Date   

Re: New Tahoe Truck

Walter M. Clark
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Walter Clark1980 wrote:
To summarize (if my spreadsheet got everything),
Bettendorf T-section 26,165
ASF T-section 10,764
Columbia Steel T-section 1,253
Symington T-section 100
Tennessee CI&R T-section 500
I gather this doesn't include the gondolas and stock cars in my
Volume 1, nor (of course) the hoppers and tank cars from my
not-quite-yet-issued Volume 5 on those car types. But I think the trend
in numbers is not going to change much.
There is the further problem, Walter, that these designs evolved
with time. For example, compare pages 72 and 94 in my Volume 1 on SP
gondolas and stock cars--and this is just Bettendorf. The _Car Builder
Cyc_ volumes are helpful, but not every design of every manufacturer
was pictured in them, even if you have a complete set available for
examination at a local archive. For more details, additional pictorial
info was in the ads in _Railway Age_ and in _Railway Mechanical
Engineer_ among other journals.
In my opinion it is not useful to ask (or try to answer) "which
model truck comes closest" unless you have an exact prototype with
which to compare. Some modelers, of course, will be content with
anything which looks like a T-section <g>--obviously I'm not referring
to Walter Clark in that comment.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
That's right, Tony. I want all the errors in my models to be there
because I didn't execute something correctly, not because I made the
wrong choice in some part.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA


Re: GN1152 - type 11 tank car

Rich Yoder
 

Ok Guys,
You have me confused.
Is it a 12,000 gallon type 11 car built by ACF?
Or something else?

Sincerely, Rich Yoder
7 Edgedale Court
Wyomissing PA 19610-1913
610-678-2834 after 6:00PM est until 10:00PM
www.richyodermodels.com

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Brian Leppert
Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 12:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: GN1152 - type 11 tank car

Last Wednesday I wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@...> wrote:

Rob,
It's from GN series X1125-X1164, built by PSC, 1913. 12,000 gallons.
This info from Great Northern Railway Historical Society's Reference
Sheet
No. 211.
I screwed up. The Reference Sheet states ACF, not PSC.

Sorry,
Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: ADMIN: Bridges Terminated

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Tony Thompson says:

"What makes sense to me is to restrict any bridge discussions to
their applicability to freight car design."

Yes. The termination is with regard to stand alone bridge discussion. Discussion about "bridge" designs used in frt cat construction, just as discussion regarding the advantages of wood vs steel, various brake systems or end designs in frt car design is within scope.

"BTW, Mike, I bet those conductors CROSSED plenty of bridges,
without which their runs would have been WAY shorter . . . <g>

True enough...but luckily for you...my frt conductor book covers Laramie to Green River. Had it covered only Sherman Hill...it would not be true. Nary a true bridge in sight...much to my chagrin <G>. Bridges are neat things...just not on a frt car group.

Mike Brock


Painting & Weathering Detail Castings with Dave Revelia DVD Ready for Pre-Order

smason22000 <smason2@...>
 

Good afternoon folks,

I've begun taking orders on my latest DVD, "Painting and Weathering Detail Castings with
Dave Revelia".

This 60-minute DVD covers Dave's award-winning techniques on several types of castings
including barrels, trash cans, wooden shelving, workbenches, tin roofing and more. If
you've had the opportunity to see Dave's work in person, you know what an incredible
modeler he is. Dave demonstrates his techniques, and also shows you the many non-
model railroad-related products that he incorporates into his modeling.

The DVD also includes a bonus feature, "How They Did That". In it, Dave demonstrates his
technique for creating a cobblestone road.

The DVD is $29.95 plus $3.00 domestic postage, and $6.00 international postage. I expect
them to ship on August 1st.

As always, you can order direct through my website, or send a check or money order
made out to me at:

9 Lee Street
Franklin, MA 02038

Thanks,

Scott Mason

www.scottymason.com


Re: ADMIN: Bridges Terminated

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mike Brock wrote:
OTOH, after looking through my frt conductor's book for 1949, I'm yet to find a bridge in any of the 35 frt trains listed.
What makes sense to me is to restrict any bridge discussions to their applicability to freight car design. What we just had was a thread about how bridges themselves are built, clearly off topic, but Jim Sabol is right that not ALL bridge-related material should be out of bounds.
BTW, Mike, I bet those conductors CROSSED plenty of bridges, without which their runs would have been WAY shorter . . . <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ADMIN: Bridges Terminated

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Jim Sabol writes:

"I
don't mean this to sound smarty pants, but it just sems good to
remind ourselves that the framing inside the walls of both freight
cars, passenger cars, and hood unit diesels do in fact follow bridge
engineering principles."

True enough. OTOH, after looking through my frt conductor's book for 1949, I'm yet to find a bridge in any of the 35 frt trains listed.

Mike Brock


Re: ADMIN: Bridges Terminated

Jim Sabol
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Given that bridges are not frt cars, discussions about bridges are
now
terminated.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner
Mike and all: Granted that bridges are not freight cars, but I
guarantee you that freight cars are bridges inasmuch as their sides
and underframes must support both dead and live loads between the
bolsters, analagous to a land bridge's piers. Freight car sides are
sometimes Howe truss (many Milwaukee single-sheathed cars) and
sometimes Pratt truss (many Great Northern single-sheathed cars) and
sometimes plate girder (steel sides). Even the great John Allen "had"
to admit chagrin when a scratch built car side he had begun turned
out "wrong" because he forgot which was Pratt and which was Howe. I
don't mean this to sound smarty pants, but it just sems good to
remind ourselves that the framing inside the walls of both freight
cars, passenger cars, and hood unit diesels do in fact follow bridge
engineering principles. Thank you for listening. Jim here.


Re: L&N Old reliable Decals

lnnrr <lnnrr@...>
 

Brian, the set of "The Old Reliable" I use is from Curt Fortenberry.
He's listed on the Great Decals website and his e-mail is
arrphoto at alaska dot net.
His set SE-2A has 6 TOR slogans priced at $3.00.
Chuck Peck

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian J Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

I'm looking for an old reliable decal set of L&N boxcars. Has anyone
used
Champ HB-173? Is the old reliable slogan well done. I have the other
data, I
am most interested in the slogan. Any other leads?

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


sheet......I screwed up

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@...> wrote:

Last Wednesday I wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@> wrote:

Rob,
It's from GN series X1125-X1164, built by PSC, 1913. 12,000
gallons.
This info from Great Northern Railway Historical Society's
Reference
Sheet
No. 211.
I screwed up. The Reference Sheet states ACF, not PSC.
bull sheet


Re: GN1152 - type 11 tank car

Brian Leppert <b.leppert@...>
 

Last Wednesday I wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@...> wrote:

Rob,
It's from GN series X1125-X1164, built by PSC, 1913. 12,000 gallons.
This info from Great Northern Railway Historical Society's Reference
Sheet
No. 211.
I screwed up. The Reference Sheet states ACF, not PSC.

Sorry,
Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: pulp & paper - and clay

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

I know this is out of era, but it relates to Don Worthy's comments about clay shipment. I thought some might be interested to know that in New England today there is exactly one railroad customer with its own siding that receives bagged clay. Gare Ceramics in Rosemount gets about one carload per month.


Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: paper density

Tim O'Connor
 

Malcolm

You should check with club members before making such assumptions.
The whole point of the pulp-->paper mill is that it produces fine quality,
coated papers. A kraft mill or newsprint mill would be far larger, consume
vast quantities of sulfuric acid and other chemicals, and would not receive
pulp but would receive vast amounts of pulpwood and wood chips.

The mill is located on the Southern railway, and the C&LE only brings
inbound loads of pulp from New England in 40 ft box cars. The Southern
brings in kaolin and takes out the finished products.

Tim O'

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>

I'm going to assume that we're shipping kraft paper in rolls that can tolerate
the same grade of car as the inbound pulp. After making an allowance for
interior damage, bad orders, imbalance of input an out put, etc., I'm going to
assume I can reload 75 % of the inbound cars.


Re: refrigerator car hatches

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Marty (not signing his full name) wrote:
Hi group: I not that some refrigerator cars moved with the hatches partially opened. I understand that some produce needed to be ventilateded (cool) but not frozen and some were heated in winter to prevent freezing. But what were the actual regulations contolling hatch opening?
Shipper could choose--there were no "regulations," though there was a tariff which specified charges for various services. This is explained further in the PFE book.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: pulp & paper

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

I think we've covered the box car side pretty well. But what about tank cars. I'm supposing there are some used in the pulp to paper process that would arrive in tank cars. What is known about that ?

Malcolm Laughlin, Editor 617-489-4383
New England Rail Shipper Directories
19 Holden Road, Belmont, MA 02478


Re: paper density

Malcolm Laughlin <mlaughlinnyc@...>
 

Thanks Don and Russ for the input. From their density information and other stuff that I've found, it looks like 50 tons of paper would reuquire a box car of about 5555 cubic feet - much more than any car of the 50's. Can someone tell me what were the typical inside dimensions of 40 ft' box cars of that period.

Also what are typical heights and diameters of paper rolls. Would around 3'3" diameter and four foot height be in the ball park. For 50#/cu ft paper in rolls 3'4" in diameter in a 10 by 40 ID car, (30 rolls) it would take 63" high rolls to get 50 tons in a car. But that assumes the rolls are exactly the right size to be loaded the full width and length of the car. That four foot roll would allow only 38 tons in a car.

As for pulp, given a floor area of 400 ft. and a low density pulp at 25#, 50 tons would be only five feet high.

This leads me to the conclusion that if we assume a 1:1 tonnage ratio of paper to pulp, we're sure to need more cars outbound than inbound, perhaps a 5:4 ratio.

I'm going to assume that we're shipping kraft paper in rolls that can tolerate the same grade of car as the inbound pulp. After making an allowance for interior damage, bad orders, imbalance of input an out put, etc., I'm going to assume I can reload 75 % of the inbound cars.

So for each ten carloads of paper shipped, I'll have eight carloads of pulp arriving, two pulp cars leaving empty and four clean cars supplied by the railroad.

I'm assuming that kaolin, starch and other such stuff will have enough of a dust problem that those cars will need to go the cleaning track before being loaded again.


ADMIN: Bridges Terminated

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Given that bridges are not frt cars, discussions about bridges are now terminated.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: grab irons: bending jig

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Bill Bedford's site offers a lot of neat stuff. His "miscellaneaous"
page has what appear to be very nice etched brake wheels in many sizes.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Manfred Lorenz" <germanfred55@...> wrote:

Resurrecting an old thread:

Here's another supplier of more railroad connected tools who offers a
bending jig for hand holds that should be more versatile:

http://www.mousa.uk.com/Cat/OLCat4/jigs_and_tools.html

At £2.50 (pound sterling) it should be quite affordable.

At my place here it opens slowly and the pictures take a while
to "develop".

Manfred


Re: Steel truss bridge at Odgen UT

Tim O'Connor
 

Mike
I think Overland did a similar bridge in HO scale.
Tim O'

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: MIKE CALVERT <mike.calvert@...>
For an excellent model of this type of bridge, but with an arched top chord, see
the River Raisin site at
http://www.riverraisinmodels.com/pratt.html
Mike Calvert


kit availability

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

To all - Please be aware that we will not be filling orders for series 11400, 11500 and 11600 until August. We will have only a limited ability to fill orders for older kits. Data disks and decals are not affected. - Al Westerfield


Re: paper density

water.kresse@...
 

Did they have to keep the "clay dry bulk hops" in a pool to avoid contamination?

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "rhass" <rhass@...>
Malcom,
It depends on what kind of paper your mill is making.
Tissue 12-25# cu ft
Fine paper 48# cu ft
Kraft paper 54# cu ft
Coated book paper 69# cu ft
Glassine 86# cu ft

Add the variables of dia. and length of the rolls being shipped and how they'll fit into a boxcar (shipped on end so the rolls won't get a flat spot) and the car ratio can be all over the place. Tissue is the exception it would be converted on site.

Pulp bales are 32"x24"x20" and weigh about 400# (50# cu ft) so a little math will give you how many tons per car.

I'll second what Don said about clay loading and add that the starch wouldn't have been bulk loaded in a boxcar, think lots of bags.

Russ Hass

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