Date   

Re: ADMIN: Re: Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958

water.kresse@...
 

We were referring to commercial shipments [size not weight] on railroad flat car(s) moved on or before Sept 1958.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "Mike Brock" <brockm@...>
Frank Valoczy writes:

"2 questions back: 1, does that 'biggest' have to have been something in
the US? 2, does a railway gun count?"

"If the answers are NO and YES respectively... maybe this:

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854 - this is a 1/35
model of the monster..."

Actually, this: STMFC rules state:

"The objectives
include the sharing of
information about North American, standard gauge railroad freight cars
including their operation,..."

Subjects other than those of North American railroad frt cars are entirely
out of scope. Therefore, discussions associated with
the subject, "Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958"
that involve non North American railroads are out of scope and are not
permitted to be presented on the STMFC.

Thanks
Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Crates in Gondolas - loading restraints

Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@...>
 

Many thanks Elden, just the sort of info I was after.

The pics I've been able to find/see of gons laden with crates tend to be
consist pics or yard-wide shots like
:http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/shot%20of%20mo/shotofmomar03.ht
ml - the group of crate-laden gondolas roughly in the centre of that pic
is what I'm looking to recreate (well.. actually, I'd love to be able to
recreate the whole scene in HO ^_^ ) but obviously my models will be
viewed at a slightly closer distance and I'd like to be able to get the
packing detail right too!

Might one also assume that such packing/blocking/chocking would have
been left in the car when it was unloaded, so presumably it would be a
common sight to see such debris in the bottom of an empty gondola??

regards,
Alan,
London, UK

-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: 22 July 2008 11:49



Alan;

They were commonly placed on crosswise 4 by 6's (or similar) so
one could get
cables or chains under the load, and then blocked with stacks of
wood blocks
nailed together in as high a stack as necessary to secure the
load from
lateral or endwise movement. The AAR loading rules go into much
detail on
how to secure each type of load. If the crates were tall, or had
a high
center of gravity, they would put pieces of wood up the ends and
put
diagonals up against them to prevent it from tipping.
Steel-floored gons had
to have cribbing installed since you couldn't nail the blocks to
the floor,
and were much more complicated to secure many loads in. This was
why some
railroads did not have a lot of steel-floored gons, even though
they were
probably more durable. Some shippers insisted on wood floors.

Elden Gatwood

________________________________

On Tuesday, July 22, 2008 I asked:

When crates were loaded into gons, how was the load restrained
from
sliding along or across the gon?? Ropes? Chains? Chocks/blocks??


I've got a couple of gons which I want to load with crates, but
I've yet
to find a pic looking down into one so loaded.

Cheers,
Alan,
London, UK



.

<http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=2554753/grpspId=1705169725/m
sgId=74405/stime=1216723755/nc1=4430620/nc2=3848627/nc3=4025291>



********************************************************************
The contents of the e-mail and any transmitted files are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Transport for London hereby exclude any warranty and any liability as to the quality or accuracy of the contents of this email and any attached transmitted files. If you are not the intended recipient be advised that you have received this email in error and that any use, dissemination, forwarding, printing or copying of this email is strictly prohibited., If you have received this email in error please notify postmaster@...., This email has been sent from Transport for London, or from one of the companies within its control within the meaning of Part V of the Local Government and Housing Act 1989. Further details about TfL and its subsidiary companies can be found at http://www.tfl.gov.uk/ourcompany, This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the presence of computer viruses.
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ADMIN: Re: Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Frank Valoczy writes:

"2 questions back: 1, does that 'biggest' have to have been something in
the US? 2, does a railway gun count?"

"If the answers are NO and YES respectively... maybe this:

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854 - this is a 1/35
model of the monster..."

Actually, this: STMFC rules state:

"The objectives
include the sharing of
information about North American, standard gauge railroad freight cars
including their operation,..."

Subjects other than those of North American railroad frt cars are entirely out of scope. Therefore, discussions associated with
the subject, "Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958" that involve non North American railroads are out of scope and are not permitted to be presented on the STMFC.

Thanks
Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Tank car question

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Frank Voloczy asked:
http://galerija.railserbia.net/details.php?image_id=793
<<snip>>
"...I'm wondering if anyone knows of a model that could be used to
model these cars?"

Bruce Smith replied:
"There is an HO scale model of this car produced by Klein Modellbahn
of Austria that might be a starting point for a decently detailed
model."

Here's a direct link to the model:
http://www.kleinmb.at/kmb3609.htm

Another possible approach is the one used by Mark Feddersen as
detailed in "Tank Car Pleasure: Twin dome kit modifications" in the
July 1988 issue of Mainline Modeler. Even though the articles are
twenty years old, the two Feddersen tank car articles (MM October
1985, July 1988) and the one written by Jeff English (MM June 1988)
deserve a second look, as they are especially creative solutions for
building tank car models for prototypes that are not covered by any
kits.


Ben Hom


Re: Tank car question

Bruce Smith
 

On Jul 21, 2008, at 11:36 PM, destron@... wrote:

Hopefully this is enough within the scope of this list to be okay... it
*is* steam era, and it *is* railway, and it *is* American... made.

http://galerija.railserbia.net/details.php?image_id=793

On the photo visible in the link above is an American-made tank car that
ended up with the Yugoslavian Railways; the one above was taken in
Belgrade (Serbia) but I've personally seen one in Ljubljana (Slovenia) on
a storage track at the railway museum at Ljubljana-Siska, and what I'm
pretty sure was one of these cars at the Doboj yards in Bosnia.

Technical and other information I can get from the Serbian and Croatian
railway forums, but I'm wondering if anyone knows of a model that could be
used to model these cars?

Thanks.

Frank Valoczy
Frank,

We have talked about these tank cars a number of times here on this list. This is, as you note, a US built tank car. Most likely built for use in WWII. It is s SINGLE compartment tank with 2 domes (note the lack of any rivets for tank bulkheads). Only one dome has a hatch. This construction allowed enough expansion space while maintaining the tighter european clearances.

There is an HO scale model of this car produced by Klein Modellbahn of Austria that might be a starting point for a decently detailed model.
http://www.kleinmb.at/homepage.htm

In our last discussion of this car, it was noted that at least one car was likely used in the US on the C&O however this would be an incredibly rare car on US rails ;^)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Alan;



They were commonly placed on crosswise 4 by 6's (or similar) so one could get
cables or chains under the load, and then blocked with stacks of wood blocks
nailed together in as high a stack as necessary to secure the load from
lateral or endwise movement. The AAR loading rules go into much detail on
how to secure each type of load. If the crates were tall, or had a high
center of gravity, they would put pieces of wood up the ends and put
diagonals up against them to prevent it from tipping. Steel-floored gons had
to have cribbing installed since you couldn't nail the blocks to the floor,
and were much more complicated to secure many loads in. This was why some
railroads did not have a lot of steel-floored gons, even though they were
probably more durable. Some shippers insisted on wood floors.



Elden Gatwood



________________________________

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Monk
Alan
Sent: Tuesday, July 22, 2008 5:31 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May
1958



Hmmm... strictly speaking, it's not a single *load* though.

When broken down into it's constituent parts, it required something like
5 or 6 separate trains to move Dora from place to place (plus a train
for the security battalion, a train for the flak batallion, a train for
the engineers....)

When set up in the firing location, it sat on a pair of curved parallel
tracks and was moved up and down by a pair of specialist low-geared
diesel locos.

I am tempted by the 1:35 kit though... and I've seen a website for a
scratchbuilt one-SIXTH scale model too.

(IMHO largest 'rail mounted' load would be a complete Saturn V on the
'railroad' linking the VAB and the pad ^_^ )


Onto more list-relevant matters :)

When crates were loaded into gons, how was the load restrained from
sliding along or across the gon?? Ropes? Chains? Chocks/blocks??

I've got a couple of gons which I want to load with crates, but I've yet
to find a pic looking down into one so loaded.

Cheers,
Alan,
London, UK

-----Original Message-----
From: destron@... <mailto:destron%40vcn.bc.ca>
Sent: 22 July 2008 05:20
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . .
. up to May 1958




2 questions back: 1, does that 'biggest' have to have been
something in
the US? 2, does a railway gun count?

If the answers are NO and YES respectively... maybe this:

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854>
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854> > - this is a
1/35
model of the monster...

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10845
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10845>
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10845
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10845> > - a ww2 era
photo
of the prototype...

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10849&t=1
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10849&t=1>
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10849&t=1
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10849&t=1> > - a shell
for
the thing, next to a T-34 tank...

Crazy Russians... :D

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Folks,

This is a loaded question. It is is relation to a C&O Chessie
NEWS
article from May 30, 1958. It deals with a very large atomic
reactor
movement via river barge up the Tennessee River to the C&O at
Muncie,
Indiana, up to Grand Rapids, Michigan, and finally over to the
Enrico
Fermi plant site 30 miles south of Detroit. Biggest appears to
be
defined as a "height [22'above top of rails]and width [14' 6
1/2"]
combo" definition. We are NOT talking about long Butane Tanks
that are
almost three flat cars long. The weight was only 91 tons.

Do you have one bigger than the C&O's PR guy's for this time
frame? . . . if so, please related. There were water turbine
wheel
assemblies that appeared to have gone down between the rails
in special
to meet height requirements.

I'm leaving this question and running off on vacation for some
time, so
no real rush.

Thanks,

Al Kresse

.

<http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=2554753/grpspId=1705169725/m
<http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=2554753/grpspId=1705169725/m>
sgId=74400/stime=1216700385/nc1=4430620/nc2=3848627/nc3=5028924>


********************************************************************
The contents of the e-mail and any transmitted files are confidential and
intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are
addressed. Transport for London hereby exclude any warranty and any liability
as to the quality or accuracy of the contents of this email and any attached
transmitted files. If you are not the intended recipient be advised that you
have received this email in error and that any use, dissemination,
forwarding, printing or copying of this email is strictly prohibited., If you
have received this email in error please notify postmaster@...
<mailto:postmaster%40tfl.gov.uk> ., This email has been sent from Transport
for London, or from one of the companies within its control within the
meaning of Part V of the Local Government and Housing Act 1989. Further
details about TfL and its subsidiary companies can be found at
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/ourcompany, <http://www.tfl.gov.uk/ourcompany,> This
footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the
presence of computer viruses.
********************************************************************


Re: Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958

Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@...>
 

Hmmm... strictly speaking, it's not a single *load* though.

When broken down into it's constituent parts, it required something like
5 or 6 separate trains to move Dora from place to place (plus a train
for the security battalion, a train for the flak batallion, a train for
the engineers....)

When set up in the firing location, it sat on a pair of curved parallel
tracks and was moved up and down by a pair of specialist low-geared
diesel locos.

I am tempted by the 1:35 kit though... and I've seen a website for a
scratchbuilt one-SIXTH scale model too.

(IMHO largest 'rail mounted' load would be a complete Saturn V on the
'railroad' linking the VAB and the pad ^_^ )


Onto more list-relevant matters :)

When crates were loaded into gons, how was the load restrained from
sliding along or across the gon?? Ropes? Chains? Chocks/blocks??

I've got a couple of gons which I want to load with crates, but I've yet
to find a pic looking down into one so loaded.

Cheers,
Alan,
London, UK

-----Original Message-----
From: destron@...
Sent: 22 July 2008 05:20
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . .
. up to May 1958




2 questions back: 1, does that 'biggest' have to have been
something in
the US? 2, does a railway gun count?

If the answers are NO and YES respectively... maybe this:

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854> - this is a
1/35
model of the monster...

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10845
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10845> - a ww2 era
photo
of the prototype...

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10849&t=1
<http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10849&t=1> - a shell
for
the thing, next to a T-34 tank...

Crazy Russians... :D

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

> Folks,
>
> This is a loaded question. It is is relation to a C&O Chessie
NEWS
> article from May 30, 1958. It deals with a very large atomic
reactor
> movement via river barge up the Tennessee River to the C&O at
Muncie,
> Indiana, up to Grand Rapids, Michigan, and finally over to the
Enrico
> Fermi plant site 30 miles south of Detroit. Biggest appears to
be
> defined as a "height [22'above top of rails]and width [14' 6
1/2"]
> combo" definition. We are NOT talking about long Butane Tanks
that are
> almost three flat cars long. The weight was only 91 tons.
>
> Do you have one bigger than the C&O's PR guy's for this time
> frame? . . . if so, please related. There were water turbine
wheel
> assemblies that appeared to have gone down between the rails
in special
> to meet height requirements.
>
> I'm leaving this question and running off on vacation for some
time, so
> no real rush.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Al Kresse


.

<http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=2554753/grpspId=1705169725/m
sgId=74400/stime=1216700385/nc1=4430620/nc2=3848627/nc3=5028924>



********************************************************************
The contents of the e-mail and any transmitted files are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Transport for London hereby exclude any warranty and any liability as to the quality or accuracy of the contents of this email and any attached transmitted files. If you are not the intended recipient be advised that you have received this email in error and that any use, dissemination, forwarding, printing or copying of this email is strictly prohibited., If you have received this email in error please notify postmaster@...., This email has been sent from Transport for London, or from one of the companies within its control within the meaning of Part V of the Local Government and Housing Act 1989. Further details about TfL and its subsidiary companies can be found at http://www.tfl.gov.uk/ourcompany, This footnote also confirms that this email message has been swept for the presence of computer viruses.
********************************************************************


Re: New Tahoe Truck

tmolsen@...
 

Sorry Guys,

This was to be off list and I forgot to put Brian's email address in the address line.

Regards,

Tom Olsen
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479


Re: New Tahoe Truck

tmolsen@...
 

Hi Brian,

Please send me a copy of the flyer for the new Buckeye truck so that I can make a decision as to whether I need it and if so how many.

Best Regards,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...


Tank car question

destron@...
 

Hopefully this is enough within the scope of this list to be okay... it
*is* steam era, and it *is* railway, and it *is* American... made.

http://galerija.railserbia.net/details.php?image_id=793

On the photo visible in the link above is an American-made tank car that
ended up with the Yugoslavian Railways; the one above was taken in
Belgrade (Serbia) but I've personally seen one in Ljubljana (Slovenia) on
a storage track at the railway museum at Ljubljana-Siska, and what I'm
pretty sure was one of these cars at the Doboj yards in Bosnia.

Technical and other information I can get from the Serbian and Croatian
railway forums, but I'm wondering if anyone knows of a model that could be
used to model these cars?

Thanks.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

-----
http://hydrorail.hostwq.net/index.html - Rails along the Fraser
http://hydrorail.rrpicturearchives.net/ - Rail Photos


Re: Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958

destron@...
 

2 questions back: 1, does that 'biggest' have to have been something in
the US? 2, does a railway gun count?

If the answers are NO and YES respectively... maybe this:

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10854 - this is a 1/35
model of the monster...

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10845 - a ww2 era photo
of the prototype...

http://railserbia.net/forum/download/file.php?id=10849&t=1 - a shell for
the thing, next to a T-34 tank...

Crazy Russians... :D

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Folks,

This is a loaded question. It is is relation to a C&O Chessie NEWS
article from May 30, 1958. It deals with a very large atomic reactor
movement via river barge up the Tennessee River to the C&O at Muncie,
Indiana, up to Grand Rapids, Michigan, and finally over to the Enrico
Fermi plant site 30 miles south of Detroit. Biggest appears to be
defined as a "height [22'above top of rails]and width [14' 6 1/2"]
combo" definition. We are NOT talking about long Butane Tanks that are
almost three flat cars long. The weight was only 91 tons.

Do you have one bigger than the C&O's PR guy's for this time
frame? . . . if so, please related. There were water turbine wheel
assemblies that appeared to have gone down between the rails in special
to meet height requirements.

I'm leaving this question and running off on vacation for some time, so
no real rush.

Thanks,

Al Kresse


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




!DSPAM:1291,48852d62227567810472257!

-----
http://hydrorail.hostwq.net/index.html - Rails along the Fraser
http://hydrorail.rrpicturearchives.net/ - Rail Photos


Re: Loading Box Shook

Lee Thwaits <leethwaits@...>
 

In the far distant past ( about 1953, 54) I worked a couple of summers in a packing house (pears, not citrus) and helped unload some carloads of box shook. The box cars were loaded to the top of the doors and tight up against the doors. As I recall it was quite hard to get the doors open because the shook was so tight against the doors. The box making machines were in the basement and the shook was moved to the basement down a chute.

Lee Thwaits


Biggest thing ever transported by rail? . . . up to May 1958

al.kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

Folks,

This is a loaded question. It is is relation to a C&O Chessie NEWS
article from May 30, 1958. It deals with a very large atomic reactor
movement via river barge up the Tennessee River to the C&O at Muncie,
Indiana, up to Grand Rapids, Michigan, and finally over to the Enrico
Fermi plant site 30 miles south of Detroit. Biggest appears to be
defined as a "height [22'above top of rails]and width [14' 6 1/2"]
combo" definition. We are NOT talking about long Butane Tanks that are
almost three flat cars long. The weight was only 91 tons.

Do you have one bigger than the C&O's PR guy's for this time
frame? . . . if so, please related. There were water turbine wheel
assemblies that appeared to have gone down between the rails in special
to meet height requirements.

I'm leaving this question and running off on vacation for some time, so
no real rush.

Thanks,

Al Kresse


Re: Spray booth

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Brian,
I just replaced my worn out Badger unit from many years ago with a
Paasche unit.
http://www.paascheairbrush.com/booths_hssb.html
I'm very pleased with the results. I've been using it now for about 4
weeks and am wishing I'd done this years ago. The exhaust motor is
quite powerful, yet reasonably quiet.
I purchased the unit through this guy,
http://airbrush-outlet.stores.yahoo.net/index.html
Good prices and quick delivery. Buy extra filters while you're at it.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian J Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

I am in the market for a paint booth for my airbrushing endeavors. I'm
looking for any recommendations and pointers before I buy one.
Thanks.
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: New Tahoe Truck

Brian Leppert <b.leppert@...>
 

Armand,

I don't know why, but I'm pretty computer ignorant. If you give me a mailing address, I'll snail-mail it to you.

Brian
Tahoe Model Works

----- Original Message -----
From: "Armand Premo" <armprem@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2008 1:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Tahoe Truck


Brian,Have a problem.Even though my computer has Microsoft Word,I can't open
it.Armand
----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2008 12:01 PM
Subject: [STMFC] New Tahoe Truck


A flyer for Tahoe Model Works's newest offering, an HO scale "Buckeye
A.R.A 50-Ton Truck" is now available. Anyone wishing an e-mailed
copy, please contact me off list at b.leppert@.... Your computer
will need Microsoft Word.

For those who have bought direct from me before or are on my mailing
list, the flyer is in the mail.

There's one embarressing correction that needs to be made. The flyer
states that this truck was made from "the late 1930s until the late
1940s". That should have said "late 1920s". And as the side
frame has the molded-on end of an ARA design truck bolster, without a
centered vertical web, I'm pretty sure the 1940s claim is incorrect.
The sideframe I measured and photographed was cast in 1949, however.

These trucks with regular RP-25 metal wheelsets are now ready for
shipping. Trucks with "semi-scale" wheelsets will be available by the
end of this week, hopefully.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Internal Virus Database is out of date.
Checked by AVG.
Version: 8.0.100 / Virus Database: 269.24.0/1462 - Release Date: 5/23/2008
7:20 AM


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Spray booth

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

I am in the market for a paint booth for my airbrushing endeavors. I'm
looking for any recommendations and pointers before I buy one.
Thanks.
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Lima NYC/NISX stock car model

Charlie Vlk
 

Richard-
As the thread wandered from the specific Lima N Scale car, I thought I would add some information about the nearest prototype to
the Lima car. I am not defending a car that has been resized to fit a common underframe (in fact, in my role as a consultant have
recommended to Hornby that none of the Lima freight cars are worth refurbishing except as mold bases for new inserts).
The SM-19Cs were an extension of the SM-19A (composite ends) and SM-19B (improved Dreadnaught ends) classes which were 40 ft cars
.... and, while technically beyond the dates of this list, of some interest in that the cars were built as an extension of steam era car types so
late in the game and were constructed as 50 footers with only a change in subclass and not class as would be expected.
Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2008 2:56 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Lima NYC/NISX stock car model


On Jul 21, 2008, at 11:27 AM, Charlie Vlk wrote:

> The CB&Q SM-19C cars were built by Havelock Shops in Nov and Dec of
> 1962. They have
> Stanray Diagonal Panel Roofs and 4/5 Improved Dreadnaught ends. The
> N Scale Lima car
> has the same arrangement of truss and slats as the Q car but the
> roof and ends are incorrect.
> Charlie Vlk
>
> No, no, and no. The models don't accurately represent any prototype
> stock cars, as far as I can tell; for one thing, stock cars had
> long since ceased to be built new before the late style Dreadnaught
> ends were introduced. North American did not use NISX reporting
> marks, nor did they lease stock cars to the NYC, during the steam/
> transition era. And green paint? Whose idea was that?
>

> Richard Hendrickson
>

What's your point, Charlie? Is this intended as a defense of Lima's
toy stock car, the only problems with which are that it was 45' long,
had the wrong ends and roof, and was painted dark green? In any
case, why are you citing the Q's SM-19C class, since it was built
well beyond the cutoff date for this list.

Richard Hendrickson






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Re: Loading Box Shook

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 7/21/08 8:29:17 AM, railsnw@... writes:


Anybody have the size of a lug box?
I measured one of my pear boxes. It is Length 24", width 15" and height
9". All the local canner's and growers used this size box in Santa Clara
Valley.

eric


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Re: New Tahoe Truck

armprem
 

Brian,Have a problem.Even though my computer has Microsoft Word,I can't open it.Armand

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, July 21, 2008 12:01 PM
Subject: [STMFC] New Tahoe Truck


A flyer for Tahoe Model Works's newest offering, an HO scale "Buckeye
A.R.A 50-Ton Truck" is now available. Anyone wishing an e-mailed
copy, please contact me off list at b.leppert@.... Your computer
will need Microsoft Word.

For those who have bought direct from me before or are on my mailing
list, the flyer is in the mail.

There's one embarressing correction that needs to be made. The flyer
states that this truck was made from "the late 1930s until the late
1940s". That should have said "late 1920s". And as the side
frame has the molded-on end of an ARA design truck bolster, without a
centered vertical web, I'm pretty sure the 1940s claim is incorrect.
The sideframe I measured and photographed was cast in 1949, however.

These trucks with regular RP-25 metal wheelsets are now ready for
shipping. Trucks with "semi-scale" wheelsets will be available by the
end of this week, hopefully.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


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Re: Athearn Wood sheathed reefer

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ben Hom wrote:
There isn't a prototype that matches this model exactly. It's closest to PFE Class R-40-24, originally rebuilt from older cars in 1948 with Improved Dreadnaught ends . . . Therefore, (with the exception of the wide steel side sills, which are incorrect for this prototype), the Athearn model represents these cars post-1955. See Thompson/Church/Jones' _Pacific Fruit Express_ for more information.
Ben's summary is fine. I covered the Athearn conversion in my modeling article in RMC, March 1987. Another shortcoming of the Athearn model relative to PFE is that the sheathing retaining angle is too high up on the car side. But given all the other problems with the Athearn body, including the door being too short, this is really a small nit.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

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