Date   

Re: Carbody Window Screens

jerryglow2
 

I used clear plastic and sanded it lightly at a 90 degree angle for
my caboose. see:
<http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/MP_shortBW.jpg>
The model is too new for this forum but the method is valid.
I had to use something VERY thin to look like they were in the
sliding tracks which I did with decal stripes

Jerry Glow


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...> wrote:

Hi Bob,

This is a subject of great interest to me, as all Santa Fe way cars
(cabooses) have window screens, and often screen doors too. The
product I really like is a fine mesh (nylon or some other synthetic)
sold by American Models Builders in its Laserkit line. Kit no. 341
includes sash and door frames to fit the Athearn Santa Fe caboose.
Laserkit has other screen window and door kits using the same
material, but I don't know if it sells the mesh separately. Sunshine
Models has included the same or a similar material in some of its
kits, so it must be available somewhere else.

So long,

Andy


Re: Reciprocal switching

Frank Greene
 

Mike Brock wrote:
So...relax. No one is taking shots at anyone in particular...unless maybe at me...and I'm used to it because I have a big target on my back.

Mike Brock

That sure is easy to say, when you have the keys to moderator jail in your pocket. :-D

--

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN


Re: Box car running boards...painted or not?

Bob McCarthy
 

Howdy!
 
     The discussion of paint on running boards is interesting to me because I have spent many years in the military maintaining prime movers to haul tanks, artillery and other large armored vehicles.
 
     The American Military always paints decking to keep down rot..  As an example in 1980, I personally was involved in buying thousands of feet of replacement decking on these trailers.  Having a background in woodworking and experience with rot, we specified in our request for proposal rot resistant wood.  Actually, I expected White Oak to be offered, but ended up with Mahogany which we installed and eventually painted Desert Camo.
 
     What does all this have to do with Steam Era Freight Cars?  The answer is if the military painted decking on trailers made of Mahogany to prevent rot caused by moisture in the desert, what business trying to keep costs (labor and materials) down would not put the best preservative on their revenue producing cars as soon as possible. 
 
     I would definitely defer to the managers of our railroads and give them credit for simple common sense.  Keeping their jobs is dependent on keeping profits up, failing to keep early failure of any part of any revenue creating car from happening is counter productive to the creation of profit by any railroad.
 
    In addition, the safety factor of not keeping a work area in good condition (walking on rotten running boards) could lead to injury if not death of emplyees.  You would defintely replace those that are a safety hazard and get it preserved (painted) as soon as possible.
As a result random boards might remain unpainted for a while due to emergency replace-ments, but were unlikely to stay that way longer than necessary.
 
Bob McCarthy
Modeling the Mighty Central of Georgia in Scale S

--- On Mon, 12/8/08, Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Box car running boards...painted or not?
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, December 8, 2008, 1:46 PM






--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

While researching another item, I was somewhat surprised to note in
the RP Cyc, Vol 3, article by Pat Wider that the bottoms of the wood
floors of box cars of our period were not painted. I'm certainly not
knowledgeable about the resistance to rot of wood used in box cars in
the 40's but I can't imagine leaving a piece of wood unpainted... on
the bottom of a box car or the underside of the eave of a house...
either of those being in the state of Florida for a few months. It is
hard to dispute the photo in the article however.

Pat also notes that wood running boards were usually left
unpainted. This, of course, has been commented on before on the STMFC
but I think it's worth a review. Looking at my favorite color photo
of box cars of our period from above...namely Jack Delano's shot of
C&NW's Proviso yard as seen on the cover of Mainline Modeler...
May '92...I can see no paintless running board among the many box
cars present. Included are C&NW, M&STL, SR, Monon, UP,PR, PE and Mil.

Photos of frt cars are often taken from the ground...giving no view
of the running board.

A couple of things come to mind here, Mike. First, and most
importantly, in your surprise to see a photo of one box car with the
underside of the floor unpainted have you jumped to the conclusion
that this was the norm? I doubt it and I hope not but all this proves
is that the floors of this particular order were unpainted.
Undoubtably there were others but does that make it a rule of thumb?
Second, even after WW II there were some preservatives, or
"treatments" , for wood that helped protect it against rot. How many
of them were "clear" in appearance I don't know but strongly suspect
there were several. As far as Jack Delano's photos are concerned I
could not agree with you more. His and other FSA photographer' s
photos of rural Vermont creameries and their associated rail
equipment have been a huge treasure trove for those of us interested
in the shipment of milk by rail. One could only wish that all FSA
photographers visited their boss, who summered in Greensboro, VT,
more often as that is when many of them were taken.

With regard to running boards, the only time I can recall seeing
an unpainted board from the top in a wooden running board was when
one had been replaced. As far as the bottom is concerned, who knows?
But here, again, some sort of preservative treatment might have been
used. I suspect it comes down to a labor cost vs. a material cost.
Did it cost more for the labor to replace a board in a running board
or was the material more expensive. The same thing is true with ties.
While the cost of a tie has increased a lot in recent years, the cost
of labor has more than kept pace. Given the present cost to change
out a tie I don't know how or why any railroad can afford to use a
less than the best tie today, especially with Amtrak operating over
it, but have seen substandard ties being installed on one such New
England railroad in the last two years.

When metal running boards became the norm, even though they were
usually of a galvanized material, it was just as common to see them
painted as not, even if most of the paint was worn off. This sounds
like a paint shop's choice to me.

All the best, Don Valentine


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Carbody Window Screens

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Hi Bob,

This is a subject of great interest to me, as all Santa Fe way cars (cabooses) have window screens, and often screen doors too. The product I really like is a fine mesh (nylon or some other synthetic) sold by American Models Builders in its Laserkit line. Kit no. 341 includes sash and door frames to fit the Athearn Santa Fe caboose. Laserkit has other screen window and door kits using the same material, but I don't know if it sells the mesh separately. Sunshine Models has included the same or a similar material in some of its kits, so it must be available somewhere else.

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@mrmag.com
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Re: Reciprocal bitching

brianehni <behni@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:
Well, as they say, stuff happens, and we all
realize that everyone makes mistakes (most of us, anyway).

Dennis
I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong. 8^)

Brian Ehni
Just Couldn't Resist, TN


Re: Reciprocal bitching

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:


There's so much BS on the internet, that it would be merely
prudent to distrust anything until you can corroborate it. Oh, sorry,
Richard Hendrickson already said that.
What's your view, Kurt? Everything on the internet is pure
spun
gold? Sheesh.

Tony Thompson
I donno, Tony, it seems that Kurt finding and directing us to the
Union Pacific Railroad's current reciprocal switching circular is
better than spun gold… polished platinum, perhaps.

It all boils down to the validity of the source. Picking up someone's
comment of a chat list that he thought he read somewhere in a model
railroad magazine…. Needs to be taken for what it's worth, which ain't
very much. However, when someone can cite primary source material,
it's still primary source material, even if it was on the internet.

I might point out to the `books are infallible' crowd that just this
weekend we uncovered incorrect information in two current books
relating to refrigerator cars owned or operated by Cudahy Packing Co.
and Cudahy Brothers Co. Well, as they say, stuff happens, and we all
realize that everyone makes mistakes (most of us, anyway). The
irritating thing is while we can pin down these errors here on the
internet, those authoritative print sources will be cited uncorrected
for the next couple decades at least.

I'm feeling particularly crabby this morning, I hate cold damp
weather, but I'll refrain from doing what is a favorite pastime for
some on this list; I won't call for the publisher to recall all those
copies with incorrect information and replace them with new ones, the
way that some feel model manufactures should when they deem something
is "wrong."

Dennis


Re: Lifelike Fowler CN

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Given all the remedial work seemingly required for this body shell,
wouldn't it be simpler to acquire a Speedwitch or Westerfield kit of
the desired car? One wonders...

Pierre Oliver


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

I know of a fellow who was looking in to getting a resin floor made
for
these shells. Last I heard the project was moving along. If
scratch
building one doesn't interest you, I think I would wait until
something like
that is available (assuming it turns out adequately.)

By the way, given the equal slope of the diagonal side bracing, I
wouldn't
call it a CPR car. If yours has a steel roof, I'd consider
sanding off the
ribs and gluing on new ones to look more CNR-ish. Maybe add a
piece of
light rail (centered on the ends) as a third vertical brace.
Alternately,
using a combination of ACC de-bonder and Easy Lift Off paint
remover, I was
able to slide a razor blade under the side bracing, removing the
two
vertical braces closest to the door, as well as the diagonal
braces. I
filled the original mounting holes and adjusted everything to get a
more
appropriate spacing and make it look more CPR-ish. While you're at
it,
consider removing all the ladders and grabs and replacing with
lighter
wire.....

Rob Kirkham


Re: The SHAKE N TAKE clinic is full.

Misc Clark
 

Greg, how do I get added to the "Instruction Only" list?
Clark Cone

On Sun, Dec 7, 2008 at 7:41 PM, <tgregmrtn@aol.com> wrote:





Guys,
The list is now complete for the online pre registration for the Shake N
Take clinic. We'll have a just few slots left for those registering at the
door
with no Internet access. I have also added for slots for what Al Brown
suggests as "Instruction Only" which will give you access to a handout for
the
modeling of the kit that I provide for the folks listed below. So let me
get this
out to you all and know that if you would like to add yourself under
"Instruction Only".
Also let me correct the time for the clinic: Friday January 09, 2009 at
3:30
PM in the Seahorse & Starfish Roo.

Here's the current list"

1.) Armend Premo
2.) Dr. Denny Anspach
3.) Tony Thompson
4.) Mont Switzer
5.) Schuyler Larrabee
6.) John Greedy
7.) William Bell
8.) Jeff Alley
9.) Mike Brock (if we can get him to stand still for 5 minutes)
10.) Gary Laakso
11.) Roger Hinman
13.) Richard Hendrickson
14.) Paul Lyons
15.) Bruce Smith
16.) Brian Carlson
17.) Jerry Glow
18.) John G Wheeler
19.) Dick Berry
20.) Lindsay Raley
21.) John Golden
22.) Owne Thorne
23.) Chirs Zygmont
24.) Ted Cullota
25.) Bill MCCoy
26.) Paul Bizier
27.) John Burroughs

INSTRUCTION ONLY:
1.) Al Brown
2.)
3.)
4.)
Thanks,
Greg Martin

.

**************Stay in touch with ALL of your friends: update your AIM,
Bebo,
Facebook, and MySpace pages with just one click. The NEW AOL.com.
(
http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&;icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000012
)





Re: Reciprocal switching

Larry Jackman <Ljack70117@...>
 

In Salina Ks on the Un Pac the charge was 35 dollars in the 40 and 50.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@comcast.net

On Dec 7, 2008, at 9:23 PM, andy.laurent wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "gary roe" <wabashrr@...> wrote:
"...Each railroad establishes a switching district in which it will
arrange to have a car delivered, regardless of whose tracks the
siding is located on. Railroads establish reciprocal agreements
(we'll switch your cars, if you switch ours) to ensure that cars are
delivered.

"The road handling the switch will be paid a switching charge which
is determined by each railroad within each switching district."

gary roe
quincy, illinois


Re: Box car running boards...painted or not?

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

While researching another item, I was somewhat surprised to note in
the RP Cyc, Vol 3, article by Pat Wider that the bottoms of the wood
floors of box cars of our period were not painted. I'm certainly not
knowledgeable about the resistance to rot of wood used in box cars in
the 40's but I can't imagine leaving a piece of wood unpainted...on
the bottom of a box car or the underside of the eave of a house...
either of those being in the state of Florida for a few months. It is
hard to dispute the photo in the article however.

Pat also notes that wood running boards were usually left
unpainted. This, of course, has been commented on before on the STMFC
but I think it's worth a review. Looking at my favorite color photo
of box cars of our period from above...namely Jack Delano's shot of
C&NW's Proviso yard as seen on the cover of Mainline Modeler...
May '92...I can see no paintless running board among the many box
cars present. Included are C&NW, M&STL, SR, Monon, UP,PR, PE and Mil.

Photos of frt cars are often taken from the ground...giving no view
of the running board.


A couple of things come to mind here, Mike. First, and most
importantly, in your surprise to see a photo of one box car with the
underside of the floor unpainted have you jumped to the conclusion
that this was the norm? I doubt it and I hope not but all this proves
is that the floors of this particular order were unpainted.
Undoubtably there were others but does that make it a rule of thumb?
Second, even after WW II there were some preservatives, or
"treatments", for wood that helped protect it against rot. How many
of them were "clear" in appearance I don't know but strongly suspect
there were several. As far as Jack Delano's photos are concerned I
could not agree with you more. His and other FSA photographer's
photos of rural Vermont creameries and their associated rail
equipment have been a huge treasure trove for those of us interested
in the shipment of milk by rail. One could only wish that all FSA
photographers visited their boss, who summered in Greensboro, VT,
more often as that is when many of them were taken.

With regard to running boards, the only time I can recall seeing
an unpainted board from the top in a wooden running board was when
one had been replaced. As far as the bottom is concerned, who knows?
But here, again, some sort of preservative treatment might have been
used. I suspect it comes down to a labor cost vs. a material cost.
Did it cost more for the labor to replace a board in a running board
or was the material more expensive. The same thing is true with ties.
While the cost of a tie has increased a lot in recent years, the cost
of labor has more than kept pace. Given the present cost to change
out a tie I don't know how or why any railroad can afford to use a
less than the best tie today, especially with Amtrak operating over
it, but have seen substandard ties being installed on one such New
England railroad in the last two years.

When metal running boards became the norm, even though they were
usually of a galvanized material, it was just as common to see them
painted as not, even if most of the paint was worn off. This sounds
like a paint shop's choice to me.

All the best, Don Valentine


Re: Cudahy meat reefers

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Dave and John,

I have Western Pacific Circular No. 167-E, a list of all shippers on the WP, SN, and TS, plus other roads where there might be local interchange. My copy is circa 1957.

Cudahy Packing Co. is listed as "No. Salt Lake (Not in S.L. Switching Yard Limit)". The commodity is abbreviated "PHP", but this not defined. The plant was jointly switched by the WP, "DRG", and UP. Its capacity was 9 cars.

Another Cudahy location is listed in San Francisco at 1423 Sansome Street. The commodity is again "PHP". The plant was on the tracks of the State Belt Railroad, and the track held just 2 cars.

Finally, there was a Cudahy plant listed in Oakland at 3rd and Alice Streets. Again "PHP". This facility was switched by the WP itself, and had a capacity of 1 car.

There are other meat companies which had their own reefers listed, including Swift and John Morrel..

Plenty of uses for meat reefers here.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff



Dave Nelson wrote:

John Hile wrote:


In the late 20's Cudahy is listed as having packing facilities in:
Fresno, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Bernardino, and San Francisco per
an ATSF Shipper's guide of the era.
In the steam era Cudahy's main slaughterhouse was in Salt Lake City and they
shipped beef and lamb sides to the west coast where the packing facilities
cut them up for deliveries to the local retail market. IIRC they also had
something in Denver but at this moment I do not recall if it was just
another packing house or a full slaughterhouse operation.

The Oakland packing house, and I think the one in San Francisco too, had
rail service provided by the WP.

Dave Nelson


Re: Reciprocal switching

Greg Martin
 

Gene,

You're correct it is a spoiler. Dennis' answer is correct, but what he didn't mention and I would presume he thought we would have realize is that you need an interchange nearby or a small yard. There are some places that agreements are in place where within the switching districts the participating railroads would rotate the switching duties for the district, Tony Thompson might remind you that Bakersfield, CA had just such an agreement.

Most folks here likely don't realize that most of the greater Chicago area is reciprocal. Most railroads had agents that monitored reciprocal switching circulars, and you ask why a special agent, because some industries were only reciprocal to certain commodities, and not reciprocal in general. So the industries were listed in a special version of the OPSL (Open and Prepaid Station List) that kept track of which industries nationwide were reciprocal and to whom. These arrangements were "trade-offs" to open industries in other areas that the competing railroad wanted to gain access to. There were fees but generally these fees were small in comparison to "Line Haul Switches". Here in Salem, OR the entire town is reciprocal and the interchange fee is $135.00 paid by the reciprocal carrier to the origin carrier on an origin shipment and by the origin carrier to the destination carrier on a destination move. The shippers route on the waybill would be something like this (ATSF origin bill) Kansas City, MO for KCS delvy with that abbreviation.

Kurt, what we read online is not always complete Bulls**t as you suggest, "that some denizens of this group" believe to be but if you read deeper into the circular that you pulled down of the web you will find that the UPRR's list of reciprocal industries is "short" and that is typical UPRR Bulls**t... Check Salem, OR and Chehalis, WA. Chehalis for the UPRR was acquired after the Milwaukee RR left the scene.

Tim, it sounds like you are confusing Reciprocal switching with a Line Haul Switch and they are two very different actions. Line Hauls were in the tariff and reciprocals were in circulars.

Greg Martin

In a message dated 12/07/08 16:25:31 Pacific Standard Time, bierglaeser@yahoo.com writes:
Thank you, Kurt. It is good to have the correct information even
though it spoils the idea of one RR switching at an industry of another
RR in my industrial area.

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

I know that some denizens of this group are predisposed to consider
anything
found on the internet as complete bullsh_t, but I think this has some
validity:

http://www.uprr.com/customers/shortline/attachments/prior_uprsc.pdf

See definition on page 5.

KL


Re: Lifelike Fowler CN

Robert kirkham
 

I know of a fellow who was looking in to getting a resin floor made for these shells. Last I heard the project was moving along. If scratch building one doesn't interest you, I think I would wait until something like that is available (assuming it turns out adequately.)

By the way, given the equal slope of the diagonal side bracing, I wouldn't call it a CPR car. If yours has a steel roof, I'd consider sanding off the ribs and gluing on new ones to look more CNR-ish. Maybe add a piece of light rail (centered on the ends) as a third vertical brace. Alternately, using a combination of ACC de-bonder and Easy Lift Off paint remover, I was able to slide a razor blade under the side bracing, removing the two vertical braces closest to the door, as well as the diagonal braces. I filled the original mounting holes and adjusted everything to get a more appropriate spacing and make it look more CPR-ish. While you're at it, consider removing all the ladders and grabs and replacing with lighter wire.....

Rob Kirkham


Re: Reciprocal switching

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
In other words: Many on this group *are* predisposed to consider anything found on the internet as *absolute* BS at first blush, and that which is only *near* BS is frequently just as bad because of inaccuracies and omissions.
There's so much BS on the internet, that it would be merely prudent to distrust anything until you can corroborate it. Oh, sorry, Richard Hendrickson already said that.
What's your view, Kurt? Everything on the internet is pure spun gold? Sheesh.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Lifelike Fowler CN

W.R.Dixon
 

red_gate_rover wrote:
In an impulse purchase I picked up a LifeLike Canada Fowler boxcar. It
came without the underframe and trucks. What underframe could I use
and whose trucks would be right? Also the shell is painted and
lettered for CN but has no data. Who sells data and other markings for
this car and what resource do I need to know where things should go? I model 1929. As always, thank you. -Jim
When LifeLike Canada first produced these cars they screwed them up. Some came with incomplete lettering. They responded by supplying complete new shells. Stores were allowed to do what they wanted with the bad shells. Most gave them to the car purchasers as a bonus. Some sold them.

Other than the original incorrect under frame there is nothing that the shell will drop on. You will have to make something your self. I would start with a Westerfield kit and copy their under frame in styrene.

Bill Dixon


Re: Reciprocal switching

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Kurt Laughlin writes:

"Nothing close to it, eh? Here's some recent quotes, selected quickly for
relevance and not to pick on anyone:"

"About all it takes to be "a expert" on the internet is to buy a computer."

And, of course, that comment is mine. Unfortunately, my experience has shown it to be true. You should NOT, however, assume...and while I'll let others speak for themselves, I have a feeling that they will agree with me...that I was speaking of the STMFC. One of the reasons why I insist that members sign their real names on the STMFC is that it suggests that a member is prepared to support any comment they might make...and they are identified with it. It doesn't mean they are always correct but it does mean that they try to be. Regretfully...IMO...most of the internet permits...even encourages the use of aliases, presumably to provide anonymity. I belong to several groups managed that way...non RR oriented...and the content of most posts is such as to believe them at your own perile.

Mind you, just because something is delivered via a media that has editing does not guarantee anything beyond "hope" that the subject is "accurate". I attempted twice to "enlighten" the staff at Trains and Classic Trains [ which is one of my favorite publications ] regarding "errors" [ IMO ]about certain steam locomotives written by rather well published authors...to no avail...even though I presented facts from other authors writing in Trains [ Lloyd Stagner no less ]. I finally presented my case in of all places...the INTERNET. So...in some cases, the internet wins. I will note, however, that Model Railroading News did publish a few similar comments.

You might also note my question to the group regarding the painting of running boards...in which my observations seems to disagree with a comment by the very respected author Pat Wider.

So...relax. No one is taking shots at anyone in particular...unless maybe at me...and I'm used to it because I have a big target on my back.

Mike Brock


Re: Seaboard Air Line IMWX boxcar

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Ed,



Thank you for the information and the reminder of the great info that you
and others have compiled on the site. I just visited the site and enjoyed
reviewing the info there.



Allen


Re: Truck roof walk help NP 1937 AAR

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

8 rung ladders! I missed that. Built the kit at a show this weekend and the
RMJ was here at home. Darn. Going to have to fix that.
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brian Leppert" <b.leppert@att.net>
Did you put on eight rung ladders?


Re: Car Types for Team Tracks

David Smith
 

Apparently, at least 10 were owned and operated by the Federal Government
(Dept. of Commerce), but were largely replaced by trucks in the 30s and were
out of operation by 1947 http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/fishcar.Html
A picture of a Montana state car accompanies the Wikipedia entry on stock
cars http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stock_car_(rail) Fry (juvenile fish) were
shipped cross-country as well as locally. They apparently mostly traveled
in passenger consists, to expedite their journey.

Dave Smith


On Sun, Dec 7, 2008 at 10:20 PM, Schuyler Larrabee <
schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net> wrote:

Exactly what I was talking about. Except I think that GN had some of
their own. You're right
though, the car I was thinking of was owned by the Pennsylvania Department
of Fish and Game, or the
equivalent.

SGL

Gary, Schuyler,

Fish for your dining table in reefers. Shellfish in express reefers. Live
fish traveled in Pullman type cars,
usually owned by the state they operated in. These were for stocking
rivers and lakes. Many RRs
hauled these cars back
in the day.

Fred Freitas

--- On Sun, 12/7/08, Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net<schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net>
<mailto:schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net<schuyler.larrabee%2540verizon.net>>

wrote:

From: Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net<schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net><mailto:
schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net <schuyler.larrabee%2540verizon.net>> >
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Car Types for Team Tracks
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:
STMFC%40yahoogroups.com <STMFC%2540yahoogroups.com>>
Date: Sunday, December 7, 2008, 9:29 PM

-----Original Message-----
From: gary laakso

2- fish; refrigerator cars?
Well, reefers if they're dead fish (I should hope so!). But they may have
been live fish for
stocking lakes and streams. I know several railroads had fish hatchery
cars (there may be a better
more accurate term), and that the GN was one of them. PRR and LV both had
them, I think. Probably
others. These carried hatchlings from fish hatcheries to the locations
where they were to be
"delivered."

SGL








--
David L. Smith
Da Vinci Science Center
Allentown, PA
http://www.davinci-center.org

Please consider the environment before printing this email.

Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But since no one was
listening, everything must be said again. -- Andre Gide


Re: Truck roof walk help NP 1937 AAR

Brian Leppert <b.leppert@...>
 

Self-aligning, spring plankless, double truss 50 ton trucks. The next
truck from Tahoe Model Works.

Did you put on eight rung ladders?

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

-- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

I am trying to finish off two models and need some help with the
trucks. I
am working on an NP 1937 AAR boxcar. The kit comes with trucks with
Spring
planks. I have the July 1991 RMJ which has an article by Ed hawkins.
However
the photo is so small the trucks are tough to see. I think they are
spring
plankless trucks.

Also the kit comes with a wood roof walk Did these cars keep a wood
roof
walk their entire lives? Thanks.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

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