Date   

Re: is this another new 70 ton truck?

Brian Leppert <b.leppert@...>
 

I think it is. However, ore cars typically have five foot wheel base trucks, instead of the normal 5'-8" for a 70 ton truck. 70 ton features on a short w.b. gives the proportions of a truck on steroids.

InterMountain's new truck under their new 2 bay covered hopper represents a 70 ton Barber S-2 with spring plank.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, November 02, 2008 5:00 PM
Subject: [STMFC] is this another new 70 ton truck?


http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-40501

Tim O'Connor


Re: 36' Fowler/Dominion cars and "almosts"...

Michael Aufderheide
 

--- On Tue, 11/4/08, destron@... <destron@...> wrote:


<CIL 2000-3600 (or were these the Monon SU cars?)The SU cars were different cars, the 8000 series, retired by the end of 1940.  The 36 ft howe truss cars were in three series due to rebuilding:Originally 2000-2899 blt Haskell & Barker 1912-14 (gone by 1942)
3149-3339 rebuilt from 2000 series 1927 (new ends) (gone by 1942)3400-3600 rebuilt from 2000 series  1927 (no reason why on diagram) (gone by 1949)
 Some were also converted to stock cars: 6200-6249.The boxcars are similar to the NC&StL 15100-16099  series (XM-17?)and there has been speculation that the Monon piggybacked an order with them.  The Monon cars are 1" shorter at 8'-0" and have a cu ft of  2482 built in 1912-14.  I don't know what the NC&StL build dates are for comparison.
Regards,Mike Aufderheide





















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 36' Fowler/Dominion cars and "almosts"...

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., destron@... wrote:

I've been poking around trying to compile a list of 36' "Fowler" cars...
I've gotten to a stage now where I've got a short list of definitely
Fowler/Dominion cars, and a longer list of possibles (of which I'm
sure a
number are actually DS cars, but can't tell that from the ORER info...)

SOO 12800-14298*
Correct.

Now, the others I'm not certain of, but tend to assume so based on
evidence of other Fowler series with the road (or with the parent/close
relative road):
DSS&A 11067-11569
DS wood underframe cars. The South Shore had no single sheathed cars
whatsoever.

SOO 28312+28456, 106600-107908, 108056-109908
28300-28498 (even) 30 ton DS wood automobile cars built by AC&F in 1910

106600-107908 (even) 30 ton DS boxcars built in 1905 - 06 for
Wisconsin Central and renumbered; can't find the builder without the
original WC numbers.

108056-109908 (even) 30 ton DS boxcar built in 1908 - 09 for WC.


Dennis


Re: 36' Fowler/Dominion cars and "almosts"...

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

M&StL 26000-26400
These were DS cars with TR underframes and at least 3 different ends.
There's a photo of one in an RP Cyc.
Clark Propst


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., "lnerj72" <lnerj72@...> asked:
what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions?
I liked to use white glue when I first started building wood models 30
years ago but I found that some model railroad paints (Floquil)
wouldn't cover the glue joints.

Prior to assembly I now seal wood with diluted Scalecoat sanding sealer
(without stiring in the pigment from the bottom) or diluted Ambroid
cement (MEK as thinner). Usually I sprayed both sides of the wood with
either of the coating solutions; in the beginning the wood will soak it
up like a sponge soaks up water. If you only coat one side it is apt to
curl up.

I like to use Ambroid cement for assembly. Some of the newer ones
mentioned might be as good or even better.

Don't spray car assembled with Ambroid cement with either of the
coatings mentioned above. The MEK will dissolve the glue joints.

Sealing the wood is important. I've seen wood sides shrink enought so
gaps between pieces can easily be seen. I had sides warp from decal
setting solution too.

In additions to the sealents mentioned above I successfully used a
waterborne sealent sold by Floquil, shellac, and a polyurethane wood
sealer - all for sealing wood. Don't mix them though. MEK redissolved
the polyurethane sealent ruining some wood parts.

Ed


Re: 36' Fowler/Dominion cars and "almosts"...

Mark P.
 

Frank,

Here's a photo of Erie 86554 to add to your collection. <http://replica.palni.edu/u?/winona,38> This was taken on the Winona [IN] Railroad in northern Indiana.

Mark Plank

----- Original Message -----


I've been poking around trying to compile a list of 36' "Fowler" cars...
<big snip>
Erie 86000-86999, 93000-93999*
--
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Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Ray Meyer
 

Whatever you use, sealing the wood before painting is absolutely necessary
for long term survival, especially in humid climates. Shellac is my
choice. My experience with sanding sealers is that the car in the end looks
like a plastic or resin car; my use of wood is to avoid that specifically.
[I'm of the "only wood looks like wood" persuasion. Yeah, I know many
others differ.]







--
Atty Raymond G. Meyer
110 E. Main St
Port Washington, WI 53074
262-284-5566
rgmeyer2@...


36' Fowler/Dominion cars and "almosts"...

destron@...
 

I've been poking around trying to compile a list of 36' "Fowler" cars...
I've gotten to a stage now where I've got a short list of definitely
Fowler/Dominion cars, and a longer list of possibles (of which I'm sure a
number are actually DS cars, but can't tell that from the ORER info...)

For the cars I'm sure are Fowlers or almost-those, the list is (* marks
those I've got photos for):

CN, various series
CP, various series

Algoma Central 3001-3020, 3051-3080
BAR 9000-9699*, 9800-10399
DW&P 400800-401549
Erie 86000-86999, 93000-93999*
Fc. Mexicano 8100-8199*
GTW 417500-420149*, 440300-440627
NC&StL 16100-16599*, 13500-15099, 15100-16099
NdeM 65700-65800*
New York, Susquehanna & Western 1500-1563*
Piedmont & Northern 12000-12074*
Quebec Central 3100-3198*
Quebec Rly, Light & Power 1016-1029, 1100-1109, 1110-1119
Roberval-Saguenay 536-537
SOO 12800-14298*
Sydney & Louisburg 102-115
TEM 80000-80098, 80100-80198, 80200-80398, 80400-80498*
TH&B 3000-3132, 4000-4301*
WM 28002-28003 (ex-Erie)

Now, the others I'm not certain of, but tend to assume so based on
evidence of other Fowler series with the road (or with the parent/close
relative road):

BAR 8100-8599, 8700-8799
CNJ 14000-14499 (drawing seems to suggest it)
CV 70731-71730, 71800-72049
DSS&A 11067-11569
NC&StL 24500-24599
SOO 28312+28456, 106600-107908, 108056-109908
M&StL 26000-26400
WAB 78000-78199 (read about these, are they 36' or 40'?)

And these are the "just guessing" that might well be DS cars or other
unrelated things:

Ala., Tenn. & Northern 15001-15150
Ann Arbor 69000-69286
B&M 12138-12258, 12301-12392, 64682-68247, 68317, 68333-68390
Belt Rly of Chicago 802-850, 852-862
C&EI 37002-37748, 635-699
Canton RR 400-420
CIL 2000-3600 (or were these the Monon SU cars?)
Clinchfield 3300-3833
Delaware & Northern 501-551
Detroit & Mackinac 2751
DMIR 5342-5390
FW&D 4400-5299
GM&O 43000-43299 (or were these SU cars?)
Kentucky & Tennessee 304-306
L&A 1851-1859
L&N 4000-5049, 5350-5549, 5050-5199, 5300-5349, 5550-5999, 6001-6999,
7000-7182, 7300-7499, 9000-9799
Lake Superior & Ishpeming 2026
Manistique & Lake Superior 50-52
Manufacturers Junction 1040-1049
Minnesota, Dakota & Western 3004-3005
Mississippi Central 4000-4109
MKTT 170000-170228
MN&S 2501-2510
Montana, Wyoming & Southern 326-569
NdeM 44000-44016, 13503-13515
NdeT 2010-3595
NKP 97000-97999
NYO&W 9201-9907
Reading 2000-3999, 14500-14999, 15700-15999, 17500-18479, 18500-18699
SN 2101-2105, 2249
SPdeM 8304-8820
Tremont & Gulf 476, 666, 674
Wyandotte Terminal 38, 80, 82, 84

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I have Ambroid kits I built 40 years ago. I used Ambroid's cement without
incident . . . . *snip*

Rich Orr
Well, different strokes for different folks. I detest Ambroid cement.

SGL


Re: Pere Marquette freight cars in N scale

destron@...
 

You'll need 1 - 1 1/2 foot extensions added to the top of the "standard"
car.

Al Kresse
Which "standard" car?

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


-------------- Original message --------------
From: destron@...

First off a question: they aren't in the Revenue Freight cars book, but do
Atlas' 70-ton ore cars in Pere Marquette lettering (#39990A, road #CF1512;
#39991A, road #CF1523) have a prototype?

Beyond that, I've started poking through what's available in N scale to
determine what could be used as basis models for modelling PM freight
cars... here's the list I've made so far. If anyone has tips for others,
or better solutions to the ones I've listed, I'd love to hear it!

13000-13999
14000-14499 - Microtrains twin hopper: The picture on the website is
small, but looks right at a quick inspection.

16000-16099 - Red Caboose USRA flatcar: overall a good basis I think, only
would have to rearrange the stake pockets and the brake staff to make an
accurate model.

17000-17249
17250-17649 - Intermountain USRA drop-bottom gon: I think this will need a
little bit of tweaking, but the general appearance looks right. I picked
one of these kits up today, so will be attempting to build one of these
cars first.

20000-20024
20025-20049
20050-20149 - Deluxe Innovations ACF 2-Bay covered hopper: The pictures on
the website are small, but overall look right enough to use as a basis for
these PM cars

72200-72399 - Intermountain 50' AAR double-door boxcar: this would I think
be a standin at best, judging from the photos of the model (which are
here, too, almost uselessly small on the website, so it may be better than
I think, or conversely worse than I think).

80000-81999 - Atlas USRA double-sheath car: pretty much as-is, I think,
apart from detailing.

82000-83499 - Red Caboose X29 with Dreadnaught ends and Youngstown doors:
the handbrake and roof are wrong, but this is probably fixable. The
dimensions of the X29 and the 82000srs cars are pretty close (in the April
1942 ORER), and appearance-wise, it looks like this model could serve
(with modification) to represent the first PM all-steel boxcars.

83500-83649
83650-83799
83800-83999
84100-84399 - Intermountain 40' 1937 AAR boxcar. With IM's interchangeable
parts, the differences in ends and doors shouldn't be an issue, I don't
think, if they have a 4/5 W end and both 7-panel Superior and 5-7-5
Youngstown doors.

85000-85999
86000-87499 - Atlas USRA double-sheath car: for the single-door versions
the Atlas car could serve as a starting point for a kitbash. The Vulcan
and Hutchins ends would of course have to be scratchbuilt, and steel-door
versions would need the doors changed... even the door-and-a-half versions
could be done, I think, with the Atlas model as a basis. I'm planning to
do several of these over the next while (as I can get my hands on the
models!)

That's it for now, still need to look at available steel gondola models.
If there's one or two available that could serve as basis models, I think
with a bit of effort a good representation of the PM's freight car fleet
can be made in 1:160. :)

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




!DSPAM:1291,490f6d2589289238716453!

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I had a few cars that curled up from decaling water like that. Not much fun trying to reassemble a
car on the fly while also trying to make sure the decals are in the right place and not getting
folded over. The worst one was an Olympia Beer reefer kit (manufacturer long since forgotten). The
decals were bedsheets across the sides, so it took a LOT of water to a) get them off the backer
sheets, and b) float them into position on the sides.

My decal-application techniques have improves a little (!) since then, but I later learned (on the
next car, for instance) that a couple coats of sanding sealer (model aircraft "dope" works really
well) along with some sanding to get a smooth surface seals the wood sufficiently that you don't
have nearly so much chance of having the car sides curl up on you. Just be sure to use the back of
an X-acto knife to clear out the scribing, or it gets full of dust which the next coat of sealer
makes a pretty permanent part of the siding. Don't get too aggressive with the knife and rescribe
everything too deeply - you can split the wood (and how does he know that, I wonder?). Just clean
out the grooves. If it does split, glue some paper to the back side, and seal that, too. I used
400 grit paper at the end of the process, starting with 220 or 320.

This also has a tendency to make the scribing a bit more subtle, which is a good thing, and pretty
much eliminates raised grain issues which can really make a car look like s***.

Seal both sides, before you start assembling anything. Roof and floor, too, but you probably can
skip the end blocks.

Oh, right, the original question was about glue: Elmer's yellow carpenter glue. Sets up fairly
quickly and is VERY strong. Better, IMHO, than white.

SGL

From: Earl T. Hackett

The oldest wooden models I have on the layout are about 30 years old.
I built them with plain old Elmer's White Glue. The stuff holds up
well over the years. However, if you apply decals to an assembled
model, it will come apart. White glue is water soluble. The water
also swells the wood and that doesn't help things either. To avoid
this problem paint and decal the sides or other components before
assembly.

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "lnerj72" <lnerj72@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions?



Ed Hawkins - Please Contact Me off-list

paulbizier <pa.bizier@...>
 

Ed:

Need help re: Amarillo Rail Museum ART reefer...

Paul


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Cyril Durrenberger
 

I have not had that problem if dry transfers are used and the car is built with white glue.  I have had some on the layout for 35 years and they still look pretty much like they did years ago.  Some are LaBelle kits and others are scratch built from wood, before styrene was available.  I have used decals on some of the cars, but have not had much problem except in one case.  Paint the car well before applying to seal it and then use a minimal amount of water.  Canopy glue is great too.

Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Mon, 11/3/08, Earl T. Hackett <hacketet@...> wrote:
From: Earl T. Hackett <hacketet@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits
To: STMFC@...
Date: Monday, November 3, 2008, 4:38 PM











The oldest wooden models I have on the layout are about 30 years old.

I built them with plain old Elmer's White Glue. The stuff holds up

well over the years. However, if you apply decals to an assembled

model, it will come apart. White glue is water soluble. The water

also swells the wood and that doesn't help things either. To avoid

this problem paint and decal the sides or other components before

assembly.



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "lnerj72" <lnerj72@... > wrote:

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions?

























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Spen Kellogg <spenkellogg@...>
 

lnerj72 wrote:

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions? Weld-bond, yellow carpenters glue, regular
white glue, CA?
I am thinking about using Weld-Bond as it seems to be the crazy glue
of white glues.
Iain,

I have had very good luck using a canopy glue from Pacer. I don't have any handy so I am not sure of the name, but it starts with Formula and then a number. It's very similar to white glue. That is a trick I learned from Scotty Mason.

Regards, Spen Kellogg
.


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Earl T. Hackett <hacketet@...>
 

The oldest wooden models I have on the layout are about 30 years old.
I built them with plain old Elmer's White Glue. The stuff holds up
well over the years. However, if you apply decals to an assembled
model, it will come apart. White glue is water soluble. The water
also swells the wood and that doesn't help things either. To avoid
this problem paint and decal the sides or other components before
assembly.

--- In STMFC@..., "lnerj72" <lnerj72@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions?


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Ray Meyer
 

BTW< her's this to that's take on Weldbond:
http://www.thistothat.com/glue/weldbond.shtml

On Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 5:06 PM, Ray Meyer <rgmeyer2@...> wrote:

My best results have been with plain old white glue. CA is a bad choice
for wood. If you ever have a question, this is a good site:
http://www.thistothat.com/


On Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 4:43 PM, lnerj72 <lnerj72@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions? Weld-bond, yellow carpenters glue, regular
white glue, CA?
I am thinking about using Weld-Bond as it seems to be the crazy glue
of white glues.

Cheers
Iain




--
Atty Raymond G. Meyer
110 E. Main St
Port Washington, WI 53074
262-284-5566
rgmeyer2@...
--
Atty Raymond G. Meyer
110 E. Main St
Port Washington, WI 53074
262-284-5566
rgmeyer2@...


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

Ray Meyer
 

My best results have been with plain old white glue. CA is a bad choice for
wood. If you ever have a question, this is a good site:
http://www.thistothat.com/

On Mon, Nov 3, 2008 at 4:43 PM, lnerj72 <lnerj72@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions? Weld-bond, yellow carpenters glue, regular
white glue, CA?
I am thinking about using Weld-Bond as it seems to be the crazy glue
of white glues.

Cheers
Iain


--
Atty Raymond G. Meyer
110 E. Main St
Port Washington, WI 53074
262-284-5566
rgmeyer2@...


Wooden Craftsman Kits

lnerj72 <lnerj72@...>
 

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions? Weld-bond, yellow carpenters glue, regular
white glue, CA?
I am thinking about using Weld-Bond as it seems to be the crazy glue
of white glues.

Cheers
Iain


Re: Pere Marquette freight cars in N scale

water.kresse@...
 

You'll need 1 - 1 1/2 foot extensions added to the top of the "standard" car.

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: destron@...

First off a question: they aren't in the Revenue Freight cars book, but do
Atlas' 70-ton ore cars in Pere Marquette lettering (#39990A, road #CF1512;
#39991A, road #CF1523) have a prototype?

Beyond that, I've started poking through what's available in N scale to
determine what could be used as basis models for modelling PM freight
cars... here's the list I've made so far. If anyone has tips for others,
or better solutions to the ones I've listed, I'd love to hear it!

13000-13999
14000-14499 - Microtrains twin hopper: The picture on the website is
small, but looks right at a quick inspection.

16000-16099 - Red Caboose USRA flatcar: overall a good basis I think, only
would have to rearrange the stake pockets and the brake staff to make an
accurate model.

17000-17249
17250-17649 - Intermountain USRA drop-bottom gon: I think this will need a
little bit of tweaking, but the general appearance looks right. I picked
one of these kits up today, so will be attempting to build one of these
cars first.

20000-20024
20025-20049
20050-20149 - Deluxe Innovations ACF 2-Bay covered hopper: The pictures on
the website are small, but overall look right enough to use as a basis for
these PM cars

72200-72399 - Intermountain 50' AAR double-door boxcar: this would I think
be a standin at best, judging from the photos of the model (which are
here, too, almost uselessly small on the website, so it may be better than
I think, or conversely worse than I think).

80000-81999 - Atlas USRA double-sheath car: pretty much as-is, I think,
apart from detailing.

82000-83499 - Red Caboose X29 with Dreadnaught ends and Youngstown doors:
the handbrake and roof are wrong, but this is probably fixable. The
dimensions of the X29 and the 82000srs cars are pretty close (in the April
1942 ORER), and appearance-wise, it looks like this model could serve
(with modification) to represent the first PM all-steel boxcars.

83500-83649
83650-83799
83800-83999
84100-84399 - Intermountain 40' 1937 AAR boxcar. With IM's interchangeable
parts, the differences in ends and doors shouldn't be an issue, I don't
think, if they have a 4/5 W end and both 7-panel Superior and 5-7-5
Youngstown doors.

85000-85999
86000-87499 - Atlas USRA double-sheath car: for the single-door versions
the Atlas car could serve as a starting point for a kitbash. The Vulcan
and Hutchins ends would of course have to be scratchbuilt, and steel-door
versions would need the doors changed... even the door-and-a-half versions
could be done, I think, with the Atlas model as a basis. I'm planning to
do several of these over the next while (as I can get my hands on the
models!)

That's it for now, still need to look at available steel gondola models.
If there's one or two available that could serve as basis models, I think
with a bit of effort a good representation of the PM's freight car fleet
can be made in 1:160. :)

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Wooden Craftsman Kits

SUVCWORR@...
 

I have Ambroid kits I built 40 years ago. I used Ambroid's cement without
incident. Apply several coats of sanding sealer to the model before painting
(sand between each coat) then there is no issue with water or decal solvent
being absorbed by the wood. It works best if the sealer is applied after the
basic car is built but before the detail parts are added.

Rich Orr

In a message dated 11/3/2008 7:38:39 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
hacketet@... writes:

The oldest wooden models I have on the layout are about 30 years old.
I built them with plain old Elmer's White Glue. The stuff holds up
well over the years. However, if you apply decals to an assembled
model, it will come apart. White glue is water soluble. The water
also swells the wood and that doesn't help things either. To avoid
this problem paint and decal the sides or other components before
assembly.

--- In STMFC@..., "lnerj72" <lnerj72@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,
A quick question, I am about to start on some wooden
freight car kits from various manufacturers (Pacific Pike, Ambroid,
Juneco, etc) and I was wondering what would be the best glue to use
for the wooden portions?


------------------------------------

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