Date   

Re: Up car help

Tim O'Connor
 

At 11/23/2008 01:52 PM Sunday, you wrote:
Hey everyone,
I have some questions regarding 2 UP cars:
1. Does anyone out there have a picture of a UP gon in the 99500-99999
number series? I am not sure of the class.
2. What type of roof did the Class A50-19 40' double door box cars have,
raised panel, or diagonal panel.
3. What color was the roof on the A50-19?
Any help is greatly appreciated.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Re: Up car help

Aley, Jeff A
 

Rick,

UP 99500 - 99999 were class G-50-9, per Terry Metcalfe Union Pacific Freight Cars 1936-51 Appendix D. I don't think I have any photos.

The A-50-19 had Murphy Panel roofs, per William Metzger "Roster of UP Steel Box and Autocars", The Streamliner Vol. 3, No. 1.

The roof, ends, and underframe were to get "One coat of approved primer and two coats of approved aluminum paint." This is for cars 51850, 518000-518015, 518200, and 518100-518104. The diagram shows the "automated rail way" slogan. This info is from Union Pacific Railroad Co. Research and Mechanical Standards, Painting, Lettering & Numbering, Stenciling Arrangement, 303-C-20650 rev E, Date 7-21-65, as reproduced in The Streamliner, Vol. 6, No. 2.

When built in 1947, the car likely had either an oxide red roof, or black car cement. Perhaps someone else (Dick Harley?) can comment on whether or not car cement was used on these cars. Perhaps Dick can also comment on when the yellow / aluminum scheme was applied.

Regards,

-Jeff


________________________________
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of rdietrichson
Sent: Sunday, November 23, 2008 10:52 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Up car help


Hey everyone,
I have some questions regarding 2 UP cars:
1. Does anyone out there have a picture of a UP gon in the 99500-99999
number series? I am not sure of the class.
2. What type of roof did the Class A50-19 40' double door box cars have,
raised panel, or diagonal panel.
3. What color was the roof on the A50-19?
Any help is greatly appreciated.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Re: Up car help

al_brown03
 

That's class G-50-9. There's a picture of UP 99721 in MM 5/86 p 44,
loaded with refrigerator-car frames; I think the same picture may
appear in Tony Thompson's PFE books. There's a builder's shot of UP
99780 on the front cover of Train Shed Cyc #46, also inside on p 227
(which I believe to be the page number from the '31 CBC).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., "rdietrichson" <Rdietrichson@...> wrote:

Hey everyone,
I have some questions regarding 2 UP cars:
1. Does anyone out there have a picture of a UP gon in the 99500-99999
number series? I am not sure of the class.
2. What type of roof did the Class A50-19 40' double door box cars
have,
raised panel, or diagonal panel.
3. What color was the roof on the A50-19?
Any help is greatly appreciated.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Up car help

rdietrichson
 

Hey everyone,
I have some questions regarding 2 UP cars:
1. Does anyone out there have a picture of a UP gon in the 99500-99999
number series? I am not sure of the class.
2. What type of roof did the Class A50-19 40' double door box cars have,
raised panel, or diagonal panel.
3. What color was the roof on the A50-19?
Any help is greatly appreciated.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Re: UTLX question

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I have the article, and am contemplating buying a kit or two. But
for this very common car, it'd be nice to see a styrene kit or RTR
model on the market. I have built more than a few resin cars, and a
resin-bash of a Norwest Imperial Oil tank car almost wore me out...

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

Eric wrote:

These are challenging kits that build into very nice models. If
you
are not familiar with resin kit construction, you may want to
start
with a gondola or box car to gain confidence before tackling one
of
the UTLX models.
The construction of this particular kit is also covered in Ted's
Essential
Freight Cars #12 article from the May 2004 issue of RMC...

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: UTLX X3 Truck question

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 23, 2008, at 7:58 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Don Burn asked:
"The recent UTLX discussions, had me go back to look at the Essential
Freight Cars article about the X3 tank cars. A number of the photos
show one spring of a truck on the car being some sort of cylindrical
device rather than a traditional spring. Can someone tell me what this
is and the era it was used? I've never seen one modeled, and am
curious."

It's a snubber. A chronic problem through the 1960s was the tendency
of cars to exhibit poor riding qualities, particularly rocking, due to
resonance at the harmonic frequency of the truck springs caused by a
combination of rough track at a given speed. To combat this, the
railroads tried several solutions, including leaf-coil spring packages
and snubbers.

As for modeling snubbers, I haven't tried yet and am open to ideas
actually tried by other modelers.



















Starting in the 1930s, snubbers which replaced one spring on each
side of each truck were a popular way to improve riding qualities
without replacing trucks, and some car owners even bought new trucks
with such snubbers rather than spending additional money for trucks
with built-in bolster snubbers such as the Barber Stabilized and ASF
A-3. So snubbers are seen in many photos of steam era freight cars,
and are a detail worth modeling as our standards of prototype
accuracy continue to improve. Modeling snubbers isn't a simple
matter, though, as each of the railway appliance manufacturers
offered patented snubbers of their own design. Some of them (e,g,,
Symington SBR, Gustin-Bacon G-B, National F-2-A, Sun T-2-D) fit
inside the standard springs and thus were all but invisible
(especially in HO scale). Others (e.g., Cardwell Type A, Frost No.
360) were replacement springs that didn't appear much different
externally from a standard spring (again, especially in HO scale).
But some of the most popular (Miner C-2-XB, Holland A-6, ASF Simplex)
were quite visible and, unfortunately, all different in appearance.
All these are well illustrated in the Car Builders' Cyclopedias of
the 1930s and '40s. Any attempt to model them would require gouging
one of the existing springs out of each truck side frame and
replacing it with a simulated snubber, and securing the replacement
parts to truck frames made of Delrin or similar slippery engineering
plastic is notoriously challenging. All of which is why most of us
haven't tried it.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: LIFE Magazine Photos- PFE Reefers

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Morrill" <badlands@...> wrote:

I've been in Bisbee and it definitely is not Bisbee, AZ. If the
Arizona
part is correct, perhaps it is Phoenix.
Charlie
A word of caution about the Time-Life photo captions, they were most
likely done by summer interns from information written on the sleeves
the photos were in. I was going through a series that claimed to be
the Soo Locks, and came across a photo of a boat entering the Chicago
River, with the double deck Lake Shore Drive drawbridge open, and
traffic backed up all around the infamous "S" curve, which has been
gone for years now. Other photos appeared to be taken on the St. Clair
River. Detroit was the location given for all these "Soo locks"
photos, very likely because the assignment was originally something
about lake traffic and how it affected Detroit. Oh, and there actually
was one or two photos of the Soo locks in the group. Reader beware.

Dennis


Re: More Hoppers

Scott Pitzer
 

http://index.mrmag.com/tm.exe?
opt=I&MAG=RMJ&MO=12&YR=1991&output=3&sort=D
I believe the T&P article shown here had to do with rib side cars
pretty close to C&O cars of the 1950s.
Scott Pitzer

--- In STMFC@..., Justin Kahn <harumd@...> wrote:

The other problematic Max Gray car is a rib (i.e., external) side
triple hopper with rounded end extensions; I already owned a similar
car with panelsides, apparently a C&O prototype, so I would assume the
C&O had these, as well (some of which were presumably re-built with the
panelsides). My question is whether anyone else had these cars? The
Max Gray spotters guide shows the plain ribside version lettered for
T&P, but model railroaders were not so fastidious about prototype 30+
years ago.


Re: UTLX X3 Truck question

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Don Burn asked:
"The recent UTLX discussions, had me go back to look at the Essential
Freight Cars article about the X3 tank cars. A number of the photos
show one spring of a truck on the car being some sort of cylindrical
device rather than a traditional spring. Can someone tell me what this
is and the era it was used? I've never seen one modeled, and am
curious."

It's a snubber. A chronic problem through the 1960s was the tendency
of cars to exhibit poor riding qualities, particularly rocking, due to
resonance at the harmonic frequency of the truck springs caused by a
combination of rough track at a given speed. To combat this, the
railroads tried several solutions, including leaf-coil spring packages
and snubbers.

As for modeling snubbers, I haven't tried yet and am open to ideas
actually tried by other modelers.


Ben Hom


UTLX X3 Truck question

Don Burn
 

The recent UTLX discussions, had me go back to look at the Essential Freight Cars article about the X3 tank cars. A number of the photos show one spring of a truck on the car being some sort of cylindrical device rather than a traditional spring. Can someone tell me what this is and the era it was used? I've never seen one modeled, and am curious.

Don Burn


Re: LIFE Magazine Photos

water.kresse@...
 

Isn't that the Blue Island platform on the SW side of town?

Al Kresse

-------------- Original message --------------
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Anyone recognize this location in the Chicago area? That
deck-on-a-deck structure on the left would seem to be a
landmark, I don't recall ever seeing that before.

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?q=Railroads+source:life&imgurl=c8c944bb1f85f35a

Tim O'Connor


Re: LIFE Magazine Photos- PFE Reefers

Dick Harley
 

It's interesting that the R-30-11 in the foreground still appears to have a metal medallion screwed to the side, since the removal of those metal medallions started in early 1936 - supposedly for safety reasons.

It appears that its reweigh date is 1942, so that part of the photo label seems correct.

Cheers,
Dick Harley


Tank Car Photos from LIFE Magazine

Jerry <jrs060@...>
 

Look at the Magnolia insulated tank cars that were photographed at Beaumont,
Texas during 1942 in this T&NO yard scene! There is some very interesting stuff
here for sure.

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?
q=beaumont+source:life&imgurl=d4a027a3d4f601fd



Happiness, Jerry Stewart

Woodstock, Illinois


Re: Image Of Union Pacific Stock Cars From LIFE Magazine

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

There was a Naval Ordnance proving grounds "near" there that is now the Idaho National Laboratory. It's where the first power nuclear reactor was built (IIRC) and the home to something like 54 nuclear reactors over the years. I believe there is still a coal-fired power plant there.

(I say "near" because nothing out there is really close to anything else. The shipping address to INL is variously Arco or Scoville, Idaho; Scovile in nothing but a wye on the facility, Arco is the nearest town, about 20 miles from the main gate.)

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor

What was at Arco, Idaho that would require coal from the Rio Grande?
A smelter of some kind?


Re: LIFE Magazine Photos

Tim O'Connor
 

Anyone recognize this location in the Chicago area? That
deck-on-a-deck structure on the left would seem to be a
landmark, I don't recall ever seeing that before.

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?q=Railroads+source:life&imgurl=c8c944bb1f85f35a

Tim O'Connor


Re: New Modernized R7 Resin Kit

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Richard - You have my permission to use the photos. I'm attaching better copies. The kits are new and shipping now. - Al

----- Original Message -----
From: Rhbale@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, November 22, 2008 6:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: New Modernized R7 Resin Kit


Hello Al:

I request permission to download and use your photo of the Matheison R7 in a
new products column that will appear in Model Railroad Hobbyist Magazine - a
new E-zine that may be accessed at http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com.

I gather from the information on your web that the modernized R7 is brand new
and that you are shipping now. Thanks in advance for the release.

Richard Bale
AKA The Old Yardmaster

I hope you and Patricia find a few yours to enjoy Thanksgiving.

**************
Check out smokin’ hot deals on laptops, desktops and more from
Dell. Shop Deals
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1213345834x1200842686/aol?redir=http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;209513277;31396581;l)







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Re: LIFE Magazine Photos- PFE Reefers

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

It is most assuredly not Bisbee, Arizona. No part of Bisbee is on
anything even remotely resembling flat land. When the streets in
Bisbee were paved the workers didn't know whether they were paving or
plastering. The high school building had four ground-floor
entrances; one each on the 1st, 2nd 3rd and 4th floors.

Gene Green
a frequent visitor to Bisbee.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Is that photo really from Bisbee Arizona? I thought Bisbee was
only a copper mining town. I can't find any information in the
PFE book on an icing plant or large produce facility in Bisbee.
The wide valley with background mountains looks more like Colton
or some other California location... It's not unusual for photos
on web sites to be misidentified.

Tim O'Connor



Courtesy of Bruce Morden from Carpenteria, CA, we have this link
to a
LIFE Magazine photo showing PFE reefers being loaded in Arizona:

http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?imgurl=72941a1fc7cd792c
<http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?imgurl=72941a1fc7cd792c>

Bob Chaparro
Moderator
Citrus Industry Modeling Group
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/citrusmodeling/>

Extremely 'cool' shot (sorry, bad pun). Would these reefers have
been iced BEFORE this loading was
done, or after. I do see the "UNION ICE COMPANY" in the
background.

SGL


Re: Image Of Union Pacific Stock Cars From LIFE Magazine

Tim O'Connor
 

What was at Arco, Idaho that would require coal from the Rio Grande?
A smelter of some kind?

Tim O'Connor

At 11/22/2008 02:54 PM Saturday, you wrote:
Here are some Union Pacific stock cars at Arco, Idaho in April 1949
from a LIFE Magazine photo:
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?q=cattle+source:life&imgurl=eb04c1b554e75305
or
http://tinyurl.com/5lwy3t

Does anyone have more information about these cars?
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, Ca


Re: Image Of Union Pacific Stock Cars From LIFE Magazine

Tim O'Connor
 

Hmmm... that means Model Railroading, 1/1989, pp.49-53 was
mistaken in identifying OSL 37701 as an S-40-6...

Thanks
Tim O'

UP class S-40-4, UP 44810-45749, OSL 36753-37849, OWR&N 40399-40548,
built 1912-1914. These were 36' Harriman-design single deck stock
cars similar to the SP cars modeled by Red Caboose.
Richard Hendrickson


Re: New Modernized R7 Resin Kit

Rhbale@...
 

Thank you Al.


**************
Check out smokin’ hot deals on laptops, desktops
and more from Dell. Shop Deals
(http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100000075x1213345834x1200842686/aol?redir=http://ad.doubleclick.net/clk;209513277;31396581;l)


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