Date   

Re: Carbody Window Screens

Schuyler Larrabee
 

In today's modeling world, there may be better options, but . . . I have made screens and grills
using silk screen screening (SSS). SSS is available in a large variety of mesh sizes and also a
variety of thread sizes. I cannot remember where I got this stuff, and a half yard of it will
supply you forever. I made the grills and screens by making a frame of styrene, fastening (tape)
down a small piece of the screen (much larger than the grill(s) but small compared to the overall
supply, maybe 4" x 4". I taped it to a hard-face cardboard, like some Strathmore or something. I
think I used the inside of a Twinings teabag box. then put the styrene frame down on the screen
with some weight on it, not a lot, just enough to press it down flat, and then flooded the surface
with liquid cement, and then left it alone for a day. This softens the face of the frame and the
weight pushes it down into the screen and tight to the face of the cardboard. After it was dry, I
lifted it from the cardboard (the first time I did this was not hard faced board and that was a
challenge). I then guillotined the screen from the edges of the frame.

Like I said, there may be better techniques now . . .

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of chapbob@aol.com
Sent: Sunday, December 07, 2008 4:55 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Carbody Window Screens

Does anyone have a favorite product to recommend for HO scale window screens
as found on cabooses, camp cars, etc.?

What I'm looking for is a fine mesh, but not so fine as to totally hide the
window behind it.

Thanks!
Bob Chapman


Re: Carbody Window Screens

Ed Walters
 

Bruce Smith suggested screen printing screen to me (it is available
in some very fine meshes).

Ed
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, chapbob@... wrote:

Does anyone have a favorite product to recommend for HO scale
window screens
as found on cabooses, camp cars, etc.?

What I'm looking for is a fine mesh, but not so fine as to totally
hide the
window behind it.

Thanks!
Bob Chapman
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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Rutland Car Shops MDT reefer kit

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

Steve, a little Googling took me to the original Rutland Car Shops site
http://users.rcn.com/jimdu4/carshops.htm which told me that yes it is a
resin kit. And that it is (or was in 2000) manufactured by Sylvan Scale
Models. Sylvan http://www.isp.on.ca/sylvan/ makes a quality product so the
Bethlehem/Rutland product should be OK. I was tempted to order one myself
but realized they were undoubtedly gone by my late '50s timeframe and
although it's certainly possible, it's unlikely they made to the Northwest.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of S
hed
Sent: Sunday, December 07, 2008 9:06 AM
To: stmfc@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: The Atlas model of Cudahy meat reefers


As a FYI to the group, Bethlehem Car Works offers a MDT 40' Reefer with the
8-hinges for sale. Here is the web link:

http://www.bethlehemcarworks.com/Products/Rutland_Car_Shops/Rolling_Stock/RC
S-MDT.html

It is supposed to be a car based on the MDT Co's blue prints and from the
1919 Car Builder's Encyclopedia. And it is supposed to represent the NYC
series 155000 to 156999 and MC series 16000 to 16249 built between 1913 and
1917.


Re: Car Types for Team Tracks

Frank Greene
 

gary laakso wrote:
I have been going through the January 1, 1961 Great Northern Railway Industrial Guide for points served by it and other railroads. The scope of team track usage amazes me since it covers from coffins to Edsels to Hamms beer to paving machinery and on and on. Here are the uses that i am not sure what type of freight car would be used (no, i am not listing pipe, threaded or not):

8- .../tobacco; refrigerators?

Box cars, both for leaf tobacco (usually shipped in hogsheads) and the finished product (e.g., cigarettes, snuff, etc.).

--

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN


Re: Reciprocal switching

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, as usual you're confusing your sarcasm with insight. My point was that shippers cannot invent routes -- they can
only choose routes available on the tariff. If you dispute that, then I've got a bridge or two for you.
I understand your point, and intended no dispute of it; but you seem to believe it was hard to find routings in the tariffs. As for me, i find it hard to believe that a shipper served by CNW and RI could not get to any major and probably about any minor destination via either road. You can keep your bridges.

How is railroad A's access to railroad B customers reciprocal?
Because railroad B got access to railroad A's customers too. Doesn't seem a subtle point to me.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Reciprocal switching

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

I know that some denizens of this group are predisposed to consider anything found on the internet as complete bullsh_t, but I think this has some validity:

http://www.uprr.com/customers/shortline/attachments/prior_uprsc.pdf

See definition on page 5.

KL


Re: Reciprocal switching

Tim O'Connor
 

I think you're assigning the "reciprocal" word to the wrong part
of the story. The fees aren't reciprocal, the switching privilege is.
And if you think the shipper couldn�t find a tariffed route via major
railroads, I've got a bridge you might like to own.
Tony Thompson
Tony, as usual you're confusing your sarcasm with insight.
My point was that shippers cannot invent routes -- they can
only choose routes available on the tariff. If you dispute
that, then I've got a bridge or two for you.

How is railroad A's access to railroad B customers reciprocal?
I'm not at all confused about the meaning of the word. If there
is a reciprocal part to this story, no one has presented it yet.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Reciprocal switching

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Perhaps the following is another case of reciprocal switching that is
a bit different from that note in the original inquiry.

In Memphis, TN, there is an industrial district called President's
Island which is a mass of land that was left behind by a large meander
of the Mississippi River. This district was switched in turn by the
railroads that served the city. That is, the SLSF would switch the
district for four months, then the Southern for four months, then the
IC for four months. Then the cycle would replay itself. A shipper
could choose the routes available in the tariff book that they desired
without regard of the switching railroad. The railroad switching the
island at any given time acted more like a terminal switching railroad
during its time on the island. I do not have any idea of how the
railroads split the switching fees, if there were any.

Not sure if this is any help at all in this discussion, but that is
what I would name reciprocal switching.

Cheers,
-- Bill Keene

On Dec 7, 2008, at 9:59 AM, Tim O'Connor wrote:


You got it, Gene.

What is meant by the term "reciprocal switching?"

I got the term off a list of industries in towns along the CGW. The
list apparently includes industries located along any of the other
RRs
in the town. Some are marked reciprocal switching - yes and some
reciprocal switching - no.

Does it mean that RR A could spot a car on the industry's siding
located along RR B?

Gene Green


Re: Reciprocal switching

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
So where is the reciprocity?
I think you're assigning the "reciprocal" word to the wrong part
of the story. The fees aren't reciprocal, the switching privilege is.
And if you think the shipper couldn’t find a tariffed route via major
railroads, I've got a bridge you might like to own.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: C&BT Santa Fe reefer question

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

According to a chart I have from Cc7BT, it's an Rr-35. The C1 just indicates
which C&BT body it is.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Sunday, December 07, 2008 10:41 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] C&BT Santa Fe reefer question

I've got C&BT Shops kit R700, with 6' plug door,
4/4 ends, Preco fan plate on the side -- C&BT calls
this version "C1" whatever that means. The kits were
produced with the help of the SFMO and included is a
cross reference but -- I can't figure out exactly
which car is represented by this kit.

Looking through the Santa Fe reefers book, this body
looks very similar to some Rr-34, Rr-35 and Rr-40 cars
but none of the photos shows the exact combination of
ends and fan plate and door gussets.

So... any one know exactly what this kit represents?

Tim O'Connor


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Reciprocal switching

Tim O'Connor
 

First of all, the railroad isn't the instigator, it's the
shipper, which can choose either road which serves it. Second, I don't
see why you think this is a "short haul," because the load will
probably go onward on whichever road is the originating road--at least
I think that would be the shipper's logic.
Tony Thompson
Yes, but as you know, the shipper can only choose a route that
is part of the published tariff. So it still begs the question
of why the owner of the track would accept a simple fee instead
of a generous percentage of the entire bill. The incentive for
the track owner is to move the car to the furthest point that
it can before turning it over to someone else. That is typically
how it would work on a tariff, and anything else is a "short haul".
So where is the reciprocity?

Tim O'Connor


The SHAKE N TAKE clinic is full.

Greg Martin
 

Guys,
The list is now complete for the online pre registration for the Shake N
Take clinic. We'll have a just few slots left for those registering at the door
with no Internet access. I have also added for slots for what Al Brown
suggests as "Instruction Only" which will give you access to a handout for the
modeling of the kit that I provide for the folks listed below. So let me get this
out to you all and know that if you would like to add yourself under
"Instruction Only".
Also let me correct the time for the clinic: Friday January 09, 2009 at 3:30
PM in the Seahorse & Starfish Roo.

Here's the current list"

1.) Armend Premo
2.) Dr. Denny Anspach
3.) Tony Thompson
4.) Mont Switzer
5.) Schuyler Larrabee
6.) John Greedy
7.) William Bell
8.) Jeff Alley
9.) Mike Brock (if we can get him to stand still for 5 minutes)
10.) Gary Laakso
11.) Roger Hinman
13.) Richard Hendrickson
14.) Paul Lyons
15.) Bruce Smith
16.) Brian Carlson
17.) Jerry Glow
18.) John G Wheeler
19.) Dick Berry
20.) Lindsay Raley
21.) John Golden
22.) Owne Thorne
23.) Chirs Zygmont
24.) Ted Cullota
25.) Bill MCCoy
26.) Paul Bizier
27.) John Burroughs

INSTRUCTION ONLY:
1.) Al Brown
2.)
3.)
4.)
Thanks,
Greg Martin


.



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Re: Reciprocal switching

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
. . . Why would a railroad short haul itself by giving another railroad the right to bill cars to its customers in return for a fee, unless that railroad in turn got the same deal for the customers of the other railroad?
First of all, the railroad isn't the instigator, it's the shipper, which can choose either road which serves it. Second, I don't see why you think this is a "short haul," because the load will probably go onward on whichever road is the originating road--at least I think that would be the shipper's logic.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Car Types for Team Tracks

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

gary laakso wrote:
The scope of team track usage amazes me . . .
6- vitamins; refrigerator cars?
8- candy/tobacco; refrigerators?
9- potato chips (its listed at multiple locations) refrigerators?
In the early 1950s, "refrigerator" would be a good guess, but by 1960 (your document is 1961) these would have been insulated box cars. The only reason to use reefers earlier was for the insulation--they would not have been iced. And it's very possible that soft drinks (your no. 5) would fall into the same category.
For "steel products," as these could include castings, etc. I think you should include box cars.
"Fireworks" of course were shipped in the Lionel exploding box car. <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Reciprocal switching

Tim O'Connor
 

Dennis

I guess usage has changed then. It sounds to me like you
are describing what is now called "haulage rights" (versus
trackage rights). The word "reciprocal" implies that each
side gets something in return for giving something. Why
would a railroad short haul itself by giving another railroad
the right to bill cars to its customers in return for a fee,
unless that railroad in turn got the same deal for the
customers of the other railroad? A different solution is a
joint switching district. Many people don't realize that
Conrail still exists, in the form of an NS-CSXT jointly owned
operation.

Tim O'Connor

Does it mean that RR A could spot a car on the industry's siding
located along RR B?

Gene Green
No. As I understand it, either railroad could be the originating or
terminating road, the same as if the industry was physically on their
own rails. The road that actually switched the industry received a
flat fee for the service.

From a modeler's standpoint, it does very little to the visible
operations; it basically involved shuffling the paperwork in a
different fashion. The only noticeable difference is that if an
industry was on the MILW but open to the C&NW via reciprocal
switching, if the car was billed as originating on the C&NW, that road
was expected to supply the Mty.
Dennis


C&BT Santa Fe reefer question

Tim O'Connor
 

I've got C&BT Shops kit R700, with 6' plug door,
4/4 ends, Preco fan plate on the side -- C&BT calls
this version "C1" whatever that means. The kits were
produced with the help of the SFMO and included is a
cross reference but -- I can't figure out exactly
which car is represented by this kit.

Looking through the Santa Fe reefers book, this body
looks very similar to some Rr-34, Rr-35 and Rr-40 cars
but none of the photos shows the exact combination of
ends and fan plate and door gussets.

So... any one know exactly what this kit represents?

Tim O'Connor


Re: Car Types for Team Tracks

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: gary laakso

I think you are OK with the first 9, with the proviso that some of the refrigerator items might have gone by insulated boxcar or bunkerless reefer rather than ice reefers.

10- ferns , as in plants ? no idea

Express, RB, or XMI?

11- fireworks? no clue and for Mike Brock..

Either XM or REA car? I think that REA got stuck with hauling hazardous materials that the RRs wouldn't take, due to the stipulations of their monopoly. If the quantity and explosive classification was below the ICC/BoE limits, they probably would have been normal LCL freight.

12- jailhouse supplies? brig cars?

This probably refers to prefabricated doors, cell bars, and maybe toilets. These would be regular XM, I think.

KL


Interlocker Car

Gary Roe
 

I realize this question is coming from an era way before most of us model; but I ran across something I had never heard of before, and thought I'd run it past you all.

In looking at a listing of freight car equipment for the Wabash Railroad from 1914, back in the back under Company Service Cars, there is a listing for 35 "Interlocker Cars". There are no dimensions or any other data associated with the listing. What is an Interlocker Car, and/or what it is used for?

gary roe
quincy, illinois


Re: Reciprocal switching

Tim O'Connor
 

You got it, Gene.

What is meant by the term "reciprocal switching?"

I got the term off a list of industries in towns along the CGW. The
list apparently includes industries located along any of the other RRs
in the town. Some are marked reciprocal switching - yes and some
reciprocal switching - no.

Does it mean that RR A could spot a car on the industry's siding
located along RR B?

Gene Green


Re: Reciprocal switching

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

What is meant by the term "reciprocal switching?"

I got the term off a list of industries in towns along the CGW. The
list apparently includes industries located along any of the other RRs
in the town. Some are marked reciprocal switching - yes and some
reciprocal switching - no.

Does it mean that RR A could spot a car on the industry's siding
located along RR B?

Gene Green
No. As I understand it, either railroad could be the originating or
terminating road, the same as if the industry was physically on their
own rails. The road that actually switched the industry received a
flat fee for the service.

From a modeler's standpoint, it does very little to the visible
operations; it basically involved shuffling the paperwork in a
different fashion. The only noticeable difference is that if an
industry was on the MILW but open to the C&NW via reciprocal
switching, if the car was billed as originating on the C&NW, that road
was expected to supply the Mty.

Dennis

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