Date   

Re: New Tahoe Truck

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@> wrote:


Walter Clark wrote:
Now, still on SP, boxcars and trucks, which is, in your opinion,
the
best of the available Bettendorf T-section 50 ton trucks? I'm
afraid
to count how many kits I have that need those.
Please keep in mind that other foundries made T-section trucks,
not exactly matching the Bettendorf version. Prominent among them for
SP modelers is the Columbia Steel version.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@
Publishers of books on railroad history
Tony,

I know I'm beginning to sound like a broken record, but just how
different were the Bettendorf and Columbia Steel versions of the
T-Section truck, and which model, in your opinion, most closely
matches the Columbia Steel version?

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA
Okay, since I posted the reply above I've dug out three books about
SP/PFE and done some research.

According to "Pacific Fruit Express" by Anthony W. Thompson, Robert J.
Church and Bruce H. Jones, the R-30-11 reefers "received PFE's first
cast steel truck side frames on new cars. They were a Bettendorf
design resembling but slightly different that the later "T-section"
design." Then, following the first group of R-30-12 cars that
received Vulcan trucks (1920-built cars, approximately 3,000 cars,
though two number series were built in 1920-21 and I can't tell
whether the 1921 cars had Vulcan or Bettendorf T-section) the rest of
the R-30-12 and all the R-30-13 cars received the "true" T-section
trucks, some built by Bettendorf and some by ASF (19,329 total). I
couldn't find a breakdown between Bettendorf and ASF, but even if half
the cars had Bettendorf that is 9,665 (rounded). These were used
until the ARA cast-steel U-section trucks "came into use in 1927...."
Two comments: First, these were 40-ton trucks, (though in HO scale
I'm not sure the difference is noticeable) which was more than enough
under 30-ton capacity reefers, and second, I've looked at the photos
and can't see any difference between T-section trucks on any of the
cars pictured.

Then I turned to "Southern Pacific Freight Cars, Volume 3: Automobile
Cars and Flat Cars," by Anthony W. Thompson, because I have kits for
SP A-50-5 (500 cars) & 6 (1,200 cars)(F & C and Northeastern). Both
classes were produced with honest-to-goodness Bettendorf T-section
trucks, so I'm clear about those two (at least <g>).

Next I turned to Volume 4 of the same series, "Box Cars." Prior to
the B-50-6 they received Arch-bar or (B-50-4&5) Andrews.
Pullman-built B-50-6 had Vulcan trucks (5710 cars for various Harriman
roads), the rest (4,675 for various Harriman roads) were Bettendorf
T-section, as were the post-Harriman B-50-8 (1,000 cars).

After the USRA returned control of the railroads to management SP
purchased the B-50-13 & 14 cars in 1924. 250 B-50-13 for Arizona
Eastern received T-section trucks from Columbia Steel and 100 B-50-13
for the Houston and Texas Central received Symington T-section. 3,350
B-50-13 divided between Pacific Electric (200 cars), SP (2,250 cars)
Texas & New Orleans (500 cars) and Houston & Texas Central (400 cars)
received Bettendorf T-section trucks. 3,375 B-50-14 cars, divided
between SP (1,900 cars), Pacific Electric (600 cars), Texas & New
Orleans (800 cars) and SP de Mexico (75 cars) all received Bettendorf
T-section trucks, as did 400 more built to B-50-14 specifications for
the El Paso & Southwestern.

From 1925 through 1928 the B-50-15 & 16 cars were received. 300
B-50-15 for the Morgan's Louisiana & Texas received Arch-bar trucks,
1,100 B-50-15 for SP received ASF T-section trucks, 500 for SP
received Columbia Steel T-section trucks, and the remaining 2,000
B-50-15 (1,500 for SP and 500 for ML&T) received Bettendorf T-section.
503 of the B-50-16 (500 for SP and three for San Diego & Arizona)
received Columbia Steel T-section trucks, with the other 500 for Texas
& New Orleans receiving Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Co. T-section
trucks.

To summarize (if my spreadsheet got everything),

Bettendorf T-section 26,165
ASF T-section 10,764
Columbia Steel T-section 1,253
Symington T-section 100
Tennessee CI&R T-section 500

Other
Arch-bar 300
Vulcan 5,710

So almost 2/3 of the T-section trucks were from Bettendorf. That's
why I was asking specifically about Bettendorf T-section trucks, but
maybe we could expand the question to say which HO trucks most
accurately reflects the appearance of each of the T-section trucks
used by PFE and the SP, subsidiaries and related roads?

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA


Re: Farmers' Institutes

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

There is now an extensive literature on this for most of the
Western railroads. The Orsi book on the SP has been mentioned. There
are also writings for the GN, NP, Milwaukee Road, and Santa Fe (and
probably more). I would suggest Googling your subject matter for
on-line resources and ALSO for booksellers and libraries.

For anyone interested, there is a book entitled "Profiting From The Plains: The Great
Northern Railway and Corporate Development of the American West", written by Claire
Strom, an assistant professor of history at North Dakota State University, my alma mater.
It deals extensively with James J. Hill's efforts to improve the productivity of farmers along
the GN, with the intent of increasing the amount of agricultural products for the GN to
haul to market. Also, the GN's efforts in this area are also discussed in "The Great
Northern Railway: A History", by Hidy, Hidy, Hofsommer, and Scott.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, IA


Re: pulp & paper

armprem
 

Remember,there is paper and then there is Newsprint. Paper products,by
in large,while given care in loading ,didn't recieve as much care as
Newsprint,a higher priority product.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Worthy" <don_worthy@yahoo.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 2:26 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re:pulp & paper


Russ, I can speak about the clay. I've lived and worked in the clay business
my whole life. My dad started in 1946 with (at that time) "Southern Clays"
which became Freeport Kaolin. During my time Freeport was bought by
Engelhard (evil empire).
In the mid 50s they were still experimenting with shipping "slurry". You
might see a tank car ever now and then. In 1959 the Freeport research lab
did come up with a process to get the solids up (and still get it out) so
tank car shipments could be made. (There is a lot more to that issue)
But real tank car shipping for clay did not get going til later in 1960.
The biggest shipping was still done in box cars with bagged clay or bulk.
Even in early 1980s, many customers were still ordering bulk clay in box
cars.
As a car cleaner, we had to clean the in coming cars then put 2"X12" boards
in the box cars that were to be bulk loaded. The boards were put either
across the door ways (whole car is one bin) or across the car at the door
ways, which creates a "bin" on each end of the car with the doorway still
clear. This would be for two different grades of clay.

Many companies were still not set up to receive bulk loaded clay in covered
hoppers during the late 70s and early 80s. Things changed quickly, although,
during this time.
The use of box cars for bulk loading changed so quickly during the early
80s.
Any way, there is much more but, for your time frame there would be boxcars
with bagged and bulk loads with a few two and three bay covered hoppers in
the mix.
Hope that helps
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

--- On Mon, 6/30/08, Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re:pulp & paper
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, June 30, 2008, 10:42 AM






Malcolm,
If your talking about baled market pulp not pulp wood the ratio is 1:1.
That is what I had in mind. Although the weight is 1:1 plus a small
fraction, wouldn't the cube of the finished product be less. I had the
impression that woodpulp might be less dense than the paper. Would 50 tons
of woodpulp fit in 40 ft. car ?

Actually the paper would weigh a bit more due to additives (starch, gum
arabic,etc.. ) and whether it's coated or not.

I think we'll have some tank cars of clay slurry coming in. Was it shipped
as slurry in 1955, or should it come in the powder form in covered hoppers ?
And We'll have the occasional tank car of other materials.

If the car is clean enough to haul pulp bales it's clean enough to haul
paper rolls (which are wrapped with heavy brown kraft paper).

Russ Hass
============ ========

Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478























------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





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2:31 PM


Re: NYC Milk Car 6460

Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

NYC, MDT used a common design for both milk and express cars; there
were over 400 of these cars built in various lots;
the largest quantity of cars were express cars built specifically for
this service in 1929 and numbered in a different series.
Some of the milk cars were rebuilt for express service but many of
them ran till the end of their days as milk cars.
As Armand points out the Rutland cars were were the same basic design.

Roger Hinman

On Jun 30, 2008, at 12:31 PM, Jenrick wrote:

Ed,
While the car shown in the ebay photos may have carried milk, the
car was actually an Express reefer and occaisionaly showed up on the
Fast Mail in ATSF territory.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington. NC
----- Original Message -----
From: armand
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 11:40 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: NYC Milk Car 6460

Marty and group,The NYC and Rutland milk cars were essentially the
same
car,with some minor refinements.Since the Rutland was under NYC 's
control
many of the same designs were used including,locomotives ,rolling
stock and
buildings.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@cox.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 8:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NYC Milk Car 6460

Ed,

Years ago someone (F&C - or molded by F&C for someone else) did a
resin kit for the NYC cars you're referring to. I have no idea if
they're still available. I never built one, but remember Andy
Sperandeo had one and was underwhelmed by the quality of the kit in
general.

I noticed in the last Naperville flyer I received from Martin Lofton
that Sunshine's 2009 model year would include a milk car - I can't
remember the entire description (it was very brief) but I do know it
mentioned a "CV" milkcar. I can't find the flyer (we've just
moved) -- but I do know the way it was described (Rutland/CV
milkcar????) it sounded to me like a typo and it should have been
Rutland/NYC milkcar. Which, of course, would make sense and could
very well be the car you're looking for.

I'll look for the flyer this week - but perhaps someone else has a
copy a little closer to hand.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Edward Sommer <ejsommer@...> wrote:

Group,
I asked this question on the PCL when this was posted there and
did receive a couple of responses. I know there are a couple of NYC
experts on this list so I'll ask again: does anyone know if there
is an HO model of this milk car. I ask because these cars show up
in the consist lists of the book "Ghost Trains of the SP", the book
on the Overland mail trains and I would like to have one of these
cars for my train.
TIA,
Ed Sommer
San Jose, CA



----- Original Message ----
From: rwitt_2000 <rwitt_2000@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, June 28, 2008 12:03:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] NYC Milk Car 6460

This item was recently placed on ebay.

PICTURES OF NYC MILK CAR 6460, SIDE AND END VIEW AND A SMALL
BLUEPRINT,
MEASURES APPROX 8 X 12.", A B & W PHOTO

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
ViewItem&item=180258556675&ssPageNa&#92;
&#92;
me=ADME:B:SS:US:1123
<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
ViewItem&item=180258556675&ssPageN&#92;
ame=ADME:B:SS:US:1123>

Bob Witt

I also posted this on the Passenger Car List


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2:31 PM





Re: GREGG COMPANY

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

joel norman wrote:
QUESTION:I have a 1952{19th edition}Car Builders Cyclopedia and theres a section with freight cars from a builder named GREGG,looks like there product line all for export,did they build anything for American use??
Very little. If you want to know more, Ed Kaminski self-published a nice book about Gregg, with the full cooperation of the Gregg people of today--they do a respectable business in PARTS for all that equipment which is in use all over the world. They opened their archives to Ed.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Farmers' Institutes

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Thomas Baker wrote:
I have been looking back in company magazines from the Chicago Great Western during the Twenties. I noticed several references to "farmers' institutes" . . . Does anyone on the list know how long the railroads followed such a policy? In any case, such programs suggest a symbiosis between the railroad and the locales it served unknown today and unknown for quite some time.
There is now an extensive literature on this for most of the Western railroads. The Orsi book on the SP has been mentioned. There are also writings for the GN, NP, Milwaukee Road, and Santa Fe (and probably more). I would suggest Googling your subject matter for on-line resources and ALSO for booksellers and libraries.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Farmers' Institutes

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rwitt_2000" <rwitt_2000@...> wrote:

In Wisconsin where I spent my early years, the University of Wisconsin,
also a land grant university, created county extensions. This is where
farmers obtained information about farming. Each county had one and the
county agent would travel to farms and schools spreading the knowledge
of "modern" agriculture. Wisconsin has a strong "progressive tradition"
so people expected the government to provide such services. I don't
recall railroads being involved. Maybe family run dairy farms with the
milk mostly consumed locally and in Milwaukee and Chicago milk markets,
it didn't create much potential railroad freight traffic as say "cash
crops" such as grains and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Bob Witt

There are a couple photos of Soo Line "agricultural display" trains in
North Dakota floating around, one even includes a flatcar with a
display of modern chicken coops :-)

I think chartering a train to serve the public was pretty much gone by
the depression, improved roads and easier travel made it easier for
the county extension agents to go directly to the farmers.

Dennis


Re: Soo Line boxcar questions

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, timboconnor@... wrote:


I can't read the reweigh either, and many of Jim Sands' photos date
from 1966, but I have seen several cases where Jim himself clearly
misdated his scans. For one thing, he sometimes returned to an old
slide and rescanned it, and gave it a new date. So don't take Jim's
scan dates as gospel.

Tim O'Connor

OK, you got me interested, so I opened the image in Photoshop. It
looks like the last reweigh was 11 - 63, based on the fact that the
stencil bars are symmetrical on both the top and bottom of the second
digit, and the only number this is normally true for is 3. That means
the 1960 caption date is clearly wrong, and the 1966 one could be
correct. So if the original poster feels like stretching it to a 1936
car and doing a real bang-up weathering job, I'm not going to argue.
The newer stenciling for the reporting marks is kinda cool anyway.

Dennis


Re: Farmers' Institutes

rwitt_2000
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "wmcclark1980" <walterclark@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Baker" bakert@ wrote:


I have been looking back in company magazines from the Chicago Great
Western during the Twenties. I noticed several references to
"farmers' institutes". The CGW even had an old coach converted to an
"instruction car," I believe. The purpose of the "institutes" was to
instruct farmers along the line on scientific methods of farming.
Somewhere I read an article about similar institutes along the Great
Northern Railway during the Twenties. I assume that other railroads
operating in the Midwest and on the Great Plains had similar programs.

Farms were smaller then, and very few were corporate operations,
such as one sees today. Does anyone on the list know how long the
railroads followed such a policy? In any case, such programs suggest
a symbiosis between the railroad and the locales it served unknown
today and unknown for quite some time.

Any information out there?

Thanks for any help.

Tom


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Tom,

In the book "Sunset Limited, The Southern Pacific Railroad and the
Development of the American West 1850 - 1930" by Richard J. Orsi,
published in 2005 by the University of California Press, there's a
whole chapter about the efforts of the SP to help local farmers in
from 1908 - 1912. They ran a farm demonstration train co-sponsored by
the SP and the University of California College of Agriculture.
Similar joint railroad-land grant college/university programs ran
through the West, mid-West and South in the first few decades of the
20th century.

The book debunks a great deal of the myth surrounding the SP and is a
great read (at least I enjoyed it).

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA
In Wisconsin where I spent my early years, the University of Wisconsin,
also a land grant university, created county extensions. This is where
farmers obtained information about farming. Each county had one and the
county agent would travel to farms and schools spreading the knowledge
of "modern" agriculture. Wisconsin has a strong "progressive tradition"
so people expected the government to provide such services. I don't
recall railroads being involved. Maybe family run dairy farms with the
milk mostly consumed locally and in Milwaukee and Chicago milk markets,
it didn't create much potential railroad freight traffic as say "cash
crops" such as grains and fresh fruits and vegetables.

Bob Witt


Re: New Tahoe Truck

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:


Walter Clark wrote:
Now, still on SP, boxcars and trucks, which is, in your opinion, the
best of the available Bettendorf T-section 50 ton trucks? I'm afraid
to count how many kits I have that need those.
Please keep in mind that other foundries made T-section trucks,
not exactly matching the Bettendorf version. Prominent among them for
SP modelers is the Columbia Steel version.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
Tony,

I know I'm beginning to sound like a broken record, but just how
different were the Bettendorf and Columbia Steel versions of the
T-Section truck, and which model, in your opinion, most closely
matches the Columbia Steel version?

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA


Re: Farmers' Institutes

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Baker" <bakert@...> wrote:


I have been looking back in company magazines from the Chicago Great
Western during the Twenties. I noticed several references to
"farmers' institutes". The CGW even had an old coach converted to an
"instruction car," I believe. The purpose of the "institutes" was to
instruct farmers along the line on scientific methods of farming.
Somewhere I read an article about similar institutes along the Great
Northern Railway during the Twenties. I assume that other railroads
operating in the Midwest and on the Great Plains had similar programs.

Farms were smaller then, and very few were corporate operations,
such as one sees today. Does anyone on the list know how long the
railroads followed such a policy? In any case, such programs suggest
a symbiosis between the railroad and the locales it served unknown
today and unknown for quite some time.

Any information out there?

Thanks for any help.

Tom


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Tom,

In the book "Sunset Limited, The Southern Pacific Railroad and the
Development of the American West 1850 - 1930" by Richard J. Orsi,
published in 2005 by the University of California Press, there's a
whole chapter about the efforts of the SP to help local farmers in
from 1908 - 1912. They ran a farm demonstration train co-sponsored by
the SP and the University of California College of Agriculture.
Similar joint railroad-land grant college/university programs ran
through the West, mid-West and South in the first few decades of the
20th century.

The book debunks a great deal of the myth surrounding the SP and is a
great read (at least I enjoyed it).

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA


Re: New Tahoe Truck

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Walter Clark wrote:
Now, still on SP, boxcars and trucks, which is, in your opinion, the best of the available Bettendorf T-section 50 ton trucks? I'm afraid to count how many kits I have that need those.
Please keep in mind that other foundries made T-section trucks, not exactly matching the Bettendorf version. Prominent among them for SP modelers is the Columbia Steel version.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: New Tahoe Truck

rwitt_2000
 

"Brian Leppert wrote:

The newest HO freight car truck from Tahoe Model Works is what much
of the hobby still calls a "bettendorf". I'm calling it a "Buckeye
A.R.A. 50-ton Truck". The real sideframe I measured and photographed
was made by the Buckeye Steel Casting Co. and included a spring plank
and four coil springs per sideframe grouped close together.

This sideframe is illustrated in Buckeye's ads in the 1928 and 1931
Car Builder Cyclopedias and pictured in Mainline Modeler May and July
2001 and May 1986 issues under C&O 8000-9499 series and Pere
Marquette 82000-83499 series 1930 built steel boxcars.
Can anyone post a scan of the Buckeye ad from the Car Builders Cyc?

Bob Witt


Re: pulp & paper

Don Worthy
 

Russ, I can speak about the clay. I've lived and worked in the clay business my whole life. My dad started in 1946 with (at that time) "Southern Clays" which became Freeport Kaolin. During my time Freeport was bought by Engelhard (evil empire).
In the mid 50s they were still experimenting with shipping "slurry". You might see a tank car ever now and then. In 1959 the Freeport research lab did come up with a process to get the solids up (and still get it out) so tank car shipments could be made. (There is a lot more to that issue)
But real tank car shipping for clay did not get going til later in 1960.
The biggest shipping was still done in box cars with bagged clay or bulk. Even in early 1980s, many customers were still ordering bulk clay in box cars.
As a car cleaner, we had to clean the in coming cars then put 2"X12" boards in the box cars that were to be bulk loaded. The boards were put either across the door ways (whole car is one bin) or across the car at the door ways, which creates a "bin" on each end of the car with the doorway still clear. This would be for two different grades of clay.
 
Many companies were still not set up to receive bulk loaded clay in covered hoppers during the late 70s and early 80s. Things changed quickly, although, during this time.
The use of box cars for bulk loading changed so quickly during the early 80s.
Any way, there is much more but, for your time frame there would be boxcars with bagged and bulk loads with a few two and three bay covered hoppers in the mix.
Hope that helps
Don Worthy
Ivey, Ga.

--- On Mon, 6/30/08, Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re:pulp & paper
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, June 30, 2008, 10:42 AM






Malcolm,
If your talking about baled market pulp not pulp wood the ratio is 1:1.
That is what I had in mind. Although the weight is 1:1 plus a small fraction, wouldn't the cube of the finished product be less. I had the impression that woodpulp might be less dense than the paper. Would 50 tons of woodpulp fit in 40 ft. car ?

Actually the paper would weigh a bit more due to additives (starch, gum arabic,etc.. ) and whether it's coated or not.
I think we'll have some tank cars of clay slurry coming in. Was it shipped as slurry in 1955, or should it come in the powder form in covered hoppers ? And We'll have the occasional tank car of other materials.

If the car is clean enough to haul pulp bales it's clean enough to haul paper rolls (which are wrapped with heavy brown kraft paper).
Russ Hass
============ ========

Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: Farmers' Institutes

Thomas Baker
 

I have been looking back in company magazines from the Chicago Great Western during the Twenties. I noticed several references to "farmers' institutes". The CGW even had an old coach converted to an "instruction car," I believe. The purpose of the "institutes" was to instruct farmers along the line on scientific methods of farming. Somewhere I read an article about similar institutes along the Great Northern Railway during the Twenties. I assume that other railroads operating in the Midwest and on the Great Plains had similar programs.

Farms were smaller then, and very few were corporate operations, such as one sees today. Does anyone on the list know how long the railroads followed such a policy? In any case, such programs suggest a symbiosis between the railroad and the locales it served unknown today and unknown for quite some time.

Any information out there?

Thanks for any help.

Tom


Re: New Tahoe Truck

Tim O'Connor
 

The trucks I bought from Brian came with .088 wheels. Does
Brian sell them w/o wheelsets?

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "John Golden" <golden1014@yahoo.com>
Hi Brian,

Thanks for continuing to bring out much-needed products.

I'd like to offer one suggestion for you, Sir: Many of us have
invested heavily in "P87" Reboxx replacement wheelsets. As you
develop the Buckeye truck and the AAR self-aligning, spring-
plankless double-truss truck (and perhaps others to replace the
Accurail ARA truck truck down the road), I strongly suggest that you
tool them to accept the same Reboxx axle length with the trucks
they're designed to replace/upgrade.

I, for example, have about 80 models equipped with Accurail trucks
with the correct Reboxx axle lengths. I wouldn't drop everything to
buy replacement trucks if I had to re-equip them with new wheelsets
too.

Thanks!
John


Re: Soo Line boxcar questions

Tim O'Connor
 

I can't read the reweigh either, and many of Jim Sands' photos date
from 1966, but I have seen several cases where Jim himself clearly
misdated his scans. For one thing, he sometimes returned to an old
slide and rescanned it, and gave it a new date. So don't take Jim's
scan dates as gospel.

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu>

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/soo/soo44052ajs.jpg
Dennis,
The photo is caption with a 1966 date. I can't read the reweigh, but
if it agrees, then that half of the equation is complete


Re: NYC Milk Car 6460

rdietrichson
 

Ed,
While the car shown in the ebay photos may have carried milk, the car was actually an Express reefer and occaisionaly showed up on the Fast Mail in ATSF territory.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington. NC

----- Original Message -----
From: armand
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 11:40 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: NYC Milk Car 6460


Marty and group,The NYC and Rutland milk cars were essentially the same
car,with some minor refinements.Since the Rutland was under NYC 's control
many of the same designs were used including,locomotives ,rolling stock and
buildings.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@cox.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 8:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NYC Milk Car 6460

Ed,

Years ago someone (F&C - or molded by F&C for someone else) did a
resin kit for the NYC cars you're referring to. I have no idea if
they're still available. I never built one, but remember Andy
Sperandeo had one and was underwhelmed by the quality of the kit in
general.

I noticed in the last Naperville flyer I received from Martin Lofton
that Sunshine's 2009 model year would include a milk car - I can't
remember the entire description (it was very brief) but I do know it
mentioned a "CV" milkcar. I can't find the flyer (we've just
moved) -- but I do know the way it was described (Rutland/CV
milkcar????) it sounded to me like a typo and it should have been
Rutland/NYC milkcar. Which, of course, would make sense and could
very well be the car you're looking for.

I'll look for the flyer this week - but perhaps someone else has a
copy a little closer to hand.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Edward Sommer <ejsommer@...> wrote:
>
> Group,
> I asked this question on the PCL when this was posted there and
did receive a couple of responses. I know there are a couple of NYC
experts on this list so I'll ask again: does anyone know if there
is an HO model of this milk car. I ask because these cars show up
in the consist lists of the book "Ghost Trains of the SP", the book
on the Overland mail trains and I would like to have one of these
cars for my train.
> TIA,
> Ed Sommer
> San Jose, CA
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----
> From: rwitt_2000 <rwitt_2000@...>
> To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
> Sent: Saturday, June 28, 2008 12:03:24 PM
> Subject: [STMFC] NYC Milk Car 6460
>
> This item was recently placed on ebay.
>
> PICTURES OF NYC MILK CAR 6460, SIDE AND END VIEW AND A SMALL
BLUEPRINT,
> MEASURES APPROX 8 X 12.", A B & W PHOTO
>
> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
ViewItem&item=180258556675&ssPageNa&#92;
> &#92;
> me=ADME:B:SS:US:1123
> <http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
ViewItem&item=180258556675&ssPageN&#92;
> ame=ADME:B:SS:US:1123>
>
> Bob Witt
>
> I also posted this on the Passenger Car List
>
>
>

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

--
Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.15.10/1091 - Release Date: 10/24/07
2:31 PM


Re: NYC Milk Car 6460

armprem
 

Marty and group,The NYC and Rutland milk cars were essentially the same
car,with some minor refinements.Since the Rutland was under NYC 's control
many of the same designs were used including,locomotives ,rolling stock and
buildings.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@cox.net>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, June 30, 2008 8:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NYC Milk Car 6460


Ed,

Years ago someone (F&C - or molded by F&C for someone else) did a
resin kit for the NYC cars you're referring to. I have no idea if
they're still available. I never built one, but remember Andy
Sperandeo had one and was underwhelmed by the quality of the kit in
general.

I noticed in the last Naperville flyer I received from Martin Lofton
that Sunshine's 2009 model year would include a milk car - I can't
remember the entire description (it was very brief) but I do know it
mentioned a "CV" milkcar. I can't find the flyer (we've just
moved) -- but I do know the way it was described (Rutland/CV
milkcar????) it sounded to me like a typo and it should have been
Rutland/NYC milkcar. Which, of course, would make sense and could
very well be the car you're looking for.

I'll look for the flyer this week - but perhaps someone else has a
copy a little closer to hand.



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Edward Sommer <ejsommer@...> wrote:

Group,
I asked this question on the PCL when this was posted there and
did receive a couple of responses. I know there are a couple of NYC
experts on this list so I'll ask again: does anyone know if there
is an HO model of this milk car. I ask because these cars show up
in the consist lists of the book "Ghost Trains of the SP", the book
on the Overland mail trains and I would like to have one of these
cars for my train.
TIA,
Ed Sommer
San Jose, CA



----- Original Message ----
From: rwitt_2000 <rwitt_2000@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, June 28, 2008 12:03:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] NYC Milk Car 6460

This item was recently placed on ebay.

PICTURES OF NYC MILK CAR 6460, SIDE AND END VIEW AND A SMALL
BLUEPRINT,
MEASURES APPROX 8 X 12.", A B & W PHOTO

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
ViewItem&item=180258556675&ssPageNa&#92;
&#92;
me=ADME:B:SS:US:1123
<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?
ViewItem&item=180258556675&ssPageN&#92;
ame=ADME:B:SS:US:1123>

Bob Witt

I also posted this on the Passenger Car List




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





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Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.5.516 / Virus Database: 269.15.10/1091 - Release Date: 10/24/07
2:31 PM


Re: New Tahoe Truck

golden1014
 

Hi Brian,

Thanks for continuing to bring out much-needed products.

I'd like to offer one suggestion for you, Sir: Many of us have
invested heavily in "P87" Reboxx replacement wheelsets. As you
develop the Buckeye truck and the AAR self-aligning, spring-
plankless double-truss truck (and perhaps others to replace the
Accurail ARA truck truck down the road), I strongly suggest that you
tool them to accept the same Reboxx axle length with the trucks
they're designed to replace/upgrade.

I, for example, have about 80 models equipped with Accurail trucks
with the correct Reboxx axle lengths. I wouldn't drop everything to
buy replacement trucks if I had to re-equip them with new wheelsets
too.

Thanks!
John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry" <jrs060@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@> wrote:
The newest HO freight car truck from Tahoe Model Works is what
much
of the hobby still calls a "bettendorf". I'm calling it
a "Buckeye
A.R.A. 50-ton Truck". The real sideframe I measured and
photographed
was made by the Buckeye Steel Casting Co. and included a spring
plank
and four coil springs per sideframe grouped close together.

This sideframe is illustrated in Buckeye's ads in the 1928 and
1931
Car Builder Cyclopedias and pictured in Mainline Modeler May and
July
2001 and May 1986 issues under C&O 8000-9499 series and Pere
Marquette 82000-83499 series 1930 built steel boxcars.

It will be available for sale in just a few weeks. I'll post
more
information then.

I hope to have the next project, an AAR self-aligning, spring-
plankless double-truss truck finished by the end of this year.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

115901 - 115920 of 189675