Date   

Re: GN 3000-3499 series

olin4812
 

The problem is most of the prototype cars with 16' doors like the MDC
tooling had 4:4 ends (and were 10'6" high).

Olin Dirks
Omaha NE


Re: GN 3000-3499 series

olin4812
 

The problem is most of the prototype cars with 16' doors like the MDC
tooling had 4:4 ends (and were 10'6" high).

Olin Dirks
Omaha NE


Re: GN 3000-3499 series

Tim O'Connor
 

The tooling for these cars is relatively new; before the Horizon
takeover, MDC introduced a double door car based on their revised
prewar AAR boxcar tooling. These models have 4/5 Dreadnaught ends,
rectangular panel roofs, and the doors are molded on the carbody.
Ben Hom
I didn't know that -- it sounds like this car might be similar
to some of the 1940's era 40' automobile box cars? Has anyone tried
to find the closest match (e.g IC/SP/ATSF/MKT/SLSF/CB&Q/UP/GM&O)?

Tim O'Connor


Re: tanks on flatcars one more time

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Hi Don:

I'll trade ya - you tell me what numbers are on the sides and I'll tell ya what the unit markings are!

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Don Worthy

One thing that I can't determine from my own photos or the ones in the book, is the lettering on the equipment. I'd like to be able to read the division, company and such.

The books photos are shots made "in action" so the only thing that is not covered up by mud or stowed equipment is the tanks number.

Could some of you help me with the proper designation "lettering" for my tanks and trucks.


Re: Buyer Beware: InterMountain Milwaukee Road Rib-Side Box Car

Tim O'Connor
 

Ed and all, I just got my car, the 1959 version...
==================================================

Ed Hawkins wrote
The right side of the car lacks a horizontal raised overlapping
seam that runs continuously just above the side sill.
Yeah, kinda goofy, but let's be fair: Red Caboose omitted a
number of important details on its PFE wood reefers, but I don't
hear a lot of griping about it... I had to look a couple of times
to see what you meant.

Also, unlike AAR box cars, the top of the Milwaukee Road end
was flat across the top and the roof was prefabricated by
welding and applied as a single unit. This resulted in a prominent
horizontal flange at the top of the end that is quite visible in
any photo showing the end. The top of the InterMountain end is
flush and lacks this flange.
Ed, my model has a horizontal thingy, seam or flange. On both ends.
It's exactly level with the car sides and appears to represent the
roof weld seam that you describe. It's not on the Ribside cars.

The formed double roof corrugations.... are too short near the
edge of the roof.
Yep, another funky IM roof. Not their first! And the row of rivets
on the roof is silly, I admit. But the Ribside roof is very noticeably
screwed up because it lacks seam caps! Ugh! From 18" away wearing my
reading glasses, I cannot see the rivets. That's the truth. :-(

And hey, check out those 9 rung ladders! Nice! And the Universal
brakewheel, it's a beauty! And they used wire for the brake rods.
And I think the side height above the doors looks better than the
Ribside cars and MUCH better than my old NJI brass cars.

Is it a museum quality model? Nope. Is it an imperfect but perfectly
serviceable model for a layout? Yes, I think so. If I didn't already
have several Ribside cars, I'd get more of these.

Tim O'Connor, former RPA, now just RTR.


Re: ATSF 143311 to 144310 Class Bx37

Charlie Vlk
 

Richard-
If the answer was simple I wouldn't have asked the question :-) !!!
I am not asking for somebody to spend hours doing research for me......not being a expert in any
railroad other than CB&Q (and being smart enough to know that the more I know the less I know)
I was just asking for leads.
I have found some information in the RPCs and no doubt will find more in magazine articles.
I am subscribing to the RR Heritage Website and have a pretty good library myself and access to other
researcher's collections.... but so much has been published that (as you know) you can't have everything
that you'd like to have. Even when I was at Kato and had deeper pockets to build a library there were many
choices that had to be made.
To add to the problem my interests and professional activities aren't limited to one era, railroad, or locomotives,
passenger cars, or freight cars. One day I might be working on artwork for a SP Daylight Coach and the next
a paint scheme for a Australian BHP Mining AC6000... or a Big Boy or a Trackmobile.
Sometimes I know in advance about a project but often my assignments are fairly short fuse.... and often I get
the job after the product is designed... and very seldom get any research package or information from the
customer.
For this reason I often have to rely on the internet (either posted photos and information or the assistance of
experts) to get enough information to do a project. There is a lot of information out there but it is spotty... sometimes
you hit a goldmine on a project but often the gaps in coverage magically coincide with the very car or locomotive
that you are workiing on.....
...but you guys already know that!!!
Thanks,
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, April 23, 2008 4:23 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] ATSF 143311 to 144310 Class Bx37



On Apr 23, 2008, at 11:03 AM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

> I am preparing artwork for ATSF 1941 Pullman-built Bx37 boxcars
> with the straight line herald.
> I wonder if anyone can direct me to online resources for these
> cars. I have the
> photo of the map side of the 143798 and would like to know what
> slogan(s) were on this series
> and what they looked like.
>

Charlie, there's no simple answer to your question - the Bx-37 class
consisted of over 5,000 cars and slogan assignments (not to mention
variations in trucks) were complicated. All of the relevant
information is in my book on painting and lettering and John Dobyne's
book on Santa Fe boxcars, both published by the Santa Fe Railway
Historical & Modeling Society and both currently in print and
available on the society's website. Like a lot of other information
on freight car history, it is NOT available anywhere on the
internet. And at the risk of sounding ungracious, I'm not going to
spend the next two or three hours at the keyboard recapitulating it
for you and scanning photos. Been there, done that, wrote the book.

Richard Hendrickson


Athearn 40' Auto Car

Guy Wilber
 

Olin wrote:

problem is most of the prototype cars with 16' doors like the MDC
tooling had 4:4 ends (and were 10'6" high).
Looking at the photos on the Athearn site it would appear that the doors are
between 14 and 15 foot in width. Have you actually measured the door width
and the height of the car?

Regards,

Guy Wilber
West Bend, WI





**************Need a new ride? Check out the largest site for U.S. used car
listings at AOL Autos.
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Re: "The Postwar Freight Car Fleet" - where to get a copy

SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 4/23/2008 9:36:17 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
rule292@... writes:

Anyone know where there might be remaining a copy of Ted C's "The
Postwar Freight Car Fleet" that I could purchase?

A while ago I emailed Speedwich but got no reply. I'm guessing the
spam filter saw the "Rule292" name and considered it spam.



They are sold out at Speedwich. About two weeks ago there was one on
Amazon.com used for $250.00. (I remember think "glad I ordered it early".) It is
gone now but you may want to check there occasionally. Other than that used
book dealers are your best bet.

Rich Orr



**************Need a new ride? Check out the largest site for U.S. used car
listings at AOL Autos.
(http://autos.aol.com/used?NCID=aolcmp00300000002851)


Re: ATSF 143311 to 144310 Class Bx37

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 23, 2008, at 11:03 AM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

I am preparing artwork for ATSF 1941 Pullman-built Bx37 boxcars
with the straight line herald.
I wonder if anyone can direct me to online resources for these
cars. I have the
photo of the map side of the 143798 and would like to know what
slogan(s) were on this series
and what they looked like.







Charlie, there's no simple answer to your question - the Bx-37 class
consisted of over 5,000 cars and slogan assignments (not to mention
variations in trucks) were complicated. All of the relevant
information is in my book on painting and lettering and John Dobyne's
book on Santa Fe boxcars, both published by the Santa Fe Railway
Historical & Modeling Society and both currently in print and
available on the society's website. Like a lot of other information
on freight car history, it is NOT available anywhere on the
internet. And at the risk of sounding ungracious, I'm not going to
spend the next two or three hours at the keyboard recapitulating it
for you and scanning photos. Been there, done that, wrote the book.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: tanks on flatcars one more time - M113s this time

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Speaking only about the period 1960 through 1987 Army vehicles
always* got there "bumper" numbers when they finally reached the
company-level unit. The serial number came from depot or maybe
higher. Flats loaded with vehicles with minimal markings would be OK.

(* - the absolute "always" should probably be qualified in some way
because someone somewhere will find an exception.)

Gene Green
Out in the west Texas town of El Paso
and ducking for cover.

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:

If VN-era photos are indicators, then here are my observations:
Pix of M113s on TTX flats (4 each) show tarps on their tops and only
marked US Army, then a number. This was on their sides, on the top
corner of with the front slope. They apparently got their markings
at their deployment site.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: Don Worthy <don_worthy@...>
Guys, I've got the book "Marine Tank Battles of the Korean War". It
is full of photos of the late model Sherman tanks in action along
side the new M26.

The author states that the Sherman tanks were, also, the 1st on the
scene as they were already in Japan. Also, a large number of half
tracks with the quad 50 cals were used.

I, also, have photos of these late model (M4A3 with the VVHS
suspension) which had both 76mm in the T26 turret and the 105mm guns
on flatcars leaving a camp in Georgia. I have been unable in finding
out "just" which camp, although. A few guys think it must have been
Ft. Benning.

Any way, the photos show one tank per flatcar. Two flats are
clearly visible and a third flat has two trucks (2 1/2 ton).

One thing that I can't determine from my own photos or the ones in
the book, is the lettering on the equipment. I'd like to be able to
read the division, company and such.

The books photos are shots made "in action" so the only thing that
is not covered up by mud or stowed equipment is the tanks number.

Could some of you help me with the proper designation "lettering"
for my tanks and trucks.

I'm wanting my equipment to represent the 2nd Marines which carried
on a large part of the 1st battles of Korea.

Thanks

Don Worthy

__________________________________________________________
Be a better friend, newshound, and
know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: tanks on flatcars one more time - M113s this time

water.kresse@...
 

If VN-era photos are indicators, then here are my observations: Pix of M113s on TTX flats (4 each) show tarps on their tops and only marked US Army, then a number. This was on their sides, on the top corner of with the front slope. They apparently got their markings at their deployment site.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: Don Worthy <don_worthy@...>
Guys, I've got the book "Marine Tank Battles of the Korean War". It is full of photos of the late model Sherman tanks in action along side the new M26.

The author states that the Sherman tanks were, also, the 1st on the scene as they were already in Japan. Also, a large number of half tracks with the quad 50 cals were used.

I, also, have photos of these late model (M4A3 with the VVHS suspension) which had both 76mm in the T26 turret and the 105mm guns on flatcars leaving a camp in Georgia. I have been unable in finding out "just" which camp, although. A few guys think it must have been Ft. Benning.

Any way, the photos show one tank per flatcar. Two flats are clearly visible and a third flat has two trucks (2 1/2 ton).

One thing that I can't determine from my own photos or the ones in the book, is the lettering on the equipment. I'd like to be able to read the division, company and such.

The books photos are shots made "in action" so the only thing that is not covered up by mud or stowed equipment is the tanks number.

Could some of you help me with the proper designation "lettering" for my tanks and trucks.

I'm wanting my equipment to represent the 2nd Marines which carried on a large part of the 1st battles of Korea.

Thanks

Don Worthy

__________________________________________________________
Be a better friend, newshound, and
know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ


ATSF 143311 to 144310 Class Bx37

Charlie Vlk
 

I am preparing artwork for ATSF 1941 Pullman-built Bx37 boxcars with the straight line herald.
I wonder if anyone can direct me to online resources for these cars. I have the
photo of the map side of the 143798 and would like to know what slogan(s) were on this series
and what they looked like.
Thank you,
Charlie Vlk


Re: tanks on flatcars one more time

Frank Pearsall
 

Good afternoon:

If you want your tanks to represent Marine Corps equipment, here's some information I hope is helpful.

Any tanks that came from Japan would have been U.S. Army. In 1950, there were no Marine tank units in Japan.

The first Marine tanks arrived in Korea on August 2, 1950 as part of the 1st Marine Provisional Brigade. (It was Company A, 1st Tank Battalion, 1st Marine Division, previously at Camp Pendleton, Calif.) Further, the 1st Tank Battalion had been augmented by personnel from the 2nd Tank Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, Camp Lejeune, N.C.

The 3rd Tank Battalion, 3rd Marine Division was reactivated in 1952 and was sent to Japan.

When you used the term "2nd Marines" in your message, that would refer to the 2nd Marine Regiment. The infantry regiment that came with the 1st Marine Provisional Brigade was the 5th Marines. You'd have to dig around a bit to find out what 2nd Marine Regiments were in Korea later on.

As to the mention of Fort Benning, that's an Army post in Georgia. I doubt any Marine tanks would have been shipped from there.

As to specific equipment in Korea, you can probably google around and find out more information. I remember seeing 3rd Tank Battalion equipment at Camp Hansen on Okinawa in 1959. If I remember correctly, they were M-41s.

Frank Pearsall
Brevard, N.C.


Guys,
I've got the book "Marine Tank Battles of the Korean War". It is full of photos of the late model Sherman tanks in action along side the new M26.

The author states the Sherman tanks were the first on the scene as they were already in Japan. Also, a large number of half tracks with the quad 50 cals were used.

I also have photos of these late model (M4A3 with the VVHS suspension) which had both 76mm in the T26 turret and the 105mm guns on flatcars leaving a camp in Georgia. I have been unable in finding out which camp, although a few guys think it must have been Ft. Benning.

Any way, the photos show one tank per flatcar. Two flats are clearly visible and a third flat has two trucks (2 1/2 ton).

I'm wanting my equipment to represent the 2nd Marines which carried on a large part of the first battles of Korea.

Thanks

Don Worthy


Re: ACL gondola ?

Bill Kelly
 

John,
Are these the ACL 90000-90499 and ACL 99300-99443 series cars ?

Later,
Bill Kelly


John Golden wrote:
snip <
HOWEVER...you're in luck. ACL acquired 500 USRA gondolas in 1918
(for which the Proto 1000 model IS correct) and some of them--as many
as
249--were still reported on the roster by 1950. ACL also acquired
USRA gondolas in 1946 with the AB&C merger and 141 of them were
reported
on the roster in 1950. Here are my notes on the ACL cars:

- 40' Composite-side USRA gondola, Class GS
- 500 cars acquired new by ACL in 1918 from ACF
- No known ACL car class designation
- Most cars remaining after WW II rebuilt with steel sides; cars
later
modified for stump service
- Features:
- IL: (41' 6"), IH: (4' 8"); 100,000 lbs. cap'y
- By 1949, all with AB brakes; Railway Devices Ratchet-lever brake
device
- Flat, all-steel underframe
- Only known ACL gondolas with Carmer uncoupling devices
- Andrews trucks (ACL class T-9-B), 33" wheels
- Black with white lettering


Re: GN 3000-3499 series

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Robert D. Heninger wrote:
"I am not sure what tooling Athearn is using for these cars, it
doesn't
seem to be new, and I don't think any other HO model has this rivet
line present."

The tooling for these cars is relatively new; before the Horizon
takeover, MDC introduced a double door car based on their revised
prewar AAR boxcar tooling. These models have 4/5 Dreadnaught ends,
rectangular panel roofs, and the doors are molded on the carbody.


Ben Hom
Thanks Ben. I was unaware of the MDC car. The roof on the prototype
is a diagonal panel, and the end is a 1/3/4 Late IDE.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Stanley, ND


Calling DAVE OWENS

golden1014
 

Hey Dave,

Can you please contact me off-line at
Golden1014@...? I'd like to advertise NE RPM in
the next SCL Modeler and need the scoop. Thanks!

John



John Golden
Bloomington, IN

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014
http://s-clmodeler.aclsal.org/currentissue/s-clmodeler2008-1.pdf


Re: ACL gondola ?

fiddlertrain
 

John
You are a peach. That's what I thought was righ but when working
with resin kit I like to get it right the first time. And yes sir I
would appriciate the photo if you have the time. Again my thanks.
FIDEL C. GOODNIGHT
CEO Goodnight Mountain RR

--- In STMFC@..., "John Golden" <golden1014@...> wrote:

Sir,

Technically, the Proto 1000 model is incorrect for the model
referenced in your query. Marty's model of ACL 94231--seen at
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/models/mcguirk/acl94231main.
ht
ml --is a model of the ACL K-12 class cars. My notes about the K-
12s
are as follows:

- ACL K-12 class, 40' composite-side gondola, class GB
- 700 cars from Bethlehem Steel, delivered 1943
- Series 93900 - 94599
- Composite-side construction (replaced with steel beginning in
1950),
wood floor
- A "war emergency" gondola; slightly higher/longer than K-11
- Features:
- IL: 41' 6", IH: 4' 8", 100K cap'y
- AB brakes and Miner brake wheel
- Dreadnaught ends (four corrugations with darts)
- Flat, all-steel underframe
- ARA trucks (ACL class T-9-D), 33" wheels
- Delivered in black with white lettering; Updated with Prismo
blocks
after 1951

HOWEVER...you're in luck. ACL acquired 500 USRA gondolas in 1918
(for
which the Proto 1000 model IS correct) and some of them--as many
as
249--were still reported on the roster by 1950. ACL also acquired
USRA
gondolas in 1946 with the AB&C merger and 141 of them were
reported on
the roster in 1950. Here are my notes on the ACL cars:

- 40' Composite-side USRA gondola, Class GS
- 500 cars acquired new by ACL in 1918 from ACF
- No known ACL car class designation
- Most cars remaining after WW II rebuilt with steel sides; cars
later
modified for stump service
- Features:
- IL: (41' 6"), IH: (4' 8"); 100,000 lbs. cap'y
- By 1949, all with AB brakes; Railway Devices Ratchet-lever brake
device
- Flat, all-steel underframe
- Only known ACL gondolas with Carmer uncoupling devices
- Andrews trucks (ACL class T-9-B), 33" wheels
- Black with white lettering

Photos of the ACL USRA cars circa 1950 are rare--if any exist I've
never seen them, and the Society doesn't have any either.

As far as your modeling goes, it's certainly within your right to
paint the models as K-12s, but I'd recommend painting them as
ACL's
USRA cars or ACL's former-AB&C cars to make them more
prototypically
accurate. The ACL & SAL Society has a newly-released AB&C decal
set
that would work, and I can send you a photo of the prototype AB&C
car
if you wish. I think it is plausible that a few cars were still in
AB&C paint in 1950. I also have a photo of an ACL USRA gon in
later
years with steel sides--you may be able to approximate ACL's 1950
paint scheme from that photo.

John Golden
Bloomington, IN










--- In STMFC@..., "fiddlertrain" <fiddlertrain@> wrote:

Hi
I was admiring Marty McGuirk's F&C ACL gon on the old SEFC web
site
and
I accquired 2. My question is i model 1950 and I had gotten2
proto
1000
gons that were painted box car red. I upgraded them with wood
interior
planking and grab iron but his is painted black. For 1950 which
would
be correct? By the way nise job Marty.
Fidel C. Goodnight


Re: New coupler in sight?

Manfred Lorenz
 

Good morning. Thanks for the quote. I see you'r still in need of a
coffee, aren'tya? ;-) I was referring to the Reboxx efforts.

Manfred

--- In STMFC@..., Frank Pearsall <plans@...> wrote:

Good morning:

If you go to the Sergent Engineering web site, there is the
following
statement:

"Sergent Engineering is currently retooling the HO scale product
line.
We expect this retooling to improve reliability, ease of assembly,
and
accuracy of the products. This operation has already been underway
for
several months and is currently expected to be completed in May
2008.
Unfortunately, until then we will be out of stock on EC87 and EN87
products. Please keep an eye on this website for updated
information."

Frank Pearsall
Brevard, N.C.

On Apr 23, 2008, at 4:53 AM, Manfred Lorenz wrote:

While I am converting my fleet to Sergents I still remember some
faint
hints at a new, even more realistic coupler in the making (at
whatever
state) by the Reboxx owner that were floated some time ago.

Manfred


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: GN 3000-3499 series

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Robert D. Heninger wrote:
"I am not sure what tooling Athearn is using for these cars, it doesn't
seem to be new, and I don't think any other HO model has this rivet
line present."

The tooling for these cars is relatively new; before the Horizon
takeover, MDC introduced a double door car based on their revised
prewar AAR boxcar tooling. These models have 4/5 Dreadnaught ends,
rectangular panel roofs, and the doors are molded on the carbody.


Ben Hom


ACL watermelon car: Thanks

Stephen Bishop
 

My thanks to everyone who helped. FYI: the car I drew (18303) said WX 6-55 on the side and I recall seeing it (or its twins) in the late 50s in Auburn, Maine. The local supermarket would bring in a load of watermelons for 4th of July and sell them right out of the car, on a siding across the street.

Thanks again.

Steve Bishop

125221 - 125240 of 197025