Date   

AAMX 2002 (was Re: fallen flags site)

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Carl Marsico wrote:
"On the topic of Steam Era cars photographed in the 60's, anyone have
any information regarding this one? (AAMX 2002) Here's the link:
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/displayimage.php?i=19295

This is clearly a USRA DS boxcar; however, I've never been able to
track down the lineage of this car. At some point, its lower door
track rollers were replaced; the only cars I've seen with this feature
are some Frisco cars, but this is a tenuous connection onwhich to base
assumptions.


Ben Hom


Re: Hercules 8000g Type 21 Tanks

Raymond Young
 

Hello all,

Concentrated Sulfuric Acid is used in the process to absorb water given off in the reaction between Nitriic Acid and Glycerin. There would probably be some Sulfuric Acid cars going to the plant. Children: Don't try this at home!

Regards,

Virgil Young
Amarillo, TX

----- Original Message ----
From: Larry Jackman <Ljack70117@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 28, 2008 12:34:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Hercules 8000g Type 21 Tanks

Nitro is a little pill you take when you have heart problems.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@comcast. net
Boca Raton FL 33434
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left.

On Feb 28, 2008, at 12:59 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

John Carty wrote:
You are correct, no sane person would ship nitroglycerin by tank car.
The components (nitro and glycerin) would ship that way, as both are
essentially inert.
Don't know what "nitro" is, but you can make the explosive by
reacting nitric acid with glycerin. I don't know if that's the
commercial process.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress. com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,
thompson@signaturep ress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: fallen flags site

Carl J. Marsico <Carlmarsico@...>
 

On the topic of Steam Era cars photographed in the 60's, anyone have any information regarding this one? (AAMX 2002) Here's the link:

http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/displayimage.php?i=19295

CJM


John Hile <john66h@...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Has anyone found steam era freight car at the fallen flags web site in
files besides Erie and the ACF?
Ed,

The Jim Sands photos, typically from Marshalltown IA in the late '60's
sometimes prove useful.

-John Hile


Re: fallen flags site

John Hile <john66h@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Has anyone found steam era freight car at the fallen flags web site in
files besides Erie and the ACF?
Ed,

The Jim Sands photos, typically from Marshalltown IA in the late '60's
sometimes prove useful.

-John Hile


Re: Modeling possibilities?

Carl J. Marsico <Carlmarsico@...>
 

For clarification, the "outdated" was in reference to newly manufactured cars (with exceptions, e.g. flatcars) vs. cars in service.

In response to the original "why is it that the feature distinguishing steam-era freight cars from modern era seems to be the long vertical brake wheel shafting as opposed to the short horizontal brake wheel shaft seen on modern freight cars?", I don't consider it a good "litmus test".

CJM

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...> wrote:
Carl Marsico wrote:
"It depends when you make the cut-off from "steam" to "modern" If you
go by the definitions set by STMFC and MFCL, the cut-off is 1960, and
by that time, the "long vertical brake wheel shafting" was outdated."

Outdated, perhaps, but a sizable number of older cars still had this
arrangement into the 1960s. Additionally, "long vertical brake wheel
shafting" doesn't necessarily mean a lack of power hand brakes on a car
either, particularly for flat cars.

Ben Hom


Re: Modeling possibilities?

water.kresse@...
 

Folks,

The vertical shaft hand brake, except for removeable wheels and shafts on drop-end gons, dissappeared from (replaced by the "new" gear and chain with horizontal shaft wheels) on new C&O hops and gons in the mid-30s. You can still find vertical shaft FCs in mainline service into the late-fifties . . . . example: repainted C&O LCL Svc blue and yellow boxes in 1957 still had vertical hand brakes.

I'm not sure if the AAR made the gear-type hand brake "standard for new" in 1934?

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>

On Feb 28, 2008, at 11:07 AM, J. W. wrote:

Hi Steam Era Friends,

On a similar subject regarding gons, why is it that
the feature distinguishing steam-era freight cars from
modern era seems to be the long vertical brake wheel
shafting as opposed to the short horizontal brake
wheel shaft seen on modern freight cars?
The practice of building cars with vertical wheel (horizontal shaft)
power hand brakes began well before WWII. Thus, I'm not sure that
your claim that this feature distinguishing "modern" from steam era
freight cars is supportable unless you define the "modern era" as
post 1930 or so <G>. That said, the NYC car featured in your link,

http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-726083.jpg
with an apparent build date of 1944, appears to be a bit of an
anachronism, even when built!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Hercules 8000g Type 21 Tanks

Larry Jackman <Ljack70117@...>
 

Nitro is a little pill you take when you have heart problems.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...
Boca Raton FL 33434
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left.

On Feb 28, 2008, at 12:59 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

John Carty wrote:
You are correct, no sane person would ship nitroglycerin by tank car.
The components (nitro and glycerin) would ship that way, as both are
essentially inert.
Don't know what "nitro" is, but you can make the explosive by
reacting nitric acid with glycerin. I don't know if that's the
commercial process.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Hercules 8000g Type 21 Tanks

John Hile <john66h@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

My guess - based on the origin of the cars and Hercules' business in
printing and paper chemicals - is that they were hauling paper-making
chemicals.
I believe Kurt is on the right track here. From the nice Hercules
company history at
http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/Hercules-Inc-Company-History.html

"The paper products division began in 1931 with the purchase of Paper
Makers Chemical Corporation, which provided 70 percent of U.S. demand
for the rosin "sizing" used to stiffen paper."


-John Hile


Re: (unknown)

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Guyz,

Lets be honest here, If one is a member of this, and other proto lists, they have passed the hobby stage. Proto RRing is a magnificent obsession; surpassed only by love of family. I don't see it as an illness; more a passion from the soul to be expressed. The only folks who don't know how enriching this hobby can be are the ones who haven't tried it.

Fred Freitas
Bennington, Vt

Dan Hall <dhallfsm@...> wrote:


Dan

There's a fine line between hobby and mental illness.


Re: fallen flags site

destron@...
 

I've found a bunch scattered throughout the site - though a lot of them
are post-1960 photos of STMFCs.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Has anyone found steam era freight car at the fallen flags web site in
files besides Erie and the ACF?

In the Erie files any freight car credited to Dan Biernacki is "steam
era". EL was formed in 1960, the cutoff for this group. There are some
other STMFCs in the Erie folders too.

Dan rescued a lot of negatives in the Erie RR achive from a dumpster.

Ed




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fallen flags site

ed_mines
 

Has anyone found steam era freight car at the fallen flags web site in
files besides Erie and the ACF?

In the Erie files any freight car credited to Dan Biernacki is "steam
era". EL was formed in 1960, the cutoff for this group. There are some
other STMFCs in the Erie folders too.

Dan rescued a lot of negatives in the Erie RR achive from a dumpster.

Ed


Re: Hercules 8000g Type 21 Tanks

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

John Carty wrote:
You are correct, no sane person would ship nitroglycerin by tank car. The components (nitro and glycerin) would ship that way, as both are essentially inert.
Don't know what "nitro" is, but you can make the explosive by reacting nitric acid with glycerin. I don't know if that's the commercial process.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Modeling possibilities?

Bruce Smith
 

On Feb 28, 2008, at 11:07 AM, J. W. wrote:

Hi Steam Era Friends,

On a similar subject regarding gons, why is it that
the feature distinguishing steam-era freight cars from
modern era seems to be the long vertical brake wheel
shafting as opposed to the short horizontal brake
wheel shaft seen on modern freight cars?
The practice of building cars with vertical wheel (horizontal shaft) power hand brakes began well before WWII. Thus, I'm not sure that your claim that this feature distinguishing "modern" from steam era freight cars is supportable unless you define the "modern era" as post 1930 or so <G>. That said, the NYC car featured in your link,

http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-726083.jpg
with an apparent build date of 1944, appears to be a bit of an anachronism, even when built!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Modeling possibilities?

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Carl Marsico wrote:
"It depends when you make the cut-off from "steam" to "modern" If you
go by the definitions set by STMFC and MFCL, the cut-off is 1960, and
by that time, the "long vertical brake wheel shafting" was outdated."

Outdated, perhaps, but a sizable number of older cars still had this
arrangement into the 1960s. Additionally, "long vertical brake wheel
shafting" doesn't necessarily mean a lack of power hand brakes on a car
either, particularly for flat cars.


Ben Hom


Re: Modeling possibilities?

Carl J. Marsico <Carlmarsico@...>
 

"J. W." <ln_f7@...> wrote:

"distinguishing steam-era freight cars from modern era " <snip>

It depends when you make the cut-off from "steam" to "modern" If you go by the definitions set by STMFC and MFCL, the cut-off is 1960, and by that time, the "long vertical brake wheel shafting" was outdated.

Carl J. Marsico


Re: Modeling possibilities?

El Jefe
 

Hi Steam Era Friends,

On a similar subject regarding gons, why is it that
the feature distinguishing steam-era freight cars from
modern era seems to be the long vertical brake wheel
shafting as opposed to the short horizontal brake
wheel shaft seen on modern freight cars? Check out an
example:

http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-726083.jpg

If the service life of this NYC 623-G lot car lasted
until 1982, would it be a good guess that Despatch
shops or whoever updated the look of the car to have a
more modern brake wheel arrangement?

New to group with a newbie kind of question.

Allen Smithee
California, U.S.A.







____________________________________________________________________________________
Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs


REA Volume Vans

Dan Hall
 

Sorry for the previous blank post. Another iPhone accident.

I'm looking for photos of the green, corrugated side Fruehauf Volume Vans that were operated by Railway Express. I have the right side shot that's in the Roseman book, but I'm wondering if there are any others out there.

Thanks,

Dan Hall


Re: Hercules 8000g Type 21 Tanks

daylines_johncarty <johnpcarty@...>
 

You are correct, no sane person would ship nitroglycerin by tank
car. The components (nitro and glycerin) would ship that way, as
both are essentially inert.

John

--- In STMFC@..., "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

My guess - based on the origin of the cars and Hercules' business
in
printing and paper chemicals - is that they were hauling paper-
making
chemicals.

Think about it: If they acquired a company that used and owned
tank cars,
wouldn't it be logical for them to continue those tank cars in the
same
service?

With respect to nitroglycerin, I can assure you from my time
working with
nitroglycerin at Hercules' Magna Utah explosives plant that it
would be
impossible to transport nitrogylcerin in a conventional tank car.
I suspect
you'll find that it was also illegal.

KL

----- Original Message -----
--- In STMFC@..., "John Hile" <john66h@> wrote:

Hello All,

I've gathered the following info on Hercules Powder Co (HPCX)
8000g,
type 21 tanks with the hope of modeling a couple circa 1952-53
using
the factory decorated Proto 2000 kits. As I understand it, these
cars
are former Paper Makers Chem Co (PMCX) which received new
reporting
marks but kept their orig numbers when Hercules acquired PMC.


(No subject)

Dan Hall
 

Dan


There's a fine line between hobby and mental illness.


Re: Mystery Gons

water.kresse@...
 

Great pictures!! I thought I was the only one who couldn't find them posted. Fine mess I would say?

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...>

I see the photos of these mystery gons were finally approved. I am looking
for information on the manufacture of these cars. The ends on the drop
bottom in photo #1 has me wondering, as well as the side stake spacing in
photo #2. The photos are in the "mystery gons" photo album.
http://ph.groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/browse/47bb?c=

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

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