Date   
Rivets

Ed Schleyer
 

During the early 1900's, the PRR used a rivet that went into a 13/16"
hole. Does anyone know what size the Rivet was, or is?
Of all the drawings of the "sills" that I have had a chance to see,
there is NO reference to size of rivet. By 1950's standards, the rivet
would be 1/32" smaller than the hole. Doesn't seem that there would be
that many nonstandard rivets made.
Ed Schleyer

Extreme Trains this Tuesday on the History Channel

lnbill <bwelch@...>
 

I note that on the History Channel's series "Extreme Trains" that next
Tuesday's episode features a contemporary reefer train. The
description says it also covers the competition between truck and
trains in the 1950's. These histroical retrospective often feature
interesting vintage footage.

By the mid-1930's Fruit Growers Express was complaining about
competion from trucks as they were not regulated and could charge
whatever they wanted to. A pair of drivers could have a load to NYC in
two days and could charge a premium because their load was several
days fresher.

The show aires at 10 PM EST with reruns throughout the week.

Bill Welch

Re: Norfolk Southern boxcar model - was Norfolk Southern color

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

Chuck,

Many thanks.

Jim

----- Original Message -----
From: RUTLANDRS@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, November 28, 2008 9:19 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Norfolk Southern boxcar model - was Norfolk Southern color


Jim,
I will forward this to them.
Chuck Hladik


In a message dated 11/27/2008 10:25:17 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jfbrewer@... writes:

Chuck,

Any further info on this model? I'd probably order one; I checked the MER,
NMRA web site but didn't see it listed there. Thanks.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: _RUTLANDRS@... (mailto:RUTLANDRS@...)
To: _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...)
Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2008 11:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Norfolk Southern color

Lou,
I'm forwarding this to the NMRA Division near Raleigh, N.C. They just
had a run made of an original NS boxcar.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 11/26/2008 9:45:04 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
_octoraro1@... (mailto:octoraro1@...) writes:

__http://images.http://images.<Whttp://imagehttp://imagehttp://ima&<WBR>imgurl
=_
(http://images.http//imaghttp://imagehttp://imagehttp://imaghttp&imgurl=imgur)
l=<WBR>4617_
(_http://images.http://imaghttp://imagehttp://imagehttp://imaghttp&imgurl=imgu
rl=<WBR>4617_
(http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?q=freight+car+source:life&imgurl=4617f3a9036aa1cd) ) popped up among the Life photos. This is a
terrific resource.

--- On Sat, 10/4/08, Louis C. Whiteley <__octoraro1@...
(mailto:_octoraro1@...) _
(mailto:_octoraro1@... (mailto:octoraro1@...) ) > wrote:

From: Louis C. Whiteley <__octoraro1@...
(mailto:_octoraro1@...) _
(mailto:_octoraro1@... (mailto:octoraro1@...) ) >
Subject: [STMFC] Norfolk Southern color
To: __STMFC@... (mailto:_STMFC@...) _
(mailto:_STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) )
Date: Saturday, October 4, 2008, 10:21 AM

Can anyone suggest appropriate colors for the Norfolk Southern XM-3
(25500-series, Magor, 1942) and XM-5 (27000-series, P-S, 1947) boxcars
as delivered? I appreciate any leads -- formula, color photo source,
or "similar to . . ."?

Thank you.

Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ



************************<WBR>**Life should be easier. So should your homep
AOL.com.
(_http://www.aol.http://www.http:/&icid=icid=<WBR>aolc&<WBR>ncid=emlcnt<WBR>nc
id_
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002) )





**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)

Re: Electrical Transformers

Mark
 

Good Day, Bruce.

Don mentioned Stewart, Selley has some transformers too.

http://bowser-trains.com/hoother/selley/Selley%20Drawings%20HO.pdf

Sincerely, Mark Morgan

--- On Fri, 11/28/08, Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...> wrote:
From: Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Electrical Transformers
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, November 28, 2008, 7:31 AM











I, too, wonder about "brand identification" here, Bruce, but do

not seem to recall large transformers with square ends until into the

1960's. It may be a question of cheaper to fabricate just as it has

been with locomotive housing. I wonder, however, if you might have

overlooked the Stewart Products cast metal transformers with the

rounded ends. These may no longer be available but were offered for

years and made great loads for deep well center flat cars. One would

make a great pattern for additional castings in resin.



Take care, Don Valentine



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@... > wrote:

Folks,
In looking at the Walthers Northern Power and Light Substation, it
looks

like there are a number of transformers that might make interesting
loads.

My concern is that the main transformer has relative sharp
corners - ie a

very boxy shape. Many older transformers seem to have rounded
ends. When

did box shaped transformers come into use?
Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL




























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: UP A-50-12 (converted to bunk car) about to be scrapped

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Hi Folks

A UP A-50-12 (converted to bunk car) sitting in Laramie is about to be
scrapped. It was built by Ralston Steel Car Company in 1929, one of
the series 152001-152500. As far as I can tell it is still on its
original trucks.

Are there any particular photos or measurements anyone wants before the
car is gone forever? If so, contact me off list. The car is in
excellent shape.

Best wishes,
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming
Our leader Mr Brock was quite restrained in his response, but since you likely have a digital
camera, and digital images take virtually (snicker) no space, and could be put on a CD if they
challenge your hard drive capacity, I'd suggest you head out and take as many images as your
patience will stand. Underbody images would, as Mike said, be very useful, but all kinds of details
should be covered because once this is gone, it won't be possible to document it then. Many of us
take the standard 3/4 views, and call it done, but when you start to model something, there is
always< ONE more view that you wish had been taken.
Case in point: I am building the shake-n-take model Greg Martin organized, but I cannot find a view
that shows what kind of bracket was used to support the air hose. It's obscured by the coupler in
the one truly worthwhile photo I have to work with.

SGL

Re: UP A-50-12 (converted to bunk car) about to be scrapped

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Larry Ostresh writes:

"A UP A-50-12 (converted to bunk car) sitting in Laramie is about to be
scrapped. It was built by Ralston Steel Car Company in 1929, one of
the series 152001-152500. As far as I can tell it is still on its
original trucks.

Are there any particular photos or measurements anyone wants before the
car is gone forever? If so, contact me off list. The car is in
excellent shape."

It might be useful to have photos of the car in general but, in particular, the underbody details might be useful.

Mike Brock
Modeling Laramie in 1953

UP A-50-12 (converted to bunk car) about to be scrapped

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Hi Folks

A UP A-50-12 (converted to bunk car) sitting in Laramie is about to be
scrapped. It was built by Ralston Steel Car Company in 1929, one of
the series 152001-152500. As far as I can tell it is still on its
original trucks.

Are there any particular photos or measurements anyone wants before the
car is gone forever? If so, contact me off list. The car is in
excellent shape.

Best wishes,
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming

Re: Electrical Transformers

Donald B. Valentine
 

I, too, wonder about "brand identification" here, Bruce, but do
not seem to recall large transformers with square ends until into the
1960's. It may be a question of cheaper to fabricate just as it has
been with locomotive housing. I wonder, however, if you might have
overlooked the Stewart Products cast metal transformers with the
rounded ends. These may no longer be available but were offered for
years and made great loads for deep well center flat cars. One would
make a great pattern for additional castings in resin.

Take care, Don Valentine

--- In STMFC@..., "Bruce Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Folks,

In looking at the Walthers Northern Power and Light Substation, it
looks
like there are a number of transformers that might make interesting
loads.
My concern is that the main transformer has relative sharp
corners - ie a
very boxy shape. Many older transformers seem to have rounded
ends. When
did box shaped transformers come into use?

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

Re: Norfolk Southern boxcar model - was Norfolk Southern color

Charles Hladik
 

Jim,
I will forward this to them.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 11/27/2008 10:25:17 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jfbrewer@... writes:




Chuck,

Any further info on this model? I'd probably order one; I checked the MER,
NMRA web site but didn't see it listed there. Thanks.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: _RUTLANDRS@... (mailto:RUTLANDRS@...)
To: _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...)
Sent: Wednesday, November 26, 2008 11:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Norfolk Southern color

Lou,
I'm forwarding this to the NMRA Division near Raleigh, N.C. They just
had a run made of an original NS boxcar.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 11/26/2008 9:45:04 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
_octoraro1@... (mailto:octoraro1@...) writes:

__http://images.http://images.<Whttp://imagehttp://imagehttp://ima&<WBR>imgurl
=_
(http://images.http//imaghttp://imagehttp://imagehttp://imaghttp&imgurl=imgur)
l=<WBR>4617_
(_http://images.http://imaghttp://imagehttp://imagehttp://imaghttp&imgurl=imgu
rl=<WBR>4617_
(http://images.google.com/hosted/life/l?q=freight+car+source:life&imgurl=4617f3a9036aa1cd) ) popped up among the Life photos. This is a
terrific resource.

--- On Sat, 10/4/08, Louis C. Whiteley <__octoraro1@...
(mailto:_octoraro1@...) _
(mailto:_octoraro1@... (mailto:octoraro1@...) ) > wrote:

From: Louis C. Whiteley <__octoraro1@...
(mailto:_octoraro1@...) _
(mailto:_octoraro1@... (mailto:octoraro1@...) ) >
Subject: [STMFC] Norfolk Southern color
To: __STMFC@... (mailto:_STMFC@...) _
(mailto:_STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) )
Date: Saturday, October 4, 2008, 10:21 AM

Can anyone suggest appropriate colors for the Norfolk Southern XM-3
(25500-series, Magor, 1942) and XM-5 (27000-series, P-S, 1947) boxcars
as delivered? I appreciate any leads -- formula, color photo source,
or "similar to . . ."?

Thank you.

Lou Whiteley
Lawrenceville, NJ

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

************************<WBR>**Life should be easier. So should your homep
AOL.com.
(_http://www.aol.http://www.http:/&icid=icid=<WBR>aolc&<WBR>ncid=emlcnt<WBR>nc
id_
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002) )

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




**************Life should be easier. So should your homepage. Try the NEW
AOL.com.
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000002)

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

destron@...
 

Steve,

My guess, to judge from both what the earlier-mentioned C&O employee and
the hints in the photograph suggest, is that the meaning of the entry is
that the car is insulated, and used for transporting latex. It doesn't
mention what sort of insulation it is? I could see it being some sort of
thermal insulation to prevent extremes of temperature?

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

The entry in the UTLX listing is very cryptic, consisting of

INSULATED
LATEX

at the top of the column with the car numbers. There are a number of car
groups with INSULATED, but this series is the only one with LATEX.

Steve Hile
----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 4:29 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars


Frank Valoczy wrote:
> . . . they moved a lot of latices in tank cars (which I assume would
> have been cars like this . . .

I assume this plural is formed by false analogy with "index,
indices?" <g>

> Would the latex lining not react somehow with the latex then loaded
> into the tank?

The statement of "latex lining" could have meant
"latex-resistant lining."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history








------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




!DSPAM:1291,492f80e789283042225882!

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

Steve and Barb Hile
 

The entry in the UTLX listing is very cryptic, consisting of

INSULATED
LATEX

at the top of the column with the car numbers. There are a number of car groups with INSULATED, but this series is the only one with LATEX.

Steve Hile

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2008 4:29 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars


Frank Valoczy wrote:
> . . . they moved a lot of latices in tank cars (which I assume would
> have been cars like this . . .

I assume this plural is formed by false analogy with "index,
indices?" <g>

> Would the latex lining not react somehow with the latex then loaded
> into the tank?

The statement of "latex lining" could have meant
"latex-resistant lining."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

ebay Items for Sale

reporterllc
 

I've dusted off the shelf in the storeroom again and put some items on
ebay including freight car detail parts and trucks and couplers.

Check out item number 180309878450 and my other auctions.

Thanks

Victor Baird
Fort Wayne, Indiana

Re: UP cabooses

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Cyril Durrenberger asks,

"When did the UP begin to paint their cabooses yellow?"

According to the late Terry Metcalfe in his UP frt car book, "...Begiining in the summer of 1947 and continuing through 1948".

Mike Brock

UP cabooses

Cyril Durrenberger
 

When did the UP begin to paint their cabooses yellow?

Cyril Durrenberger

Re: Pipe loads on the cheap

David North <davenorth@...>
 

I agree with Kurt's suggestion of drinking straws.

While many of the straws on the market are oval shaped I finally found some
at a local coffee shop that were truly round (or so close to it that I
couldn't tell the difference.

They are 8" long x 200 thou dia with a wall thickness of 6 thou, so in HO
about 58' long x 1.5' dia.

The owner gave me two handfuls and that will do for all the pipe loads I'm
ever likely to need.

To "tie them down", I've bought some 1/64 black chart tape from a local art
supply house, to replicate the steel banding used.

Apart from the chart tape my cost was nil.

Cheers

Dave.

Re: Electrical Transformers

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I suspect much of that may be "brand identification", i.e. Westinghouse vs. GE vs. Allis-Chalmers and so forth, but there does seem to be better ability to deal with excess heat these days leading to cleaner casings with less fins and heat exchanger pipes than in the past. Try searching on the OWI or Google/LIFE photo sites for "electrical", "transformer", "substation" and so forth and you ought to be able to find lots of dated photos. Yout typical hydroelectric dam, nuclear plant, or TVA article ought to have good pictures.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce Smith

In looking at the Walthers Northern Power and Light Substation, it looks
like there are a number of transformers that might make interesting loads.
My concern is that the main transformer has relative sharp corners - ie a
very boxy shape. Many older transformers seem to have rounded ends. When
did box shaped transformers come into use?

Electrical Transformers

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

In looking at the Walthers Northern Power and Light Substation, it looks
like there are a number of transformers that might make interesting loads.
My concern is that the main transformer has relative sharp corners - ie a
very boxy shape. Many older transformers seem to have rounded ends. When
did box shaped transformers come into use?

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

Tim O'Connor
 

Lee wrote

Many thanks for the info. Many, many, many, many, many..... Well,
you get the idea. I wonder what caused the multiple posts to the
list? I hope it is not some sort of nasty viral bug.
Nothing on my end. It's a mystery. May be a Comcast hiccup.

Anyway, great info, but can you translate the shorthand with regard to
"RP roof?" I'm not totally versed in roofs.
Sorry that's how I write "Rectangular Panel" roof. I use DP
for "Diagonal Panel".

Also, what is the subject of Ed Hawkin's RMJ article? Is it GM&O
cars, or does it deal with 40' box cars, or is it on AC&F?
From my notes: RMJ 10/1999 pp.43-51 Ed Hawkins covers postwar 10'4"
to 10'8" boxcars with the 4/4 Improved Dreadnaught (rolling pin) ends
-- photos DRGW/ATSF/NP/ERIE/MONON/CNW/IC/CB&Q/AA/A&WP

Tim O'Connor

Re: GM&O 21000-22419

Tim O'Connor
 

Brian

I got 9 copies! Don't ask me... I only sent it once.

Tim O'Connor

At 11/27/2008 01:44 PM Thursday, you wrote:
Did anyone else get 6 copies of Tim's reply?

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

Re: Polymer Corp., Ltd / Polysar tank cars

destron@...
 

And it's hard to think of anything made of latex that would be corrosive
and dangerous to put into
an unlined tank car. But then, you're the materials guy, and you have a
better chance of knowing
than I do . . .
If it'd make a difference... the latices in question would probably be
things like unfinished (i.e., uncoagulated) styrene-butadiene or other
synthetic rubbers. The liquid output after the ingredients (styrene and
butadiene for SB rubber, aka GR-S or Buna-S) are co-polymerized (using
other chemicals as catalysts, emulsifiers and retardants) is called a
latex; the latex is then fed into another tank, where it's mixed with
brine and sulphuric acid to make it coagulate into little flakes of
solidified rubber that's then baled and shipped off in 40lb bales (likely
the contents of the UP boxcar I saw in another photo of the Polymer Corp.
plant).

Now, whether this latex described above would be corrosive or otherwise
dangerous to put into an unlined tank car, I don't know... perhaps someone
who understands polymer chemistry a bit more could answer that.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC