check things out it is appreciated.

Thanks,

Richard Wilkens
Old reporting marks -- gotta love 'em!

A&V: Alabama & Vicksburg (later part of the Illinois Central)
CH&D: Cincinnati, Hamilton, & Dayton (later part of the B&O)
CI&W: Cincinnati, Indianapolis, & Western (spun off from the CH&D,
but later also bought by the B&O)
DC, DH&C: dunno
DS: perhaps Detroit Southern (later part of the DT&I); unsure since
the list sometimes omits ampersands (Durham & Southern?)
FS&W: Fort Smith & Western (abandoned 1939)
H&TC: Houston & Texas Central (later part of the Texas & New Orleans)
NOT&M, NO&NE: already identified by others

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Dairy Shippers Despatch cars?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 21, 2008, at 5:14 PM, Earl Tuson wrote:

Early in its history, Dairy Shippers actually shipped dairy
products...
> By the post-WW-II period, however, DSDX traffic was mostly, if not
entirely, beer...

Three DSDX cars showed up in the 1929-30 B&M Wheel report I am
working with. Two, 1427 & 1455, were carrying unspecified 'beverages'
destined for Grand Island, NE, and Grand Forks, ND, respectively,
while a third, 7030, was being moved empty to White River Jct, VT.
That seems like a long way to move beer, but it surely isn't milk!
Well, it couldn't have been beer in 1929-'30, as prohibition was still
in effect. Congress made 3.2% beer legal in April of 1933 but it
wasn't until December of that year that enough states had ratified the
repeal of the Volstead Act to make "real" beer legal. Some of the
breweries that survived during prohibition made and shipped malt tonic
and such but there was plenty of that available from Milwaukee, St.
Louis, etc. so why ship it to Grand Island (or Grand Forks or Grand
Rapids or Grand anywhere) from New England? It would be really
interesting to know what those "beverages" were!

Richard Hendrickson


Re: SFRD Fan-Equipped Rr-30 RH Side Lettering

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 21, 2008, at 3:41 PM, John Hile wrote:

I am looking for information that will help me determine how the Santa
Fe would have located the dimensional and weight data on the RH
(non-fan) side of the fan-equipped (37365-37389) Rr-30's. If it
matters, I plan to paint my model as an early '53 repaint with
yellow-orange hardware and Ship & Travel slogan.

I realize the fan-equipped Rr-30's were somewhat unusual in that both
fan drives were on the LH side of the car (like the fan-equipped USRA
rebuild Rr-27's) thus displacing both the dimensional and weight data
on that side. So, my question is, was there any pattern to how the
dimensional and weight data were applied to the other (RH) side of the
cars? Were they typically in their "normal" non-fan locations?

I have a picture of the RH side of a fan-equipped Rr-27 in 1940 paint
showing the weight data in the "normal" location, yet the dimensional
data is shifted mid-car similar to the fan-side of the car.
John, by early 1953 the mechanical fans originally fitted to SFRD
37365-37389 had been replaced with electric fans, and other cars in the
Rr-30 class had also received electric fans. I have a photo of SFRD
37315 with electric fans installed (and black-painted side hardware)
which I could scan for you if it would be useful.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Dairy Shippers Despatch cars?

Earl Tuson
 

Early in its history, Dairy Shippers actually shipped dairy products...
By the post-WW-II period, however, DSDX traffic was mostly, if not entirely, beer...
Three DSDX cars showed up in the 1929-30 B&M Wheel report I am working with. Two, 1427 & 1455, were carrying unspecified 'beverages' destined for Grand Island, NE, and Grand Forks, ND, respectively, while a third, 7030, was being moved empty to White River Jct, VT. That seems like a long way to move beer, but it surely isn't milk!

Earl Tuson


Re: Renting of freight cars to the Yakima Valley Transportation Co.

destron@...
 


NONE was I believe the New Orleans Northeastern and a subsidary of
either the Sou or the L&N, most likely the L&N.
NONE was indeed the New Orleans & Northeastern, and it was (at least later
on) affiliated with the Southern Railway.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

-----
http://hydrorail.hostwq.net/index.html - Rails along the Fraser
http://hydrorail.rrpicturearchives.net/ - Rail Photos


Re: Renting of freight cars to the Yakima Valley Transportation Co.

George Simmons
 

--- In STMFC@..., "railsnw1" <railsnw@...> wrote:

Warning: this might be long for some and I hope the formatting
stays
together.

Beginning in mid 2007 I started researching the corporate files of
the Yakima Valley Transportation Company which are held by the
Yakima
Valley Museum in Yakima, Washington. These files cover almost all
aspects of the YVT from 1907 to the early 1980's. One of the main
components of this collection are the letter files, which as the
name
implies, contain copies of letters arranged by different file
numbers. One of these Letter File's is 15-10, Car Rentals. Before
delving into this file a little history of the YVT is probably in
order for those not aware of it.
...
So here is where I could use your help. Some of these reporting
marks
are from railroads I'm not aware of such as A&V, CH&D, CI&W, DC,
DH&C, DS, FRL, FS&W, H&TC, NODM, NONE, and so on. I have faithfully
transcribed this data so I know some might be typos from the
original
lists. So if you have a chance to visit the list and check things
out
it is appreciated.

I looked at the list before reading this message and was wondering if
NODM might not be a typo for the NOTM or New Orleans, Texas and
Mexico which was a one time SLSF then MP subsidary running between
New Orleans via Baton Rouge the Opelousas to Kinder, De Quincy,
Beaumont and then Houston. Texas law at the time required roads that
operated in Texas to be a Texas charter company.

NONE was I believe the New Orleans Northeastern and a subsidary of
either the Sou or the L&N, most likely the L&N.

George Simmons
Dry Prong, LA

126841 - 126860 of 197043