Date   

Re: Model Rail Hobbyist - online magazine

Mark P.
 

I was able to download the e-zine without registering - did I miss a step I was supposed to do? I just clicked on the download link.

Mark Plank

----- Original Message -----
I am shaking my head in wonder....How can a start-up e-zine make it
so difficult and cumbersome to simply view their publication? I
look at many online magazines, and having to register each time
seems to be an unnecessary roadblock which many don't require. Once
logged on, the 3 download options are all un- downloadable on my 4
year old computer! I guess that I am resigned to NEVER view what is
offered.
--
Be Yourself @ mail.com!
Choose From 200+ Email Addresses
Get a Free Account at www.mail.com


Re: Model Rail Hobbyist - online magazine

Andy Carlson
 

I am shaking my head in wonder....How can a start-up e-zine make it so difficult and cumbersome to simply view their publication? I look at many online magazines, and having to register each time seems to be an unnecessary roadblock which many don't require. Once logged on, the 3 download options are all un- downloadable on my 4 year old computer! I guess that I am resigned to NEVER view what is offered.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Model Rail Hobbyist - online magazine

Marty McGuirk
 

Virgil and all,

Link is http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Young <rayvirg@...> wrote:

Marty,

Somehow I missed the link to download the magazine.  Would you give
it again?

Virgil Young
Amarillo, TX


Re: Prototype Rails/Cocoa Beach 2009 Photos

Cyril Durrenberger
 

On page 7 there was a photo of an undecorated DM&IR wood caboose indicating that it was coming from Walthers.  Are there any more details?
 
thanks,
 
Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Fri, 1/16/09, John Golden <golden1014@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: John Golden <golden1014@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Prototype Rails/Cocoa Beach 2009 Photos
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, January 16, 2009, 5:32 AM






Mike,

I uploaded some Cocoa Beach 09 photos on my PBase site at

http://www.pbase. com/golden1014/ cocoa_beach_ 2009&page= all

Admittedly, most of the photos I took are of steam era-based
subjects and models I want to feature in the SCL Modeler. There are
some people photos too. I never seem to take enough photos of people
or models. Feel free to grab anything you'd like for your site.

Once again, thanks for a terrific time!

John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Photos of Prototype Rails will be uploaded into the STMFC photo
section
under Prototype Rails 2009 in an ongoing process. Non freight car
photos
will eventually be removed and the meet's photos will be placed in
the
Prototype Rails website.

The work of a meet "boss" never ends....

Mike Brock


Re: Prototype Rails/Cocoa Beach 2009 Photos

golden1014
 

Mike,

I uploaded some Cocoa Beach 09 photos on my PBase site at

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014/cocoa_beach_2009&page=all

Admittedly, most of the photos I took are of steam era-based
subjects and models I want to feature in the SCL Modeler. There are
some people photos too. I never seem to take enough photos of people
or models. Feel free to grab anything you'd like for your site.

Once again, thanks for a terrific time!

John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN





--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Photos of Prototype Rails will be uploaded into the STMFC photo
section
under Prototype Rails 2009 in an ongoing process. Non freight car
photos
will eventually be removed and the meet's photos will be placed in
the
Prototype Rails website.

The work of a meet "boss" never ends....

Mike Brock


Re: Roundhouse/MDC metal cars

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Garth G. Groff" <ggg9y@...> wrote:

Gene, Don and Fred,

MDC offered two 40' cast metal gondolas. One was a high-side car,
and
was offered both with flat and heap-shield (C&O) ends. IIRC, this
car
had a multi-piece body, with the floor, ends, and sides as separate
castings which allowed the different ends to be mated with the same
sides and floor. This car was later carried over into plastic with
flat
ends and using a die-cast underframe (same as was used on their
1960s-1970s plastic boxcars).

Their other gon was a low-side, possibly of Erie prototype. It was
also
offered lettered for Southern, but has the wrong number of ribs for
their low-sides. I still have one of these in my collection.

Kind regards,

I have one of each and the MDC operating ballast car as well, all
in zamac, and can attest to the correctness of Garth's remarks. The
gons were assembled with two small screws per side through tabs cast
into the inner side of the side castings that went into holes in the
floors. The ends were "locked" in place between the sides. They are
the "right" era but every time I look at those things I think to
myself "thank God we don't model like that anymore". They're an
excellent reminder of just how far we have come in this hobby even
for one such as myself who does not care for on line rags that then
have to be printed to retain them in a usable form.

Take care, Don Valentine


Re: Automobile Car Shortage

cinderandeight@...
 

Interesting article Richard.
I went to the Annual Freight car order summary for the year of 1916 in
Railway Age magazine to see who was ordering auto box cars to fill the need (Railway
Age, V. 62 #1 PP. 24-27). Over 9300 such cars are listed for nearly 20
roads. The builders range from little Lenoir (500 cars for the SOU) to Ralston
Steel Car in Columbus (1000-UP, 100-T&NO, 501-SP).
Western Steel had the largest number of orders (1000-C&NW, !000-NYC&StL).
Other big orders were for the PRR Lines West (1000 from company shops, X25A
all steel cars).
LV (500-Std. Steel, 500-Pullman, 500-ACF)
GN (500-H&B)
CB&Q (500-ACF)

It should be noted that the Pennsylvania was feverishly grading a new line
into Detroit in 1916 and laying out a yard. Until it was completed they were
using trackage rights up the PMRR to the Wabash at Romulus, MI and from there
into The Wabash Oakwood yard to access the auto traffic. The new line didn't
open until 1922 due to the USRA take over of railroads, and it was the last
expansion of a US railroad into a major city via new construction.

What perhaps is most striking in the order announcement figures was who
wasn't listed. The NYC/MCRR controlled most of the Detroit area's auto traffic.
The other roads into the city were the Pere Marquette, Wabash, Grand Truck
Western, and Detroit Toledo & Ironton. Of all these roads only the DT&I had any
new auto cars on order in 1916 (400-ACF). All these roads did have auto cars
already, but I'm a bit surprised they were not addressing the shortage in their
own area more agressively. Perhap someone will come up with orders for these
roads that were not listed in 1916, but built that year.

Rich Burg

**************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
steps!
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cemailfooterNO62)


Re: Prototype Rails-2009-Shake and Take Clinic

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, tgregmrtn@... wrote:

Jared and all,

I just got home last night and I just loved the weather,?but now
back to reality...

The subject this year was of a prototype of the UP Stock car S-40-10
and they would have fit your era as the cars were rebuilt in two
batches first in 1934 and the last batch in 1938. However: I do
understand that not everyone wants a stock car, but we strive not to
duplicate a subject back to back, we like to mix them up. We do
appreciate the fact that if for whatever reason that the car doesn't
fit that you allow room in the clinic for someone who does honestly
want to build the "Cocoa-kit".

Yes, the UP stock car would have worked for me. Somehow I thought the
Cocoa-Kit was going to be another car. If I had realized I would have
signed up.
Jared Harper


Re: Prototype Rails-2009-Shake and Take Clinic

Greg Martin
 

Jared and all,

I just got home last night and I just loved the weather,?but now back to reality...

The subject this year was of a prototype of the UP Stock car S-40-10 and they would have fit your era as the cars were rebuilt in two batches first in 1934 and the last batch in 1938. However: I do understand that not everyone wants a stock car, but we strive not to duplicate a subject back to back, we like to mix them up. We do appreciate the fact that if for whatever reason that the car doesn't fit that you allow room in the clinic for someone who does honestly want to build the "Cocoa-kit".

Jeff Alley has ask me to post the Power-Point and the handout to the list and as I get settled I will do that (a first I must admit) so others can participate. But I need to finish mine completely and I will post it at that time. Jim Singer is having the decals done and as promised they will be mailed to all who gave me the list.

Great Meet this year and as Denny has mentioned next year is our 10th and we'll have another Cocoa-Kit ready once again.
?
More later...

Greg Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: Jared Harper <harper-brown@juno.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, 12 Jan 2009 2:45 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Re:Prototype Rails-2009-Shake and Take Clinic






I would like to participate in this one. However, I model May 1943
so the models produced in this clinic so far are too late for me.
Could we do one matching my era?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Prototype Rails/Cocoa Beach 2009 Photos

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Photos of Prototype Rails will be uploaded into the STMFC photo section under Prototype Rails 2009 in an ongoing process. Non freight car photos will eventually be removed and the meet's photos will be placed in the Prototype Rails website.

The work of a meet "boss" never ends....

Mike Brock


Automobile Car Shortage

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

Found this on Google Books. Richard Wilkens

From The Automobile Magazine. February 17, 1916, Page 340

Freight Car Shortage Becomes Serious Problem in Detroit and Toledo

Flats and Other Types of Car Are Adapted to take Automobiles—Dealers
Urged to Unload Promptly—January Shipments Break Records

DETROIT, Feb. 12—In spite of a serious handicap due to the shortage
of automobile freight cars, Detroit automobile manufacturers managed
to ship approximately 58,800 motor cars of the passenger type during
January. This figure was obtained by a careful canvass of the
concerns here and is a close approximation to the actual number. Yet
this rather large shipment would have been much greater had the
makers been able to secure all the railroad cars they wanted in which
to convey the vehicles to their destinations. Although in many cases
the number of automobiles that left the city was greater than ever
before in the history of the concerns in question, there are other
big producers whose shipments were curtailed as much as 40 per cent
by the lack of railroad cars. One big maker, for instance, shipped a
little over 3500 automobiles, and would have been able to ship 5000
could the freight cars have been secured.

Yet with this shipping situation and the materials markets troubling
them, the car makers nevertheless enjoyed the largest January in the
history of the business here, taking the industry collectively. It is
an unusual thing for dealers to be crying for cars at this time of
the year, and never before have they been so insistent for them when
the winter months were on. In fact, so anxious have some of them
become for cars that they have actually driven them over the snow-
covered roads to their own towns rather than wait for freight
shipping.

Number of Carloads

The traffic department of the National Automobile Chamber of Commerce
has reported total carload shipments for the whole United States for
January to be 18,054. Although in some cases less than five
automobiles make up a carload, and in others the number is greater,
it seems logical to say that each freight car would average five
machines. On that basis, the number of freight carloads leaving
Detroit in January was 11,760. This figures to pretty near 65 per
cent of the total number.

However, there can be no disguising of the fact that freight
conditions are bad. In most cases the automobile freight car is a
special type, and while it is of use to other lines of industry as
well as to the automobile maker, the latter is not in so good a
position, for
it is hard for him to utilize the other types of cars. But necessity
has forced the traffic departments of the big companies to take
whatever railroad equipment they can secure quickly.

Utilizing What They Can Get

As a result it is not uncommon to see big shipments of motor vehicles
on flat cars, and in some cases they are even utilizing gondola and
other types of coal cars. These they box over and really make very
presentable box cars out of them. Some of the makers who have made
use of flats are the Studebaker Corp., Maxwell, Paige, the Overland
in Toledo and the Velie at Moline, 111. Wherever possible these flat
cars have so far been used only for the shipping of export cars to
the coast. That is, the export machines are very tightly boxed and no
harm can come to them through open shipment in similar fashion to
harvesting machinery, etc. Where the run is comparatively short,
Studebaker has been using flats in conjunction with heavy tarpaulins
which they use very carefully to cover the cars against any weather
conditions. The use of gondola cars is perhaps the most unusual
adaptation of whatever can be secured in the way of railroad rolling
stock.

According to the traffic bureau statistics, there are in use by the
American railroads at the present time 68,235 automobile freight
cars, and there is prospect of 10,000 more being added to this
equipment in the very near future. This will give an enormous
equipment designed for the special service of the automobile
industry, which to-day has developed to the point where it is one of
the chief sources of freight revenue of the railroads, but even with
the added number it is doubtful if the supply will keep pace with
motor car production. The railroads seem to be doing all they can to
help the movement of motor cars, but they did not anticipate the
demand and, although they have hastened to build more equipment, the
difficulty of getting material has held up the placing of the
additional freight cars in service. As a notable example of what the
railroads are doing, it might be mentioned that the Santa Fe and
other Western roads are sending trains of empties back to the
automobile centers instead of holding them at their destinations for
loads to take back.

In line with the endeavors of the railroads, the car makers are
instructing
their dealers that under no circumstances must they use the freight
cars for storage of their machines, but they must unload them
immediately on arrival. In the past this has been one cause of delay
in getting the cars back, but it is believed that this situation has
greatly improved, for the dealers recognize the need of cooperation
for the good of all concerned.

A considerable factor in the present dearth of freight cars is the
tie-up in the East, according to one of the traffic men here. His
concern has sixty-nine carloads tied up in Norfolk, Va., waiting to
be loaded on steamers, and doubtless there are many other such
instances. There is no place to store the automobiles pending their
being put on the ships, and consequently they are letting them lie in
the freight cars. This is quite prevalent at all the export points,
and is being practised by many of the makers. Due to this and other
causes of congestion in the East, the Lake Shore, for instance, has
been holding up shipments for eastern points as far back on its lines
as Toledo. Then, too, other industries are demanding a great many
cars, war shipments are very large, and the whole combination of
circumstances at the present time is making it a puzzle to move the
output. One day last week, as an instance, there were only fifteen
automobile freight cars received in the whole city of Detroit. That,
however, was an exceptionally bad day.

Shipping Costs More

A sidelight on the very serious shipping situation is the added cost
to the car makers of each car shipped due to the troubles they have
to go through in utilizing other than automobile box cars. Whenever
flats have to be pressed into service, there is an additional item of
expense where tarpaulins are used, for these have to be sent back to
the factory. If it is necessary to box in a gondola car, there is a
large cost item to be considered. Loading crews must be larger, and
this adds to the cost. Taking everything into consideration, one big
shipper of cars said that it costs from $2 to $3 more per -automobile
to ship them than it did when conditions were better and it was
easier to get the right sort of freight equipment.
It is indeed deplorable that at a time when it seems impossible to
meet the demand for cars, the makers should be handicapped by the
shipping trouble. It has meant, and will continue to mean,
curtailment of the production of cars to adjust the output to
transportation facilities.


Re: Bruce Smith's boiler - was Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions

Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Jeff Aley:
In my later conversation with Ted Culotta, he indicated
that he didn't have that problem. Tom Madden noted that the
rivets are on Microscale decal film; perhaps you got a batch
with "old" film?
Bruce Smith:
It's possible, and I have a newer batch of rivets from Archer for
use on a pass... (can't say that word on this list <G>) car, so
I'll see how it goes.
Technology is rolling stock neutral, no need to be inhibited by being a
closet passenger car modeler. I routinely work with 8 to 10 scale foot
lengths of the smallest Archer rivets, laying single strips of them
across the width of Pullman clerestory roofs. Absolutely no problems
with the strips breaking up, in fact I straightem them out by pinning
one end of a strip to the roof edge with a tweezer tip and pulling
gently on the other end. Sounds like you got a bad sheet.

Tom Madden


Re: Model Rail Hobbyist - online magazine

Raymond Young
 

Marty,

Somehow I missed the link to download the magazine.  Would you give it again?

Virgil Young
Amarillo, TX




________________________________
From: cvsne <mjmcguirk@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2009 9:51:45 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Model Rail Hobbyist - online magazine


Appreciate the feedback, but before our esteemed moderator sees this
please keep the feedback on MRH to the STMFC list specific to steam era
freight car prototype and modeling subjects . . . what should be
covered, how it may be covered in this new media format, etc . . .

Any comments on the magazine in general are welcomed but please direct
to me off list at mjmcguirk@comcast. net

Thanks,

Marty



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Roundhouse/MDC metal cars

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

The HO Ulrich/Walthers GS drop-bottom gon is very similar, and can be
modified to be almost dead accurate, to CN 40' Enterprise GS gons.
Many CN modellers keep an eye out for these at train shows and the like!

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@> wrote:

Ulrich had a metal drop bottom GS gon. Did MDC/Roundhouse have a drop
bottom gon as well??

Tom Madden
Oops! The Ulrich gon is what I had in mind.
Gene Green


Re: Bruce Smith's boiler - was Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions

leakinmywaders
 

Bruce and Jeff:

I've manipulated Archer rivets in narrow, continuous strips up to 12
scale feet long with ease, working on HO freight car sides. So it
seems there is definitely something amiss with the decal film on your
set. I've been most impressed by the durability and workability of the
decal film of my Archer rivet sheets, and by how well it settles and
dissolved without visible edges with a couple shots of Microsol or one
of Champ solvent.

If you're having those problems you should send the sheet back to
Archer with a note, he seems quite responsive to customer concerns.

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Aley, Jeff A" <Jeff.A.Aley@...> wrote:

Bruce,

In my later conversation with Ted Culotta, he indicated
that he didn't have that problem. Tom Madden noted that the rivets
are on Microscale decal film; perhaps you got a batch with "old" film?

I hope that Ted or Tom can offer their additional
comments on using these rivets.

Regards,

-Jeff


________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 6:17 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Bruce Smith's boiler - was Prototype Rails 2009
-- my opinions


As I
told Jeff, visions of putting long strips of 50 rivets on at a time
were quickly dashed as around 8-10 rivet strips were really the
maximum that can be handled.
Regards
Bruce




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: X43C side sills

SUVCWORR@...
 

In a message dated 1/15/2009 10:45:59 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
cinderandeight@aol.com writes:

<snip>

X43 cars were acquired in two distinct groups. Five digit cars were
bought the old fashion way with car trusts, while six digit cars were
leased. A
small triangle appears between the car number and road name to indicate
"segregated maintenance" of the leased cars. I've never seen exactly what
different
maintenance program applied to these cars were, but when the leases ran out
they were all collected together in Hubbard, OH and cut up as a group (with
a
lot of "triangle" X44 cars too). I was told by the wrecking crews that the
hard
wood flooring in the cars was "brand new" and selling for a pretty penny to
dealers.


The leased cars where leased from Chicago Car. The triangle was for
accounting purposes. The terms of the lease provided that all repairs were
chargeable back to the lessor. This information was gathered by Dick Schweiger when
C&BT shops introduced the X43 family in the late 80's.

Rich Orr
**************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
steps!
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cemailfooterNO62)


Re: Bruce Smith's boiler - was Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions

Bruce Smith
 

On Jan 15, 2009, at 11:38 AM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:

Bruce,

In my later conversation with Ted Culotta, he indicated that he didn't have that problem. Tom Madden noted that the rivets are on Microscale decal film; perhaps you got a batch with "old" film?
Its possible, and I have a newer batch of rivets from Archer for use on a pass... (can't say that word on this list <G>) car, so I'll see how it goes.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Bruce Smith's boiler - was Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions

Aley, Jeff A
 

Bruce,

In my later conversation with Ted Culotta, he indicated that he didn't have that problem. Tom Madden noted that the rivets are on Microscale decal film; perhaps you got a batch with "old" film?

I hope that Ted or Tom can offer their additional comments on using these rivets.

Regards,

-Jeff


________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 6:17 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Bruce Smith's boiler - was Prototype Rails 2009 -- my opinions


As I
told Jeff, visions of putting long strips of 50 rivets on at a time
were quickly dashed as around 8-10 rivet strips were really the
maximum that can be handled.
Regards
Bruce


Re: Roundhouse/MDC metal cars

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Gene, Don and Fred,

MDC offered two 40' cast metal gondolas. One was a high-side car, and was offered both with flat and heap-shield (C&O) ends. IIRC, this car had a multi-piece body, with the floor, ends, and sides as separate castings which allowed the different ends to be mated with the same sides and floor. This car was later carried over into plastic with flat ends and using a die-cast underframe (same as was used on their 1960s-1970s plastic boxcars).

Their other gon was a low-side, possibly of Erie prototype. It was also offered lettered for Southern, but has the wrong number of ribs for their low-sides. I still have one of these in my collection.

Kind regards,


Garth

Frederick Freitas wrote:

Guyz,
Are we confusing this with the Mantua zamak frame, pressed metal formed body, gondola that came out in the early 50's ?? I still have mine, with updated details.
Fred Freitas

--- On Thu, 1/15/09, Don Smith <rgs0554@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Don Smith <rgs0554@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Roundhouse/MDC metal cars
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, January 15, 2009, 10:59 AM






Hi Gene, Tom and all,
This is a very fuzzy memory. I (very) vaguely remember working on a fixed bottom Roundhouse (MDC) metal gon. It may have been a transition car where the body was a plastic molding and the underframe was a die casting. Again, an even fuzzier memory of it originally being an all zamac diecast car. I think the prototype or at least the lettering was for C&O. Regards, Don Smith


Re: Model Rail Hobbyist - online magazine

Charlie Vlk
 

Bill and STMFC-

Welcome to the greater non-HO world....... you may, like Z, N, S, and O Scalers been doing for decades, have to approach an article for its inspiration, prototype information, and general modeling techniques.
We've had to learn to tolerate the endless (often assumed default) references to HO and HO product placement in the general magazines.

I would encourage the e-magazine to "publish" reference material that would otherwise never see the light of day....raw prototype source drawings (builders general arrangement and detail plans,
equipment diagrams, etc..).

Please forgo all the dazzling graphics and animation..... just because it can be done doesn't mean it should be. Don't use every font, special effect, and sound available. Chose Substance over Appearance. I believe (hope!!!) that Model Railroaders have better than average attention spans and don't have to be enticed by dazzle.... the trains should be enough. We already have "Slick" publications where Sales, Marketing and Graphics people decide the content of each month's issue. I'd rather see some rougher articles and photos of stuff that the author thinks is neet that conveys a passionate interst than the final, finished railroad of a rich or dead guy or some torn-down one. And I don't mind seeing unfinished portions of a layout or a cluttered basement in the background either..... that is the real world and I fear that the "perfect" railroads we see in print intimidate more than inspire.

While we have been getting some good Steam Era Freight Car coverage in the major magazines, the electronic format certainly allows presentation of any material that supports the article. A balance
will have to be determined where such information "belongs".... in e- or print magazines, in books, reference publications (RPC, etc.), and on forums such as this, or in railroad historical society bulletins or e-bulletins.

It is all good...the more information that is brought out into the public domain the better.... history is preserved best by dissemination, not being locked up in some archives or in a private collection in somebody's basement!

Charlie Vlk


If I have one constructive comment on the magazine, it would be that to my admittedly HO-biased mind most of the scale-specific articles seemed to be about N scale or (OK, it was an incredible layout) large scale. I realize that any hobby magazine - particularly a start-up - is limited by what articles they have submitted to them, so this is not meant as a condemnation. I hope that the editors will keep an eye out for more HO content in the future.

Bill Schneider

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