Date   

(No subject)

Larry Jackman <Ljack70117@...>
 

Hi Fellow list buddies.
I writing this to let you know I will not be at Cocoa Beach this year. I am moving back to Seattle area By the end of Dec. I never really liked Florida. We came down to look after my wife's Mother. She died in Jan 2007 and my wife died in Oct 2007. I have a daughter in Seattle. She wants me to move out there. I will still be on the list but my health is going down hill and this will probably be my last plane flight..
Thank you all
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@comcast.net


Re: Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific boxcars

destron@...
 

Thanks for the answer, Ian.

The photo in Canadian Railway & Marine World, January 1917 issue, shows a
build date of November 1916 for this car.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

It did. When the Canadian Northern system (including the DW&P) was
amalgamated with others to form the Canadian National Railways in
1918, the new system moved to rationalize the numbering systems of
its various predecessors. In December 1920 a renumbering guide was
issued for former Canadian Northern, Canadian Government Railways,
DW&P and Intercolonial equipment which neatly grouped equipment by
general type into new series. A second such guide was issued in 1923
to cover Grand Trunk and Grand Trunk Pacific equipment.

DW&P 30426 was assigned into the 4xxxxx series, which was reserved
for 40-ton boxcars, and this particular car was assigned DW&P
401013. A CN built date summary from the 1920s shows a built date of
October 1916 for this particular car, but I have seen stencilled
dates vary from the official recorded dates before.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@nakina.net
http://freightcars.nakina.net
http://siberians.nakina.net


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




!DSPAM:1291,491d9bd689281135479307!

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific boxcars

Ian Cranstone
 

On 14-Nov-08, at 3:31 AM, destron@vcn.bc.ca wrote:
Did DW&P freight cars ever undergo a renumbering? I found a builder's
photo of DW&P 30426, a 36' double-sheathed truss-rod boxcar built in
November, 1916, and am wondering if this might not later have become part
of the 400800-401549 series of 36' boxcars listed in the April 1942 ORER.
It did. When the Canadian Northern system (including the DW&P) was amalgamated with others to form the Canadian National Railways in 1918, the new system moved to rationalize the numbering systems of its various predecessors. In December 1920 a renumbering guide was issued for former Canadian Northern, Canadian Government Railways, DW&P and Intercolonial equipment which neatly grouped equipment by general type into new series. A second such guide was issued in 1923 to cover Grand Trunk and Grand Trunk Pacific equipment.

DW&P 30426 was assigned into the 4xxxxx series, which was reserved for 40-ton boxcars, and this particular car was assigned DW&P 401013. A CN built date summary from the 1920s shows a built date of October 1916 for this particular car, but I have seen stencilled dates vary from the official recorded dates before.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@nakina.net
http://freightcars.nakina.net
http://siberians.nakina.net


Re: Modelling a PS-5 Gondola in HO

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Alan;



I am in the middle of a PS-5 bash, and found when looking at photos that
PS-5's seem to have varied a lot, depending on built dates and customer
preferences, so some have a side very much like a so-called "Greenville" gon,
others have ribs of differing widths; there are also some welded side
versions. Which is yours? How many ribs? Fixed or drop end?



Oh, I am using the Life-Like P2K sides (and floor) with some home-made ends.
PS gon ends for my era of car looked a bit like their PS-1 box car ends but
with abbreviated ribs, of course.



Elden Gatwood



________________________________

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Staffan Ehnbom
Sent: Friday, November 14, 2008 5:39 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Modelling a PS-5 Gondola in HO



There was an ad in the 1961 Car Builders' Cyclopedia with a drawing of the
side and end of a PS-5. No underframe drawing and not the usual CBC detail
type drawing.

Many years ago National Car Cast of Canada produced styrene side and end
castings for a NYC gon. The sides had great similarities to the PS-5 sides
but that every other of the PS-5 side ribs were heavier than the others,
which should be fixable.

Staffan Ehnbom

----- Original Message -----
From: Alan Palmer
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 11:28 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Modelling a PS-5 Gondola in HO

Hi All,

This came up recently on the Rutland list and I am looking for more
information. Does anyone know of photos or plans or even a kit of the
Pullman Standard PS-5 Gondola. I am looking to build a few that the
Rutland had. They were 52'6" inside length. Photos from the Rutland
are few and far between.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

Alan

--
--
Alan Palmer
http://rrgeekdev.googlepages.com/home <http://rrgeekdev.googlepages.com/home>


__________ NOD32 3611 (20081113) Information __________

This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
http://www.eset.com <http://www.eset.com>


Re: Modelling a PS-5 Gondola in HO

Staffan Ehnbom <staffan.ehnbom@...>
 

There was an ad in the 1961 Car Builders' Cyclopedia with a drawing of the side and end of a PS-5. No underframe drawing and not the usual CBC detail type drawing.

Many years ago National Car Cast of Canada produced styrene side and end castings for a NYC gon. The sides had great similarities to the PS-5 sides but that every other of the PS-5 side ribs were heavier than the others, which should be fixable.

Staffan Ehnbom

----- Original Message -----
From: Alan Palmer
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 11:28 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Modelling a PS-5 Gondola in HO


Hi All,

This came up recently on the Rutland list and I am looking for more
information. Does anyone know of photos or plans or even a kit of the
Pullman Standard PS-5 Gondola. I am looking to build a few that the
Rutland had. They were 52'6" inside length. Photos from the Rutland
are few and far between.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

Alan

--
--
Alan Palmer
http://rrgeekdev.googlepages.com/home




__________ NOD32 3611 (20081113) Information __________

This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
http://www.eset.com


Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific boxcars

destron@...
 

Did DW&P freight cars ever undergo a renumbering? I found a builder's
photo of DW&P 30426, a 36' double-sheathed truss-rod boxcar built in
November, 1916, and am wondering if this might not later have become part
of the 400800-401549 series of 36' boxcars listed in the April 1942 ORER.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations

rfederle@...
 

U-Bolts were used where the pipe runs directly along side a surface. A Pipe Clamp and "Standoff" is used where support is not adjacent to the pipe. Pipe Clamps and Standoffs are a welded assembly with formed straps (sized for the outside diameter of the pipe) where the pipe fits and a bolt at each side of that strap clamps the pipe in place.

Robert Federle
---- Andy Carlson <midcentury@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Utah Pacific GE lift rings are small. Another use would be fine soft brass wire and just wrap through one hole capturing the pipe...

I have peeked under the skirts of many boxcars and air line pipes were frequently mounted with what looks like a muffler clamp (a U-bolt), and the GE lift rings come awfully close to that look and function.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


--- On Thu, 11/13/08, Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca> wrote:

From: Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 9:03 PM
I'm not sure what lift ring product you have in mind
Andy. Would it have
the appearance of the prototype? If not, why use such a
part with a fine
scale detail part?

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Andy Carlson"
<midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 5:41 PM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations


Looking closely at the new Hi-Tech air brake hose, I
don't see a need for
the PSC airhose bracket.

The Hi-Tech part has a length of train air line of
about 26 inches molded
as part of the hose, and this hose has a mounting
bracket cast as part of
the hose with an angle cock shut off valve molded on
as well. If someone
were to use a small brass lift ring the air line could
be attached to the
side of the coupler draft gear box for a simple and
very secure
attachment. There would be no need to use the
(redundant)PSC bracket.
Other mounting locations, like to a small plate
suspended from the end
sill, could still be provided by using the same small
lift rings as a
mounting clamp. Glue might even be unnecessary.

It sure is nice to have these fine scale features in a
non-breakable
material.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations

Andy Carlson
 

Utah Pacific GE lift rings are small. Another use would be fine soft brass wire and just wrap through one hole capturing the pipe...

I have peeked under the skirts of many boxcars and air line pipes were frequently mounted with what looks like a muffler clamp (a U-bolt), and the GE lift rings come awfully close to that look and function.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- On Thu, 11/13/08, Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca> wrote:

From: Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, November 13, 2008, 9:03 PM
I'm not sure what lift ring product you have in mind
Andy. Would it have
the appearance of the prototype? If not, why use such a
part with a fine
scale detail part?

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Andy Carlson"
<midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 5:41 PM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations


Looking closely at the new Hi-Tech air brake hose, I
don't see a need for
the PSC airhose bracket.

The Hi-Tech part has a length of train air line of
about 26 inches molded
as part of the hose, and this hose has a mounting
bracket cast as part of
the hose with an angle cock shut off valve molded on
as well. If someone
were to use a small brass lift ring the air line could
be attached to the
side of the coupler draft gear box for a simple and
very secure
attachment. There would be no need to use the
(redundant)PSC bracket.
Other mounting locations, like to a small plate
suspended from the end
sill, could still be provided by using the same small
lift rings as a
mounting clamp. Glue might even be unnecessary.

It sure is nice to have these fine scale features in a
non-breakable
material.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: a GATX prototype for SC&F tanks?

Robert kirkham
 

OK - thanks for that. I used the word in conversation last weekend with a friend and got a strange look, so thought there must be a disconnect...

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@signaturepress.com>
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 10:47 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: a GATX prototype for SC&F tanks?

Rob Kirkham wrote:
Also, I think I have heard the Standard Tank bolster/saddle part
described as a diaphragm. Maybe I'm wrong about that - its a vague
memory. Any comments on the unique (I perceive) design used by
Standard and the correct nomenclature for it?
Rob, it's a distinctive and even signature appearance,
unmistakable as a Standard Tank design, but functionally not unlike
other builders' designs, as a combined bolster and tank saddle. I've
never heard it called a "diaphragm."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations

Robert kirkham
 

I'm not sure what lift ring product you have in mind Andy. Would it have the appearance of the prototype? If not, why use such a part with a fine scale detail part?

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Andy Carlson" <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 5:41 PM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations


Looking closely at the new Hi-Tech air brake hose, I don't see a need for the PSC airhose bracket.

The Hi-Tech part has a length of train air line of about 26 inches molded as part of the hose, and this hose has a mounting bracket cast as part of the hose with an angle cock shut off valve molded on as well. If someone were to use a small brass lift ring the air line could be attached to the side of the coupler draft gear box for a simple and very secure attachment. There would be no need to use the (redundant)PSC bracket. Other mounting locations, like to a small plate suspended from the end sill, could still be provided by using the same small lift rings as a mounting clamp. Glue might even be unnecessary.

It sure is nice to have these fine scale features in a non-breakable material.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Hi-Tech airbrake hose installations

Andy Carlson
 

Looking closely at the new Hi-Tech air brake hose, I don't see a need for the PSC airhose bracket.

The Hi-Tech part has a length of train air line of about 26 inches molded as part of the hose, and this hose has a mounting bracket cast as part of the hose with an angle cock shut off valve molded on as well. If someone were to use a small brass lift ring the air line could be attached to the side of the coupler draft gear box for a simple and very secure attachment. There would be no need to use the (redundant)PSC bracket. Other mounting locations, like to a small plate suspended from the end sill, could still be provided by using the same small lift rings as a mounting clamp. Glue might even be unnecessary.

It sure is nice to have these fine scale features in a non-breakable material.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Hi-Tech rubber freight car hoses are here

Andy Carlson
 

I have received a large order of rubber HO freight car hoses from Hi-Tech models, # 6036.

There are 5 pairs of hoses per package, enough for 5 freight cars. I am offering these for sale for $4.00 package.

I also have the diesel MU rubber hose set, which has enough sander and MU hoses for one diesel per package, also priced at $4.00 per package.

Shipping is $2.00 per order in a padded envelope. Those requesting boxed priority mail can send $5.00 instead. I accept money orders and personal checks.

I can be contacted off-list (please)at:
<midcentury@sbcglobal.net>

Andy Carlson
111 S Encinal Ave
Ojai CA 93023


Re: Intermountain GN plywood panel boxcars

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

Intermountain is now advertising two GN plywood panel boxcars.
No. 46051 BLT 9-45 is labeled "original" & is green with orange sides.
No. 46052 BLT 9-45 labeled "mineral red" is apparently all box car red.

Has anyone seen these cars "in the flesh?" If yes, are there any
really egregious inaccuracies?

Apparently these cars were numbered in series 10000-10499 & 10500-
10899. One of the first series and two of the second series appear on
the Landmesser hot box list so I think I should have a couple on my
model railroad.

I infer that "original" means the as delivered paint scheme.

If this inference is correct the question is, when were the GN plywood
panel boxcars repainted mineral red?

BTW, it is always September 1950 on my model railroad.

Gene Green
Mr. Green,
I haven't seen the cars "in the flesh", but if the photos of the car on John Golden PBase
page are any indication, I won't be getting rid of my Sunshine cars anytime soon. I just
think the details are executed better, especially the sidesills.

As far as paint schemes, the earliest pictures of mineral red GN plywood boxcars I have
seen have repaint dates of 1953. For your era, I would stick with the orange scheme.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, IA


Re: Modelling a PS-5 Gondola in HO

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Alan Palmer wrote:
This came up recently on the Rutland list and I am looking for more information. Does anyone know of photos or plans or even a kit of the Pullman Standard PS-5 Gondola.
Alan, there are good builder photos of PS-5 gons in Ed Kaminski's book on Pullman-Standard freight cars. Full disclosure: we published it.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Modelling a PS-5 Gondola in HO

Alan Palmer <rrgeekdev@...>
 

Hi All,

This came up recently on the Rutland list and I am looking for more
information. Does anyone know of photos or plans or even a kit of the
Pullman Standard PS-5 Gondola. I am looking to build a few that the
Rutland had. They were 52'6" inside length. Photos from the Rutland
are few and far between.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

Alan


--
--
Alan Palmer
http://rrgeekdev.googlepages.com/home


Intermountain GN plywood panel boxcars

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Intermountain is now advertising two GN plywood panel boxcars.
No. 46051 BLT 9-45 is labeled "original" & is green with orange sides.
No. 46052 BLT 9-45 labeled "mineral red" is apparently all box car red.

Has anyone seen these cars "in the flesh?" If yes, are there any
really egregious inaccuracies?

Apparently these cars were numbered in series 10000-10499 & 10500-
10899. One of the first series and two of the second series appear on
the Landmesser hot box list so I think I should have a couple on my
model railroad.

I infer that "original" means the as delivered paint scheme.

If this inference is correct the question is, when were the GN plywood
panel boxcars repainted mineral red?

BTW, it is always September 1950 on my model railroad.

Gene Green


Re: Read before writing

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Unfortunately, sometimes Yahoo's archive system cannot find message
posts on various topics. More than a few times I've searched for items
I know were discussed on this and other groups and they don't come up.
Other times they do. I've even experienced having my own posts on my
own Yahoo groups unlocated with the system telling me that there is no
such topic and no such author.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

====================
-- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

Sorry about message 77118 which repeats some information contained in
Richard Hendrickson's earlier message. I need to read all the
messages
before responding to any messages. Richard H's responses are always
better and more accurate than mine.

Gene Green


Re: a GATX prototype for SC&F tanks?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Larry Grubb wrote:
I am not familiar with the particular design in question, but when researching Type 21 tank cars, the correct nomenclature for the support at the center underside of the tank was "saddle" and the supports above the bolsters were "cradles". The tank was attached to the saddle and rested on the cradles, thus allowing for expansion.
No, the center support is a tank anchor and has been since at least World War I (see any Cyc issue). Though the sliding support at the bolster is indeed often called a cradle, it is equally defined (see any Cyc issue) as a saddle -- see definition entries under "tank saddle," etc.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: a GATX prototype for SC&F tanks?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 12, 2008, at 10:08 PM, Rob Kirkham wrote:

A follow up question: where we have a photo of a car in a given
GATX number
series, is it likely that all or most other cars in the series are
of the
same design?




Alas, no. GATC's ORER entries consisted, for the most part, of large
number series within which were cars of many different types, sizes,
and builders. GATC was in the habit of renumbering cars whenever
they were re-leased or their assigned service changed. Photos offer
the only real assurance about car numbers; if you don't have photos,
break out your old Ouija board.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: a GATX prototype for SC&F tanks?

Larry Grubb <larry450sl@...>
 

I am not familiar with the particular design in question, but when researching Type 21 tank cars, the correct nomenclature for the support at the center underside of the tank was "saddle" and the supports above the bolsters were "cradles". The tank was attached to the saddle and rested on the cradles, thus allowing for expansion.
Larry Grubb

Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com> wrote:
Rob Kirkham wrote:
Also, I think I have heard the Standard Tank bolster/saddle part
described as a diaphragm. Maybe I'm wrong about that - its a vague
memory. Any comments on the unique (I perceive) design used by
Standard and the correct nomenclature for it?
Rob, it's a distinctive and even signature appearance,
unmistakable as a Standard Tank design, but functionally not unlike
other builders' designs, as a combined bolster and tank saddle. I've
never heard it called a "diaphragm."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history

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