Date   

Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Tim O'Connor
 

Scott

From what I understand, custom photo etched parts are only slightly
more expensive than custom decals. If you did the artwork for the etch
you might be able to run off 100 sets and sell enough to pay for your
own needs....

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: sseders@comcast.net

In lieu of that, I wish somone would offer photo etched replacement ends we
could add grab irons to. Unfortunately, there probably would not a very
extensive market for it.

Scott Seders


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

mcindoefalls
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Nelson" <Lake_Muskoka@...> wrote:

$30 for a flatcar?
Hey, it's ready to run and has a *real wood* deck! But seriously, the
Red Caboose SP flat was pretty pricey, too, although one might think
the tooling costs would be somewhat less than for a house car or hopper.

Walt Lankenau


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Dave Nelson
 

Looks like a nice model. I do have to express considerable surprise at a
$30 price for 1 flatcar (n.b., I'm into V-Scale ("Virtual" Scale computer
simulators) where I can buy 25 unique, highly detailed GP-7 or 9 locomotives
for only $18). I know the argument about play time vs. assembly time, but
$30 for a flatcar?

Dave Nelson


Re: Mineral Service on your Roads

David Smith
 

There's a wealth of information in the USGS MInerals Yearbook - there's
current info online at http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/myb.html, but
large libraries should have back issues from years of interest.

There was lots of iron ore coming out of the Adirondacks on the D&H
(Mineville, Lyon Mountain, etc.) in the steam era. Much of it went into
local steel mills, often in small ore cars, but some went to more distant
sources, mostly in underfilled hoppers. There was a large iron mine in SE
PA (Grace Mine for Beth Steel). Much of this ore would be black and sandy
in texture

Also coming out of the Adirondacks on D&H after the early 40s was ilmenite
(titanium-iron ore) for paint pigment, etc. also black and sandy-textured.
It trashed the paint on the cars it was loaded in because it was loaded hot
right out of the sintering plant. Cars were maybe half-full when fully
loaded.

Transportation is a huge part of the cost of mineral materials, so
industries would always prefer to use more local sources.



On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 1:36 PM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <
elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil> wrote:

Folks;

I have been doing a bunch more reading on minerals shipped by the
railroads,
and figure you could have an interest. This may create a more interesting
through or set-out operation for you, or even an on-line industrial
interchange with your road, if we can figure out what cars were used by
what
roads, in this service.

We have pretty good ideas of what roads shipped coal, and iron ore, but
there
is a lot that can be done to ID some of the rest, some of which was shipped
in open hoppers, others in covered hoppers, and even box cars. Mineral
service was a huge amount of the traffic on most roads, even those you
wouldn't think of, so I hope we can figure some of this out.

Here we go:

Aluminum; source area usually overseas (Guinea, Jamaica, Brazil, India);
would have entered U.S. ports, most eastern.

QUESTIONS: What ports, and shipped by what roads, where destined, how
shipped? How much?

Ammonium Sulfate; by-product of coking industry; used as soil amendment,
white to yellow powder, shipped most often bagged, in box cars. Sources:
Coke Industry - Bethlehem Steel, Colorado Fuel & Iron, Crucible Steel,
Detroit Steel, Eastern Gas & Fuel, Ford Motor Co., Granite City Steel,
Inland
Steel, Interlake Iron, International Harvester, Jones & Laughlin, Kaiser
Steel, Merritt-Chapman & Scott-Tennessee Products & Chemical, National
Steel,
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical, Pittsburgh Steel, Republic Steel, Sharon Steel,
U.S. Pipe & Foundry, U.S. Steel (numerous locations), Wheeling Steel,
Woodward Iron, Youngstown Sheet & Tube (to start) If you want more details
about any of these facilities' production rates or locations, ask!

Questions: Where did all this bagged product go first, before it went to
local feed & fertilizer distributors?

Calcium Carbide: grayish-white mineral used in de-sulphurization of iron.
Also used in deoxidization at the ladle, in treatment.

QUESTIONS: Sources? Shipped by what roads? Are these the cylindrical tanks
we have seen shipped on the NYC and RI in dedicated service rack flats? How
much of this was shipped?

Chromium: blue-white ore; by 1952, 40% was coming from Turkey, 38% South
Africa, some from s. Egypt & Cuba (i.e., 79% import), with small amounts
from
Montana, California, Oregon, and Alabama. Used in ferrochromium production.
Most coming through ports of Philadelphia, Baltimore (others??). Shipped
most often in open twin hoppers not filled to volumetric capacity due to
weight. Most headed to specialty steel-making facilities (and small
industrial chromium coating concerns, but first through where?)

QUESTIONS: What other ports, and shipped by what roads? How much?

More minerals, later! Any input appreciated.

Elden Gatwood






--
David L. Smith
Da Vinci Science Center
Allentown, PA
http://www.davinci-center.org

Please consider the environment before printing this email.

Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But since no one was
listening, everything must be said again. -- Andre Gide


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Scott Seders
 

I'm sure many modelers would like a really good PS-3 two bay hopper. The
only one out there is the ancient Trains Miniature tooling.

If only Athearn had acquired the Stewart models -- then we'd get a bunch of
radically improved hoppers with wire grabs instead of fat plastic grabs.

Tim O'Connor
You have got that right Tim. I model B&O and WM and would still be doing a Snoopy dance if only that would have happened.

In lieu of that, I wish somone would offer photo etched replacement ends we could add grab irons to. Unfortunately, there probably would not a very extensive market for it.

Scott Seders


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 14, 2008, at 5:43 AM, David North wrote:

Richard or others, did Santa Fe have other classes of this car,
please?

No. The 200 Ft-V class cars were the Santa Fe's only AAR 70 ton flat
cars, and those were actually war emergency cars delivered in 1944
(though the difference between the recommended practice and war
emergency designs isn't an issue for modelers, since it was just the
replacement of metal floor stringers with wood). After the war, the
Santa Fe went to cast steel flat cars with GSC one-piece castings
(classes Ft-W, Ft-3, Ft-5, etc.).


Richard Hendrickson


Re: Mineral Service on your Roads

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Bob;



That is interesting. Do you know where CoG sent their cars? Were there any
specific concerns that went to CoG specifically for their kaolin? Was it
used at all in glass-making, too?



Thanks,



Elden Gatwood



________________________________

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bob
McCarthy
Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2008 2:18 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Mineral Service on your Roads



Howdy!

Lately, I have been building and lettering a string of Central of
Georgia two and three bay covered hoppers. They were used in Kaolin service
that has many uses in both the paper (coating), fine china/ceramics, and
medicine (Kaopectate), etc.

Since most of the members of this site are in HO, I can tell you that
the Central of Georgia Historical Society, Allen Tuten, President, Google it
and you can ask for Micro- scalle decals for these cars.

Bob McCarthy

--- On Tue, 10/14/08, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil
<mailto:elden.j.gatwood%40usace.army.mil> > wrote:

From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil
<mailto:elden.j.gatwood%40usace.army.mil> >
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Mineral Service on your Roads
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, October 14, 2008, 5:36 PM

Folks;

I have been doing a bunch more reading on minerals shipped by the railroads,
and figure you could have an interest. This may create a more interesting
through or set-out operation for you, or even an on-line industrial
interchange with your road, if we can figure out what cars were used by what
roads, in this service.

We have pretty good ideas of what roads shipped coal, and iron ore, but there
is a lot that can be done to ID some of the rest, some of which was shipped
in open hoppers, others in covered hoppers, and even box cars. Mineral
service was a huge amount of the traffic on most roads, even those you
wouldn't think of, so I hope we can figure some of this out.

Here we go:

Aluminum; source area usually overseas (Guinea, Jamaica, Brazil, India);
would have entered U.S. ports, most eastern.

QUESTIONS: What ports, and shipped by what roads, where destined, how
shipped? How much?

Ammonium Sulfate; by-product of coking industry; used as soil amendment,
white to yellow powder, shipped most often bagged, in box cars. Sources:
Coke Industry - Bethlehem Steel, Colorado Fuel & Iron, Crucible Steel,
Detroit Steel, Eastern Gas & Fuel, Ford Motor Co., Granite City Steel, Inland
Steel, Interlake Iron, International Harvester, Jones & Laughlin, Kaiser
Steel, Merritt-Chapman & Scott-Tennessee Products & Chemical, National Steel,
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical, Pittsburgh Steel, Republic Steel, Sharon Steel,
U.S. Pipe & Foundry, U.S. Steel (numerous locations), Wheeling Steel,
Woodward Iron, Youngstown Sheet & Tube (to start) If you want more details
about any of these facilities' production rates or locations, ask!

Questions: Where did all this bagged product go first, before it went to
local feed & fertilizer distributors?

Calcium Carbide: grayish-white mineral used in de-sulphurization of iron.
Also used in deoxidization at the ladle, in treatment.

QUESTIONS: Sources? Shipped by what roads? Are these the cylindrical tanks
we have seen shipped on the NYC and RI in dedicated service rack flats? How
much of this was shipped?

Chromium: blue-white ore; by 1952, 40% was coming from Turkey, 38% South
Africa, some from s. Egypt & Cuba (i.e., 79% import), with small amounts from
Montana, California, Oregon, and Alabama. Used in ferrochromium production.
Most coming through ports of Philadelphia, Baltimore (others??). Shipped
most often in open twin hoppers not filled to volumetric capacity due to
weight. Most headed to specialty steel-making facilities (and small
industrial chromium coating concerns, but first through where?)

QUESTIONS: What other ports, and shipped by what roads? How much?

More minerals, later! Any input appreciated.

Elden Gatwood


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 14, 2008, at 8:50 AM, tgregmrtn@aol.com wrote:

Richard,

If I am not mistaken the bolster and supports were visible on?top
of the deck as well, making the decking itself "fit" around the
exposed members, correct? Whereas the 50-ton car has the deck
sheathing continuous without interuption.






Correct. I didn't mention it because Ed Hawkins had already pointed
it out.


Richard, as we have discussed, this is an important car that has
been missing from the plastic offerings.





Agreed. It's was the only AAR recommended-practice/war emergency
design that hadn't already been modeled in styrene.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Mineral Service on your Roads

Bob McCarthy
 

Howdy!
 
     Lately, I have been building and lettering a string of Central of Georgia two and three bay covered hoppers.  They were used in Kaolin service that has many uses in both the paper (coating), fine china/ceramics, and medicine (Kaopectate), etc.
 
     Since most of the members of this site are in HO, I can tell you that the Central of Georgia Historical Society, Allen Tuten, President, Google it and you can ask for Micro- scalle decals for these cars.
 
Bob McCarthy

--- On Tue, 10/14/08, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil> wrote:

From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Mineral Service on your Roads
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, October 14, 2008, 5:36 PM






Folks;

I have been doing a bunch more reading on minerals shipped by the railroads,
and figure you could have an interest. This may create a more interesting
through or set-out operation for you, or even an on-line industrial
interchange with your road, if we can figure out what cars were used by what
roads, in this service.

We have pretty good ideas of what roads shipped coal, and iron ore, but there
is a lot that can be done to ID some of the rest, some of which was shipped
in open hoppers, others in covered hoppers, and even box cars. Mineral
service was a huge amount of the traffic on most roads, even those you
wouldn't think of, so I hope we can figure some of this out.

Here we go:

Aluminum; source area usually overseas (Guinea, Jamaica, Brazil, India);
would have entered U.S. ports, most eastern.

QUESTIONS: What ports, and shipped by what roads, where destined, how
shipped? How much?

Ammonium Sulfate; by-product of coking industry; used as soil amendment,
white to yellow powder, shipped most often bagged, in box cars. Sources:
Coke Industry - Bethlehem Steel, Colorado Fuel & Iron, Crucible Steel,
Detroit Steel, Eastern Gas & Fuel, Ford Motor Co., Granite City Steel, Inland
Steel, Interlake Iron, International Harvester, Jones & Laughlin, Kaiser
Steel, Merritt-Chapman & Scott-Tennessee Products & Chemical, National Steel,
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical, Pittsburgh Steel, Republic Steel, Sharon Steel,
U.S. Pipe & Foundry, U.S. Steel (numerous locations), Wheeling Steel,
Woodward Iron, Youngstown Sheet & Tube (to start) If you want more details
about any of these facilities' production rates or locations, ask!

Questions: Where did all this bagged product go first, before it went to
local feed & fertilizer distributors?

Calcium Carbide: grayish-white mineral used in de-sulphurization of iron.
Also used in deoxidization at the ladle, in treatment.

QUESTIONS: Sources? Shipped by what roads? Are these the cylindrical tanks
we have seen shipped on the NYC and RI in dedicated service rack flats? How
much of this was shipped?

Chromium: blue-white ore; by 1952, 40% was coming from Turkey, 38% South
Africa, some from s. Egypt & Cuba (i.e., 79% import), with small amounts from
Montana, California, Oregon, and Alabama. Used in ferrochromium production.
Most coming through ports of Philadelphia, Baltimore (others??). Shipped
most often in open twin hoppers not filled to volumetric capacity due to
weight. Most headed to specialty steel-making facilities (and small
industrial chromium coating concerns, but first through where?)

QUESTIONS: What other ports, and shipped by what roads? How much?

More minerals, later! Any input appreciated.

Elden Gatwood

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Paint Failure on Outside Metal Roofs

Charlie Duckworth <trduck@...>
 

I've been finishing up many of my builds with oil paints on the roof
for weathering. I'll mix up a medium grey from black & white and paint
an irregular line by the roof caps to denote where paint flaked off -
not unlike how the military modelers do with WWII wings where the
panels were chipped or walked on. Since it's oil and dries slowly you
can then blend different parts so you get a variation in grays. On the
cars with wooden roofs I'll spray rail brown as an undercoat and then
spray the final color over it. When dry take an Exacto No 11 and
scrape off the top color where the brown shows through on individual
boards. I just did a B&O M15e last night I went over the roof and car
sides and it really helped age the car.

Charlie


Re: Mineral Service on your Roads

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Folks;



I have been doing a bunch more reading on minerals shipped by the railroads,
and figure you could have an interest. This may create a more interesting
through or set-out operation for you, or even an on-line industrial
interchange with your road, if we can figure out what cars were used by what
roads, in this service.



We have pretty good ideas of what roads shipped coal, and iron ore, but there
is a lot that can be done to ID some of the rest, some of which was shipped
in open hoppers, others in covered hoppers, and even box cars. Mineral
service was a huge amount of the traffic on most roads, even those you
wouldn't think of, so I hope we can figure some of this out.



Here we go:



Aluminum; source area usually overseas (Guinea, Jamaica, Brazil, India);
would have entered U.S. ports, most eastern.



QUESTIONS: What ports, and shipped by what roads, where destined, how
shipped? How much?



Ammonium Sulfate; by-product of coking industry; used as soil amendment,
white to yellow powder, shipped most often bagged, in box cars. Sources:
Coke Industry - Bethlehem Steel, Colorado Fuel & Iron, Crucible Steel,
Detroit Steel, Eastern Gas & Fuel, Ford Motor Co., Granite City Steel, Inland
Steel, Interlake Iron, International Harvester, Jones & Laughlin, Kaiser
Steel, Merritt-Chapman & Scott-Tennessee Products & Chemical, National Steel,
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical, Pittsburgh Steel, Republic Steel, Sharon Steel,
U.S. Pipe & Foundry, U.S. Steel (numerous locations), Wheeling Steel,
Woodward Iron, Youngstown Sheet & Tube (to start) If you want more details
about any of these facilities' production rates or locations, ask!



Questions: Where did all this bagged product go first, before it went to
local feed & fertilizer distributors?



Calcium Carbide: grayish-white mineral used in de-sulphurization of iron.
Also used in deoxidization at the ladle, in treatment.



QUESTIONS: Sources? Shipped by what roads? Are these the cylindrical tanks
we have seen shipped on the NYC and RI in dedicated service rack flats? How
much of this was shipped?



Chromium: blue-white ore; by 1952, 40% was coming from Turkey, 38% South
Africa, some from s. Egypt & Cuba (i.e., 79% import), with small amounts from
Montana, California, Oregon, and Alabama. Used in ferrochromium production.
Most coming through ports of Philadelphia, Baltimore (others??). Shipped
most often in open twin hoppers not filled to volumetric capacity due to
weight. Most headed to specialty steel-making facilities (and small
industrial chromium coating concerns, but first through where?)



QUESTIONS: What other ports, and shipped by what roads? How much?





More minerals, later! Any input appreciated.



Elden Gatwood


New Item! Tsunami Diesel Decoders in the AT100 Format (Light Board Replacement)

brasshat99
 

New Item! Tsunami Diesel Decoders in the AT100 Format

Tsunami Diesel TSU -AT1000 1 Amp Plug & Play Decoders
The long awaited TSU-AT1000 has arrived! These are
designed to replace the light board installed in many of
today's DCC-Ready locomotives. Each TSU-AT1000 includes
up to 16 airhorns built into each model with no need for
additional software or special programmers. Diesel versions
include such effects as Diesel Exhaust, Engine Start-up,
Engine Shut-down, Bell, Airhorns, Radiator Fans, Compressor,
Dynamic Brakes, Brake Squeal, Coupler Clank and more!
The TSU-AT1000 features the same great 16 bit sound found
in the Tsunami with the simplicity of a Plug & Play decoder.
A few new features on the TSU-AT1000 are a 1.5 volt
regulator for mini-bulbs as well as 4 lighting outputs.

Six versions will be available to ship within the next 2 weeks:
Part # 828040- EMD 567 (1st Generation)
Part # 828041- EMD 645 (2nd Generation)
Part # 828042- EMD 710 (3rd Generation)
Part # 828043- ALCO 244 (V12)
Part # 828044- ALCO 251 (V12)
Part # 828045- ALCO 251 (V16)
Part # 828046- GE FDL-16
Part # 828047- Fairbanks-Morse

List price on these is $99.95. Our price will be $79.99 each, plus
shipping (and sales tax if you happen to live in Florida). Please
contact us at trolleysndollies@earthlink.net or you may call us at
(386) 428-1676 for further information and purchasing.
Tom Meyer
Trolleys N' Dollies
Edgewater, FL


Re: Paint Failure on Outside Metal Roofs

Bob McCarthy
 

Eldon,
 
     Having read your note on the heavily weathered PRR boxcar.  Having an art back- ground is nice, but not a requirement.  I have recently completed a Central of Georgia Boxcar. 
 
     First the boxcar was lettered.  Next, it was heavily weathered using washes of the basic car color.  That instantly ages the white lettering as if the white paint had washed off and/or faded.  That was followed by lightly sanding the car with 800 grit autobody sandpaper.  This wears lettering on high spots (rivet lines) providing further visual aging.  At this point a light coating of Dull Coat was added.  Then using Bragdon Enterprises (www.bragdonem.com) powdered colors, you can create many of the tones you discribed. 
 
     Tonight, I will photograph the car and send that image to you.  Hope this helps.
 
Bob McCarthy

--- On Tue, 10/14/08, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil> wrote:

From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Paint Failure on Outside Metal Roofs
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, October 14, 2008, 12:55 PM






Denny and all;

Faced with a large number of projects for which I had few answers, I have
been staring at in-service photos for months now trying to get up the courage
to finish some of these horrible weathering jobs off. I've done a few. A
number of them are really daunting.

Roofs are a big part of it. I have a lot of PRR cars to finish, and I think
I have some of their way of dealing with this issue partly figured out.

When the PRR was using plain-steel sheet for their lap-seamed roofs, they
seemed to have less paint flaking problems than when they went to galvanized
roofing (immediate post-war). This is not to say they did not have problem
with those roofs, they just laid on coats of asphaltum, if it leaked, but
otherwise, out of the shop, it was painted. The paint seems to have
gradually failed by erosion of its thickness and rust forming around seams
and rivet heads, again both of which could be temporarily cured by another
coat of asphaltum.

When they went to outside vendor galvanized roofing, with their big rebuild
campaigns, they created a whole different paint problem. The paint flaked
off the roofing, sometimes pretty quickly. The seam caps stayed painted
longer and gradually rusted up like the earlier sheeting. This created that
neat grey/silver sheeting and red/rust seam capping you see on so many cars,
not just PRR (I have photos of WAB, NKP, ATSF, NYC and others in front of
me). There are many subtleties in all this, when you look at a lot of
photos. The rivet heads along the side/roof juncture went to rust very
quickly, and are very visible on many of my photos as small brown dots.

This is also added to by the variations you seen in paint failure seen in
color shifting and rust bleed through. Earlier paints on the PRR seem to
have shifted toward orange and/or pinker versions of Freight Car Color, as
opposed to later versions, which shifted toward a bluish tan-brown or some
mess I haven't completely figured out.

Lastly, are these jobs where the paint has almost worn off. One X26 has me
in awe. The paint has almost completely worn off wood and steel
framing/ends/ doors. It is a fascinating patina of gunmetal blue with rust
blotches on the steel, and a suite of pinks, tans, browns and hints of
original red, on the wood. The lettering is almost gone. I do not currently
have the courage to finish that job!

It takes an artist to see how some of this should be created. I wish I had
taken more art classes!

Elden Gatwood

____________ _________ _________ __

From: STMFC@yahoogroups. com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Denny
Anspach
Sent: Saturday, October 11, 2008 12:50 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Paint Failure on Outside Metal Roofs

Getting ordinary paint to stick on galvanized metal is a common
problem that has never completely solved, as far as I know. The most
common means of minimizing paint failure has been to apply on the
clean galvanized surface a preliminary first coat of a weak acid, most
commonly ordinary household vinegar. Whether or not the car builders
routinely did that, i.e. cleaned the surface AND applied vinegar, I
know not (but probably someone does).

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Availabilty of Superior hand brakes castings ?

Bernd Schroeder
 

Hello list,

does anybody here have any information whether the castings for the
Superior hand brakes (that used to be available from the CNWHS as mentioned
in message 72129, but are not listed anymore on their website) can be
obtained somewhere, somehow ?


thanks

Bernd Schroeder

Adelsdorf, Germany


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Ed,
Thanks for the description. Now I know which car we are dealing with.
The Army had some out at Fort Bliss years ago and I was afforded plenty
of opportunity to examine them closely.

Unfortunately there do not appear to be any of these 70-ton flat cars
on the 48-49-50 Landmesser hot box list. Finding myself to be ever
less of a purist as vision diminishes and hand tremors increase, I'll
probably have to have a couple of these flats anyway.

Gene Green
OitwTtoEP


Re: HO USRA Gondola Decals Source?

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

I supplied the gondola artwork to Greg Komar (as well as that for
some other M&StL cars). The artwork was taken directly from the
General American stencil diagram for the M&StL's 30001 series all-
steel, drop-bottom gondolas that came along in the late 1940s.

Greg resized the gondola artwork to fit the Detail Associates all-
steel, drop-bottom gondola which, at that time, was probably the
closest one could come to the M&StL's 30001 series gondolas.

The key feature of the M&StL's lettering (on most revenue freight
cars) after 1937 was the slanted "The Peoria Gateway" slogan. I
don't know if any of the M&StL's original USRA composite gondolas
received the "The Peoria Gateway" slogan. The used USRA composite
gondolas did receive exactly that.

Gene Green
Out in the west Texas town of El Paso

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote:

I sent Edward a photo off list of a M&StL USRA Gon. They were
painted black. Greg Komar offers a dry transfer for an M&StL GS gon
that might be usable. HO-230; 30001-30499 GS
white black Sized to fit Detail Associates gondola

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Greg Martin
 

Richard,

If I am not mistaken the bolster and supports were visible on?top of the deck as well, making the decking itself "fit" around the exposed members, correct? Whereas the 50-ton car has the deck sheathing continuous without interuption.?

Richard, as we have discussed, this is an important?car that has been missing from the plastic offerings.

Greg Martin?

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, 13 Oct 2008 6:35 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar






On Oct 13, 2008, at 4:40 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Gene Green wrote:
How will the new Intermountain 70-ton flat car differ from the P2K
53'-6" flat car we already have?
Rich Orr replied:
P2K is a 50 ton car the IM is a 70 ton car.
True, but not helpful; and the underframe being a hair beefier is
pretty hard to see on a flat car. Should Intermountain actually tool a
70-ton truck, that would be a nice addition--but I'm not holding my
breath.
The AAR 50 ton and 70 ton flat cars were entirely different designs.
The 50 ton car was based on the Union Pacific F-50-11 class of 1941;
the 70 ton car was derived from a series of cars with notably low
decks built in the early 1940s for the Erie. As noted by Ed Hawkins,
the sides were different and, I will add, the 70 ton cars had 14
stake pockets while the 50 ton cars had 15 per side. The four road
names of IM's initial introduction are all authentic, and other RRs
that rostered AAR 70 ton flats included the Santa Fe, New York
Central, and Wabash, models of which will doubtless be coming from IM
in later production runs. About the trucks I can't say anything
until I see them.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: New HO scale 70-ton flatcar

Tim O'Connor
 

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Gatwood, Elden J SAD " <elden.j.gatwood@usace.army.mil>
So, when is someone going to do the alternate standard twin offset hopper?
Sigh... evidently no one. I was very disappointed that Kadee didn't do it.

Lastly, on the subject of flat cars, why hasn't Walthers re-done their GSC
"Commonwealth" car as a state-of-the-art car. No laughing, now...
I like the Walthers car. It is better than Tichy's version and can be easily
improved. And it has a separate deck. What's not to like? It would be nice
to have the longer versions built for several roads in the 1960's.

I'm sure many modelers would like a really good PS-3 two bay hopper. The
only one out there is the ancient Trains Miniature tooling.

If only Athearn had acquired the Stewart models -- then we'd get a bunch of
radically improved hoppers with wire grabs instead of fat plastic grabs.

Tim O'Connor


Re: True Scale HO sill steps

Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks Alan. I hope lots of scrap too -- mostly brass & stainless
steel. The material I like best for this sort of use is phosphor bronze.
If you've seen any of the Railyard kits then you've seen the wonderful
stuff that can be made from this material, including scale size angles,
channels and Z bar.

Tim O'Connor

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Monk Alan" <Alan.Monk@tube.tfl.gov.uk>
Tim,

here in the UK we have a number of suppliers of thin metal strip (brass,
steel, nickel silver, phosphor bronze) in various thicknesses and widths
for modelling - what sort of sizes are you after?? (The main supplier I
thinking of, Eileen's Emporuim, don't yet have a website, otherwise I'd
post a link).

In addition, I know I have lots of thin brass strip from waste sections
of etched brass kits, if I find something which might be useful I'd be
happy to post some over.

Regards,
Alan
London, UK

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor
Sent: 14 October 2008 13:31
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] True Scale HO sill steps



Walter M. Clark wrote

>> My current adventure<g> is modeling sill steps for Harriman
>> SP box cars.

Many of Al's kits use similar methods using flat brass 'wire'.
Personally I'd like to see someone do an etched sheet of strip
brass in several scale widths, each piece 3-4" long. It would
be generic material, thinner than the Detail Associates flat
strips, easier to bend and twist, for many applications. Easy
to cut too, because the cuts are not lengthwise -- as you said
it's really hard to cut shim material so narrowly.

Tim O'Connor


Re: USRA Standard 100-ton Gondola Car Design

water.kresse@...
 

Bob,

All three, the C&O/N&W/VGN, had rotary dumpers at Tidewater. It "appears" that the N&W/VGN had heavier tracks sooner than the C&O did and we don't know about the conditions of their branchline trackage. The C&O only purchased 1000 and then quickly retrenched back to 70-ton USRA clam-shell ctr and then ARA Offset-side Quad hops for use at either Toledo or Newport News. In between they had to put all new trucks on those 91-ton gons in 1925. The hopper cars would work in either the rotary dumpers or in the older NN high-pier direct dump into bunkers piers.

Other railroads had rotary dumpers. Railway companies tended to be very conservative and set in their ways . . . and liked to keep it simple.

Many of those B&O Quad Hops would eventually be reblt at the C&Os Raceland Car Shops in the late-60s.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: "rwitt_2000" <rwitt_2000@yahoo.com>
Al Kresse asked:

Why didn't "anyone" pursue that particular design? i.e. N&W, C&O and
then Virginian in their prototype or production 90-120-ton car
designs?
Al,

From what research I have completed on B&O coal cars, it appears
different railroads had different needs for the type of coal cars they
placed on their rosters. The B&O definitely settled upon the 50-ton
twin hopper as their "standard" coal cars. I don't have the memos to
document this, but this is implied from types of cars listed in their
rosters.

For what ever reasons the B&O had no interest in large capacity
gondolas. In fact, they had no interest in the USRA 50-ton twin hopper.
Although they received several thousands during the USRA era, they
immediately began building more of their class N-12 hopper at the
termination of USRA control even though the original design dated from
~1912. Large capacity cars for the B&O were the 70-ton ARA quad hoppers
received in the late 1920's.

Regards,

Bob Witt

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