Date   

Re: Lehigh Valley Roof Walk Help

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 18, 2008, at 10:49 AM, parkvarieties wrote:

The Lehigh Valley had a series of steel box cars #61300-61899 built
during the mid-1940's. Can anyone tell me if these cars were built
with wood or metal roof walks? If built with wood, would they have
been changed to metal by the mid-1950's? Thanks.
Frank Brua






Frank, the LV freight car folio diagram for these cars identifies the
running boards applied when new as Apex steel grid.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: Radial Roofs

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 18, 2008, at 10:01 AM, dssa1051 wrote:

I did a quick search of the site but found very little on radial
roofs.
Were the Central Valley radial roofs (from the CV stockcar)
specific to
the NP or could it be used on other roads' cars?




The CV roof represents the NP's unique "circular" outside metal roof,
which (AFAIK) was not used by any other RR.

Did other manufacturers of radial roofs use a more prominent seam
cap on their
roofs?



Yes, and on the Hutchins, Viking, and Murphy radial roofs the curve
or arch of the roof was shallower. Also, both the Hutchins and
Murphy roofs had small intermediate stiffening ribs in each panel,
and the Viking roof had two such stiffening ribs in each panel.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Lehigh Valley Roof Walk Help

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Frank Brua asked:
"The Lehigh Valley had a series of steel box cars #61300-61899 built
during the mid-1940's. Can anyone tell me if these cars were built
with wood or metal roof walks? If built with wood, would they have
been changed to metal by the mid-1950's?"

Your answer is contained in this table which Ed Hawkins made available
online for everyone six years ago:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/1937aarpdfmain.html


Ben Hom


Lehigh Valley Roof Walk Help

parkvarieties <parkvarieties@...>
 

Group,

The Lehigh Valley had a series of steel box cars #61300-61899 built
during the mid-1940's. Can anyone tell me if these cars were built
with wood or metal roof walks? If built with wood, would they have
been changed to metal by the mid-1950's? Thanks.
Frank Brua


GN Plywood Panel Box Cars

parkvarieties <parkvarieties@...>
 

Group,

Approximately when did the GN start repainting the plywood panel box
cars from the as-delivered orange paint scheme to their standard
freight car color? Thanks.
Frank Brua


Re: Feed Mills

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, water.kresse@... wrote:

I assummed that the 1937 era 70-ton covered hops were targeted for
denser materials such as gypsum for making cement. The gypsum
staining is why the C&O eventually changed over to gray from black
covered hops.

Al Kresse
Ft Dodge Iowa is/was one of the largest producer/miner of Gypsum. The
stuff sold to cement plants was on 2" (+ -) chunks deliverd in open
hoppers throughout the Midwest.
Differences in parts of the country?
Clark Propst


3-pack offer on SR/C&O S-scale wood rack

Jim King
 

A point of clarification re: my 3-pack offer for the upcoming S scale SR/C&O
pulpwood racks is in order. "Bulk pack" pricing applies only for direct
mail orders and is not offered to dealers. Customers can freely mix and
match any of the 3 cars (2 SR, 1 C&O) to get the 3-pack price which is 10%
less than buying them individually ($189 vs. $210) . plus $10 shipping. My
web site needs clarification but that'll take a couple days to update it, so
this email will suffice until then.



As always, please contact me off-list if you have questions.



Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


B&O M-53 Wagon Top - any hope of a plastic model in our future?

Charlie Duckworth <trduck@...>
 

Well another year almost by us and I still would like a B&O M-53 Wagon
Top on the layout. For a steam - early diesl layout they are a must
have in a rail yard. I got my wish last year with the ART steel reefer
being issued so perhaps there's hope.

Anybody heard any rumors of a scale B&O car being done in plastic?

Charlie
Modeling 'the Mop'
http://mopac51.tripod.com/index.html


Radial Roofs

dssa1051
 

I did a quick search of the site but found very little on radial roofs.
Were the Central Valley radial roofs (from the CV stockcar) specific to
the NP or could it be used on other roads' cars? Did other
manufacturers of radial roofs use a more prominent seam cap on their
roofs? Obviously the general shape of the roof is not difficult to
model but the ribs would be. I have some old Silver Streak roof ribs
(stamped metal) which were an excellent idea but probably not very
close to scale given our current injection molded roofs.

Robert Oom


Re: Floor-level ice decks?

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

David lets look closely at the photo in question
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?q=Railroads+source:life&imgurl=c8c944bb1f85f35a

The ice dock on the right is for top icing produce cars, they men are chipping up the ice and blowing it directly through the
doors on top of the load. See the hose going into the open doors at the second car. The hose is attached to the blower, which is
probably on wheels for moving to each car. See the ice debris on the dock by the first car, it has already been top iced.
Here is a better photo showing this operation
http://images.google.com/hosted/life/f?q=ice+railroad+source:life&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dice%2Brailroad%2Bsource:life%26hl%3Den%26safe
%3Doff&imgurl=10457243e6c0caf6

The ice dock on the left, has two ice decks. The lower deck of the ice dock is at roof height. The upper level is above the car
roofs with carts holding chunked, chipped or crushed ice (depending upon the shippers request) that could be dumped into the
chutes. You can see a couple of raised chutes at the far end of the upper deck. The chutes would be positioned and lowered so they
could channel the ice into the bunkers from above, in a fast and easy motion. They were movable, fixed to a rail along the edge of
the dock and could be re-positioned so they could be spotted right over a bunker opening.

The salt was kept in boxes attached to the posts of the upper deck, with an opening at the bottom. Look closely at the left dock
and you will see the boxes on every other post, going up the full height of the post. The boxes were filled with salt from above,
and the salt was shoveled into the bunkers, using a scoop shovel, getting the salt from an opening at the bottom of the box.

I doubt the ice was channeled down the chutes, as each car could have different ice/salt requirements, unless each cart has the
required ice/salt mixture. Then you would have to know which cart was for which car. More probably while ice was coming down the
chute another employee was standing on the car roof walk with a scoop shovel of salt mixing as the ice flowed.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Resin Casting

Earl T. Hackett <hacketet@...>
 

Yes, that's a 1402. I got it used for $300. There are a lot of them
available on the used market. I took it apart, cleaned it up, added
new oil and it runs like a champ. The only problem with it (besides
being really heavy) was that the original 1/2 HP motor had problems
getting it started. So I upgraded it to a 3/4HP motor with a heavy
start winding. It is overkill as far as volume flow is concerned, but
the larger oil capacity and overall design makes it less sensitive to
contaminants than HVAC pumps. You really do need the high vacuum
levels it produces to degas some of the thicker resin formulations I
occasionally use.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Brechbiel" <martinwb@...> wrote:


One question - Is that a Sargent-Welch 1402 vac pump you're using
and
do you really need that much of a pump? I've 8 of them in my labs
and
properly plumbed up they can draw a very serious vacuum...

Martin Brechbiel


Re: Modernizing an HO Branchline wood reefer

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

Mark,

The hand brake was changed to a Klasing version like that included in
the P2K Mather box car kits. In the photo you posted, you can see
the gearing mechanism peeking above the eaves on the end. There was
also small vertical straps added below the bottom door hinges. When
I covered these cars in Essential Freight Cars, I modernized the
stock Branchline car, but not as modern as you are seeking as I did
not add the side sill reinforcement.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road
Guilford, CT 06437
(203) 453-6174
info@speedwitch.com


Modernizing an HO Branchline wood reefer

Mark Mathu
 

I recently picked up a Branchline Trains 40' ACF URTX/NWX wood reefer,
which I'd like to use as the basis for a model of one of these reefers
as it would have appeared near the end of its service life.

Here is information on the Branchline model:
http://www.branchline-trains.com/blueprint/reefers/urtx_reefers.htm

Here is an image of a modernized WRX 40' reefer:
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/gbw/wrx9785ajs.jpg

The most visible change from the kit is the deep side sill on the car.

But what other changes would distinguish the Branchline kit (1920s
era prototype) from a modernized wood reefer – for instance, the brake
system? The vertical brake staff of the Branchline kit is still
there, but would the brake system under the car be different? How
about the trucks – would the trucks supplied with the Branchline kit
still be in use on the car forty years later?

Thanks. If I didn't ask these questions and built the car straight
from the kit, you know that someone would point out the shortcomings
just as soon as the decals dried.

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.


B&O ex PRR R7 reefers. was Fwd: Al Westerfield's new R7 reefer version with Hutchins roof

James Mischke <jmischke@...>
 

B&O had at least two of these former PRR class R7 reefers in
company ice service.

Paul Dunn photographed XM-4784 at Wellston, Ohio on October 8,
1954, negative in the John LaRue collection. The 1961 MofW
roster shows X-4784 converted from FGE 46025, outshopped 7-2-51.
Photo published in Gary Schlerf's milk car article in the
Sentinel, 1991, July-Aug. issue, page 15.

Another such car is XM-4785, the 1961 MofW roster also shows FGE
45461 heritage, also outshopped 7-2-51. Unlabeled photo by Ron
Stucky, John Fuller collection. Mr. Fuller is a photo vendor
who sells at Naperville.

The PRR R7 refrigerator cars date from 1913 or so, at least ten
years after PRR active control of B&O and the day of PRR designs
on B&O.




A potential source of confusion here is B&O and PRR class
numbers. B&O had its own numerous R-7 refrigerator car class,
nearly all conveyed to Fruit Growers Express, and several later
in B&O company ice service as well. Just like the PRR R7's. Be
careful not to confuse the two cars.






benjaminfrank_hom wrote:


Forwarded from the STMFC group. Ben Hom

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <bwelch@...> wrote:

I received my order yesterday from Al of this new version of the ex-
PRR R7 that were all eventually sold to Fruit Growers Express. I am
already building the previous release, one of each of the early
roofs.

One significant change to this release in addition to the Hutchins
roof. Al includes the parts to modify the ends of wood bulge plates
just above the sill. On the cars built by the Pennsy, these
structures had another bracket casting indentical to the others,
while the cars built by the commercial builders had a different kind
of bracket at the end of this bulge beam. The PRR built cars also
had a six rung side ladder and no drop grab under the ladder. I
spent the morning modifying one of the cars already underway with
end beam parts pirated from one of the new kits. There is some
slight surgery required to cut into the body casting on each end. It
looks really good with the new parts applied.

Regarding the Hutchins roof, I have a Wil Whittaker photo of FGEX
43509 reweighed at Hillyard Washington on 9-45 with the Hutchins
roof applied. (Still equiped w/KD brakes too.) Modelers need to
remove the small rib cast into each roof panel as panels used by FGE
did not have these. I removed them from three roofs last night while
watching a DVR recording of "Sand Hogs." Sanding each panel with 600
grit sandpaper and then 1000 grit goes quickly.

Practicially no two of these cars were the same with different sill
steps on some, different lengths of the second grab on the left end
of the car, or no second grab, two different trucks, etc, so they
are fun to build with different details. The sill step from Terry
Wegmans PFE kit are perfect for many of these cars.

Best to work from photos. Enjoy!

Bill

--- End forwarded message ---

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Floor-level ice decks?

David Soderblom
 

Sorry to be late to the party, but this is in response to Tim O's posting on Nov. 22. I didn't
see anyone bring up what seems ot me the most remarkable thing about this photo, which is
the presence of an ice-loading deck which is at the height of the car floors.

Why in the world? Every other ice-loading deck I've ever seen in a photo is for loading ice
into bunkers from roof level. What use is ice at floor level? Obviously this deck did it
regularly, for there are the machine-driven chains to drag the blocks along.

BTW, the second deck on the left is for dumping salt into the bunkers after they were iced,
generally for meat reefers.



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD 21210
david.soderblom@gmail.com


SR/C&O "S" scale wood rack a "go"

Jim King
 

I have received a sufficient number of reservations to proceed with the
Southern/C&O 41' pulpwood rack, circa 1951 to the late 70s. Patterns
arrived on Monday and they look REALLY sharp! This will be a
super-detailed, unique kit.



Target ship date is early January. For those of you who have sent in a
deposit, please send the balance plus shipping to complete your order.
Those of you who have not sent a deposit, please send the entire amount
(plus shipping) to confirm your order. Dealers will receive their kits
first, followed by pre-paid deposit orders. Verbal reservations that remain
unpaid by the start of kit shipments will be canceled.



To see photos of the prototypes, go to this link:
http://www.smokymountainmodelworks.com/soupulpwood.html



Kit descriptions and applicable shipping charges are noted on this page.


Contact me off-list if paying via credit card and/or if you have questions.



Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


Re: Wabash Panel Side Hopper

Gene Deimling <losgatos48@...>
 

Ed-
Thank you for the information.

Gene Deimling


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote:


On Dec 17, 2008, at 5:01 PM, losgatos48@... wrote:

I have a photo of a Wabash twin hopper with panel sides. The car
number is 34279. Can someone tell me a little bit about these
cars?
Are they rebuilt USRA twins or a similar design?
Gene,
My notes indicate cars from WAB 34000-34499 were USRA-style
rebuilds
with panel sides for 1941 cu. ft. capacity. The original cars were
built in 1923. A photo of 34215 taken in 1938 indicates rebuilding
11-36. Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Grain loading?

Michael Bishop <goldrod_1@...>
 

In the 1940'/50's, how much time was needed to load a boxcar with grain
at a grain elevator? I am trying to help a friend with his layout
operations, as to how much time to be given to each car before moving
it. He is using several of the Walthers AMD elevators. Thanks for any
help.

Michael Bishop


Re: Wabash Panel Side Hopper

Ed Hawkins
 

On Dec 17, 2008, at 5:01 PM, losgatos48@comcast.net wrote:

I have a photo of a Wabash twin hopper with panel sides. The car
number is 34279. Can someone tell me a little bit about these cars?
Are they rebuilt USRA twins or a similar design?
Gene,
My notes indicate cars from WAB 34000-34499 were USRA-style rebuilds
with panel sides for 1941 cu. ft. capacity. The original cars were
built in 1923. A photo of 34215 taken in 1938 indicates rebuilding
11-36. Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: CSOX 5394 question

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "brianehni" <behni@...> wrote:

One episode of the Discovery Channel's "Dirty Jobs" programs covered
feed mills. Molasses is a major ingredient in cattle feed.

Sorry but I can't resist chiming in here. There is a steel mill here
in town and a scrapper immediately adjacent. For almost 20 years that
I know of now there has been a tank car setting on an isolated section
of track on the scrapper's grounds. Apparently someone started to cut
it up only to discover that it is still full of molasses.

My drawing of the car is mostly complete. (The Superior hand brake is
now in my back yard.) The car's tank has been swapped at some point
and the brake rigging rearranged some. The present tank full of
molasses is insulated. Lettering is badly faded and quite hard to
read in some places. The underframe, at least, was built by GATC in
1956 if memory serves. (And memory seems to serve less and less these
days.)

Gene Green

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