Date   
Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

destron@...
 

Steve,

My guess, to judge from both what the earlier-mentioned C&O employee and
the hints in the photograph suggest, is that the meaning of the entry is
that the car is insulated, and used for transporting latex. It doesn't
mention what sort of insulation it is? I could see it being some sort of
thermal insulation to prevent extremes of temperature?

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

The entry in the UTLX listing is very cryptic, consisting of

INSULATED
LATEX

at the top of the column with the car numbers. There are a number of car
groups with INSULATED, but this series is the only one with LATEX.

Steve Hile
----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 4:29 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars


Frank Valoczy wrote:
> . . . they moved a lot of latices in tank cars (which I assume would
> have been cars like this . . .

I assume this plural is formed by false analogy with "index,
indices?" <g>

> Would the latex lining not react somehow with the latex then loaded
> into the tank?

The statement of "latex lining" could have meant
"latex-resistant lining."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history








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!DSPAM:1291,492f80e789283042225882!

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

Steve and Barb Hile
 

The entry in the UTLX listing is very cryptic, consisting of

INSULATED
LATEX

at the top of the column with the car numbers. There are a number of car groups with INSULATED, but this series is the only one with LATEX.

Steve Hile

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 4:29 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars


Frank Valoczy wrote:
> . . . they moved a lot of latices in tank cars (which I assume would
> have been cars like this . . .

I assume this plural is formed by false analogy with "index,
indices?" <g>

> Would the latex lining not react somehow with the latex then loaded
> into the tank?

The statement of "latex lining" could have meant
"latex-resistant lining."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

ebay Items for Sale

reporterllc
 

I've dusted off the shelf in the storeroom again and put some items on
ebay including freight car detail parts and trucks and couplers.

Check out item number 180309878450 and my other auctions.

Thanks

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Re: UP cabooses

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Cyril Durrenberger asks,

"When did the UP begin to paint their cabooses yellow?"

According to the late Terry Metcalfe in his UP frt car book, "...Begiining in the summer of 1947 and continuing through 1948".

Mike Brock

UP cabooses

Cyril Durrenberger
 

When did the UP begin to paint their cabooses yellow?

Cyril Durrenberger

Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

David North <davenorth@...>
 

I agree with Kurt's suggestion of drinking straws.

While many of the straws on the market are oval shaped I finally found some
at a local coffee shop that were truly round (or so close to it that I
couldn't tell the difference.

They are 8" long x 200 thou dia with a wall thickness of 6 thou, so in HO
about 58' long x 1.5' dia.

The owner gave me two handfuls and that will do for all the pipe loads I'm
ever likely to need.

To "tie them down", I've bought some 1/64 black chart tape from a local art
supply house, to replicate the steel banding used.

Apart from the chart tape my cost was nil.

Cheers

Dave.

Re: Electrical Transformers

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I suspect much of that may be "brand identification", i.e. Westinghouse vs. GE vs. Allis-Chalmers and so forth, but there does seem to be better ability to deal with excess heat these days leading to cleaner casings with less fins and heat exchanger pipes than in the past. Try searching on the OWI or Google/LIFE photo sites for "electrical", "transformer", "substation" and so forth and you ought to be able to find lots of dated photos. Yout typical hydroelectric dam, nuclear plant, or TVA article ought to have good pictures.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce Smith

In looking at the Walthers Northern Power and Light Substation, it looks
like there are a number of transformers that might make interesting loads.
My concern is that the main transformer has relative sharp corners - ie a
very boxy shape. Many older transformers seem to have rounded ends. When
did box shaped transformers come into use?

Electrical Transformers

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

In looking at the Walthers Northern Power and Light Substation, it looks
like there are a number of transformers that might make interesting loads.
My concern is that the main transformer has relative sharp corners - ie a
very boxy shape. Many older transformers seem to have rounded ends. When
did box shaped transformers come into use?

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

Tim O'Connor
 

Lee wrote

Many thanks for the info. Many, many, many, many, many..... Well,
you get the idea. I wonder what caused the multiple posts to the
list? I hope it is not some sort of nasty viral bug.
Nothing on my end. It's a mystery. May be a Comcast hiccup.

Anyway, great info, but can you translate the shorthand with regard to
"RP roof?" I'm not totally versed in roofs.
Sorry that's how I write "Rectangular Panel" roof. I use DP
for "Diagonal Panel".

Also, what is the subject of Ed Hawkin's RMJ article? Is it GM&O
cars, or does it deal with 40' box cars, or is it on AC&F?
From my notes: RMJ 10/1999 pp.43-51 Ed Hawkins covers postwar 10'4"
to 10'8" boxcars with the 4/4 Improved Dreadnaught (rolling pin) ends
-- photos DRGW/ATSF/NP/ERIE/MONON/CNW/IC/CB&Q/AA/A&WP

Tim O'Connor

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

Tim O'Connor
 

Brian

I got 9 copies! Don't ask me... I only sent it once.

Tim O'Connor

At 11/27/2008 01:44 PM Thursday, you wrote:
Did anyone else get 6 copies of Tim's reply?

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

destron@...
 

And it's hard to think of anything made of latex that would be corrosive
and dangerous to put into
an unlined tank car. But then, you're the materials guy, and you have a
better chance of knowing
than I do . . .
If it'd make a difference... the latices in question would probably be
things like unfinished (i.e., uncoagulated) styrene-butadiene or other
synthetic rubbers. The liquid output after the ingredients (styrene and
butadiene for SB rubber, aka GR-S or Buna-S) are co-polymerized (using
other chemicals as catalysts, emulsifiers and retardants) is called a
latex; the latex is then fed into another tank, where it's mixed with
brine and sulphuric acid to make it coagulate into little flakes of
solidified rubber that's then baled and shipped off in 40lb bales (likely
the contents of the UP boxcar I saw in another photo of the Polymer Corp.
plant).

Now, whether this latex described above would be corrosive or otherwise
dangerous to put into an unlined tank car, I don't know... perhaps someone
who understands polymer chemistry a bit more could answer that.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Mark Feddersen wrote:

"I assume your need to constantly make snide remarks is compensation
for manly deficiencies."

As Schuyler noted, this remark is blatantly in violation of the rules. The concept and philosophy of the STMFC is to allow members to freely make comments in opposition to another member's view. That does not mean, however, that the opposing view need be accepted and views in opposition to it are welcome. At no time, however, may personal attacks be levied at any member. I would appreciate it if the members will simply move on...ignoring this comment...which will be removed from the group's archives. Normally I don't comment about a rule violation requiring a jail sentence but, in this case, the temptation to reply to the message requires a public comment.

The sound you might have heard is the sound of the closing of a door in the new wing of Moderate Jail.

My, my...lot of people in the new wing. One guy asked me if Notre Dame was still number one.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner and Head Judge

Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

Donald B. Valentine
 

I'm with you, Rich, but i think there is an easier way than
finding either a vertical boring machine or even a drill press to
reduce the thickenss of the wall to use this sort of material to
depict 1/87th scale pipe. With styrene products this is a very easy
fix, nearly the same with aluminum and only a little less so with
copper, depending on how it is alloyed. Deburring tools can be
purchased quite inexpensively and can be used to ream out the inside
of the ends of whichever material you might use for HO scale pipe.
The sharper the angle of the deburring tool, the better it will work
for this purpose. Once this is done and the "pipe" is painted in
realistic colors one will have to look hard to realize the walls of
the "pipe" are thicker than they appear to be at their ends.

I have a couple of these deburrers on my reloading bench to
be certain the inside of rifle cases are properly deburred and
chamfered before reloading them. Bullets seat a lot easier in cases
that have been trimmed to the proper length only after the inside of
their necks have been chamfered with such a tool. They are a hand
tool that is simple to use. Any machinist can help you locate one
or they can be found under the "reloading tools" part of
eBay's "Sporting" section, often for very little money.

Hope this helps,
Don Valentine



--- In STMFC@..., SUVCWORR@... wrote:


Dean:

For larger diameter pipe (24 - 36") I have used 1/4" or 3/8"
copper tubing.
Cut it to length then use a vertical boring machine or a drill
press to thin
the walls to a depth of 1/4 inch or so. This give a visually thin
wall but
maintains the overall integrity of the pipe. Paint to match the
color of the
company manufacturing the pipe -- US steel black, J&L steel
tuscan, Armco
steel dk blue, anything from American Bridge was orange although
that was
mostly structural steel for bridges. Not sure the correct color
for Bethlehem
steel pipe. Also adds some weight to the gon. Brass or aluminum
tubing would
work just as well.

Rich Orr

In a message dated 11/27/2008 11:02:50 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
1payne1@... writes:

I've got two pending resin orders, but I've noticed that I've got a
lot of empty gons. The W&LE served the South Lorain pipe works, so
I've decided to model a bunch of pipe loads. I can't afford to
buy
commercial loads for all these without having to reduce my resin
order, so...
Are there any especially good sources for "pipe"? I've got a
bunch of
coffee stirrers, of course, but I don't know if there is something
better. (Mine are a scale 35' 8" or so, 10" approx. OD) I seem to
remember seeing something about someone who found a source of
especially nice stirrers, but don't remember the source.
The pipe load from Life-Like (on sale at Walthers) looks too
thick-walled for my tastes (and a little too "plastic-ey").

Dean Payne


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Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Frank Valoczy wrote:

Would the latex lining not react somehow with the latex then loaded
into the tank?
The statement of "latex lining" could have meant
"latex-resistant lining."

Tony Thompson, Editor
No, Tony, there is no way that the term "Latex Lining" could possibly be construed to mean "Latex
resistant lining." If it meant that, it would SAY: "Latex Resistant Lining."

And it's hard to think of anything made of latex that would be corrosive and dangerous to put into
an unlined tank car. But then, you're the materials guy, and you have a better chance of knowing
than I do . . .

SGL

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: feddersenmark


I assume your need to constantly make snide remarks is compensation
for manly deficiencies.

Completely uncalled for. And against list rules. 1) No slanders against other members. 2) no
unsigned messages (unless your name appears in the "From" line, as mine does.

A apology is called for.

SGL

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Lee Gautreaux wrote:
Anyway, great info, but can you translate the shorthand with regard to
"RP roof?" I'm not totally versed in roofs.
Rectangular Panel, the predecessor to the diagonal-panel roof.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

Lee Gautreaux
 

Tim,

Many thanks for the info. Many, many, many, many, many..... Well,
you get the idea. I wonder what caused the multiple posts to the
list? I hope it is not some sort of nasty viral bug.

Anyway, great info, but can you translate the shorthand with regard to
"RP roof?" I'm not totally versed in roofs.

Also, what is the subject of Ed Hawkin's RMJ article? Is it GM&O
cars, or does it deal with 40' box cars, or is it on AC&F?

By the way, my GM&O pages are in the beginning stages at the following:

http://www.railgoat.railfan.net/other_cars/gmo_cars/

Again, many, many thanks,

Lee A. Gautreaux - The tryptophan-filled RailGoat
http://www.railgoat.railfan.net/


Lee

from Ed Hawkin's data in RMJ 10/1999 --

GM&O series 21000-21999 blt 1947 ACF lot 3057
YSD-2A doors 1st 750, 7p SUP next 250
GM&O series 22000-22419 blt 1947 ACF lot 3141
YSD-2A doors

YSD-2A: 6/6/5 Youngstown (counting from top down)

all cars: 10p rivet 4/4 IDE RP roof 7-rung ladders
brake? running board? trucks?

Model Railroading, 4/1989 has a photo of GM&O #21690

A partial photo of GM&O #21365 shows black ends, pole pockets

Tim O'Connor



I am trying to determine the origin of the entire series GM&O
21000-22419. Ed Kaminski has the group GM&O 22000-22419 blt by AC&F
(lot #3141) in 12/1947. However, the ORER's all list them lumped
together with the previous 1000 cars. Can somebody provide builder
info on GM&O 21000-21999?

Thanks,

Lee A. Gautreaux - The RailGoat
http://www.railgoat.railfan.net/

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

destron@...
 

Frank Valoczy wrote:
. . . they moved a lot of latices in tank cars (which I assume would
have been cars like this . . .
I assume this plural is formed by false analogy with "index,
indices?" <g>
This is the plural I have fairly consistently found in the relevant
technical literature that I have consulted. As to its origin, I don't
know, I've worked mostly with Finno-Ugric languages, not Romance and
Germanic ones. ;) (Interestingly enough, the spellchecker says
"Finno-Ugric" is misspelt, but "latices" is not.)


Would the latex lining not react somehow with the latex then loaded
into the tank?
The statement of "latex lining" could have meant
"latex-resistant lining."
That would make sense. What would be used for such a lining? I'd guess not
glass, but perhaps some particular plastic?

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

armprem
 

You can have some of mine.<G>Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 3:53 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] GM&O 21000-22419


>I haven't gotten any!
>
> Jim Brewer
> Glenwood MD
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Anthony Thompson
> To: STMFC@...
> Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 2:56 PM
> Subject: Re: [STMFC] GM&O 21000-22419
>
>
> Brian J Carlson wrote:
> > Did anyone else get 6 copies of Tim's reply?
>
> Yes, and they're still coming--I'm up to eight. Tim, don't hold down
> the send key <g>.
>
> Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
> 2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
> (510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
> Publishers of books on railroad history
>
>
>
>
>
> >
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.552 / Virus Database: 270.9.10/1815 - Release Date: 11/27/2008 9:02 AM
>
>


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

armprem
 

Six?I recieved Nine.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian J Carlson" <brian@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 1:44 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] GM&O 21000-22419


> Did anyone else get 6 copies of Tim's reply?
>
> Brian J Carlson P.E.
> Cheektowaga NY
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.552 / Virus Database: 270.9.10/1815 - Release Date: 11/27/2008 9:02 AM
>
>


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