Date   

Re: modeling cable on a crane

Greg Martin
 

I have found that quilting thread is the best to simulate cable in HO Scale. It doesn't have the "fuzz" that other thread has. You can generally find a nice dark brown that works real well and their are different thicknesses.

Greg Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, 22 Jan 2009 1:59 am
Subject: [STMFC] modeling cable on a crane






I have a Barnhart log loader (a type of crane) that I am working on. Does anyone have a good suggestion for what to use to model the cable?

I bought some thread for model ship building but was disappointed. Despite the description, it had fuzz. Apparently modelers use beeswax to cut down on the fuzz but that seems like it would make it look even less like a cable.

I also thought of using some fine gauge wire, excess from a dcc decoder for example, and strip off the insulation. While this gives a good look, my fear is the slightest jostling and the cable will get visible kinks.

Part of the problem is the "hook", actually more of a tong, is very light. This means there is very little weight to pull the cable tight.

This must be a common problem for anyone who has modeled a crane. Any suggestions? Is there a group specifically for modeling MOW
equipment?

Thanks,

Ned Carey


NYC municipal photo archives

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., " Westerfield" <westerfield@...> wrote:
"....... a limited number of photos are now on their web site and more
are being added all the time.

Whose web site? NYC? WNYE? A specific program by name with a web site?

Al, have you ever gone through the photos? There must be millions.

Ed


Re: Resin kit problems...

Andy Carlson
 

Resin (polyurethane) manufacturers are numerous, and so many resin variations are available to suit their clients with a challenging array of different production situations that few generalizations can be made. Not all, and perhaps not even"Most" resins are white. A white resin tends to be a more expensive resin. Off-whites and yellows are frequently less expensive. I have used products from Permatex and later from B&J of Tustin, CA that were yellow. These were offered as economical alternatives, and Permatex's was called "Castmaster"(if my memory can be trusted). I stepped up to the pure whites for two reasons-tinting to grey and reduced shrinking. I paid an extra $30.00/gallon kit for these options. Properties of resin include mixing viscosity, pot life, demold time, shrinking rates, cured resin hardness, bubble retention,temperature exposure ranges, and more. The challenge is to get the properties most important, for finding a perfect resin is
unlikely.

The service reps also talk about how heat curing many of the resins makes for a more stable part with less chance of post mold-removal warping, though not all resins have this heat curing property.

One generalization that I will make, most of today's resin casters are using a product which gives them useful parts. The junk resins are mostly not used. Cured resin is very stable, and future anthropologists may find religious icons of 20th century train gods in old landfills, still recognized as railroad cars and sharing space with plastic water bottles.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- On Thu, 1/22/09, Denny Anspach <danspach@...> wrote:
2) Color is no clue as to resin quality. Normal color is
white, but
because this color causes such perception problems (the end
user often
cannot perceive sufficient detail to properly orient or fit
parts- a
problem shared by many with all-black styrene parts!), a
color
additive (commonly shades of gray) is added to the resin
mix.


Re: Lindberg Line

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Mark Feddersen asked:
"Do any of the old Lindberg Line freight cars, specifically the wood
stock car, reefer, flat car or gon have any redeeming value as a
kitbash/update project anymore or have they been surpassed by newer
technology?"

The stock car and gon represent prototypes that have not been covered
by other kits. The stock car appears to be based on an Eric Stevens
model of a 38 ft RDG prototype that appeared in "Dollar Car: Building
a Stock Car" in the September 1953 issue of Model Railroader.
Lindberg "stretched" this model to a taller 40 ft car, which
coincidentally is quite close to sevral series of MILW stock cars.
See John Swanson's "Build a Milwuakee Road Stockcar" in the January
1991 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman. A Soph Marty prototype photo
and a photo of a model that I did about ten years ago is on the pay
side of the RPI website at
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/displayimage.php?i=21938#
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/displayimage.php?i=21997#

The gon is an Erie prototype, 2000 built by Standard Steel Car Co. in
1923-1924. 749 were rebuilt with sawtooth hoppers in 1934. Richard
Reichenbach's did an article on these cars in a past issue of the
ELHS' publication. (My photocopy of the article has the date cut
off. Maybe one of the Erie guys can help you out with the date of
the article.) The 1925 CBC also has a builders photo of these cars.
These were large gons - 44 ft IL - and were used mainly for hauling
coal.

The flat car and reefer aren't as useful. The flat car has a very
thick deck with an integral crate load. It's different than the
Athearn flat as it has 12 stake pockets, but I really haven't put
much effort into figuring out what this model is closest to which
prototype. The steel reefer is a bigger question mark - it has 8-
panel steel sides with a rivet pattern analagous to that of an early
steel boxcar, and ends resembling pre-war Pullman proprietary ends.
I'm at a loss to what this prototype may be. The height appears to
be between that of 8 ft 7 in and 10 ft IH car, so the model might be
a starting point for a tween-war NYC auto boxcar.

All of these models were subsequently offered by Mantua in
their "Heavies" line, and some have be re-intorduced by Model Power.


Ben Hom


Re: Calling All SAL B-6 Models

Thomas Baker
 

John,

I did one in S scale kitbashed from an American Models kit of a box car that was not a very accurate model of anything. I guess in some ways American Models box cars are the Athearn cars of S. I will include a brief description of what I did, nothing you need to include in your article, just information you need to know.

Tom

________________________________

From: STMFC@... on behalf of John Golden
Sent: Thu 1/22/2009 12:05 PM
To: stmfc@...; rpm-forum@...
Subject: [STMFC] Calling All SAL B-6 Models



Gentlemen,

In the upcoming issue of the Seaboard-Coast Line Modeler magazine--the quarterly, online modeling magazine of the ACL & SAL Historical Society--I'm going to write a short article on Seaboard's B-6 box cars ("1932 ARA" cars, series 17000-18999).

I'd like to include photos of your models in the article. If you have a B-6 completed from the Sunshine kit, the new Atlas model, or something else (kitbashed from a Red Caboose X29, for example), and you would like me to include it in the article, please send me photos and a caption at Golden1014@.... I'll get 'em in!

Thank you!
John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Resin kit problems...

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

This has been a very interesting discussion, not the least reason being the obvious authoritative expertise, and the impressive empirical data that has come forth. If I can summarize what I think I have taken away so far, it would be this (corrections/refinements invited):

1) Any given resin quality is closely tied to the knowledge, care, timing and meticulousness with which the resin has been prepared and mixed by the caster.

2) Color is no clue as to resin quality. Normal color is white, but because this color causes such perception problems (the end user often cannot perceive sufficient detail to properly orient or fit parts- a problem shared by many with all-black styrene parts!), a color additive (commonly shades of gray) is added to the resin mix.

3) Cast resin cars have every good reason to look forward to a very long life.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Calling All SAL B-6 Models

golden1014
 

Gentlemen,
 
In the upcoming issue of the Seaboard-Coast Line Modeler magazine--the quarterly, online modeling magazine of the ACL & SAL Historical Society--I'm going to write a short article on Seaboard's B-6 box cars ("1932 ARA" cars, series 17000-18999). 
 
I'd like to include photos of your models in the article.  If you have a B-6 completed from the Sunshine kit, the new Atlas model, or something else (kitbashed from a Red Caboose X29, for example), and you would like me to include it in the article, please send me photos and a caption at Golden1014@....  I'll get 'em in!
 
Thank you!
John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Galvanized roofs

water.kresse@...
 

We used it at work on bare steel prototype automobile underbodies as a primmer.  Small orders of galv steel sheets with special strength properies are not that easy to coordinate (you end up ordering a coated  coil and then reselling it back as general steel to press-break parts folks as overkill material).  It required a hazzardous material sheet to bring it into the shop and had to be used rather quickly after opening up the cans. 



It is the real stuff but is the spangle size scale enough?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: RUTLANDRS@...
To: STMFC@..., steameraweathering@..., "JRD Members" <JRD_Members@...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2009 3:01:30 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Galvanized roofs

All,
    Was in a friends workshop today and saw a spray can  on a shelf, it was
CRC Industrial Zinc Re-Nu Cold Galvanize. I sprayed some onto  a piece of white
paper (all that was available) and there it was the EXACT color  of a new
galvanized roof. It might attack styrene, but I don't know.
    He is not sure as to where he bought it, but  thought that it was a
Tru-Value hardware store. You might try a home improvement  store if interested.
Chuck Hladik
Rutland Railroad
Virginia Division
**************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
steps!
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cemailfooterNO62)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New Intermountain Cars

Bruce Smith
 

On Jan 22, 2009, at 8:41 AM, devansprr wrote:

Several of the Cocoa Beach/RPM posts mentioned prototypes of two new
IM cars - a 70t AAR flat, and a War Emergency box.

IM's site now lists 4 of the flats scheduled for May/Jun delivery, in
roads ATSF, B&O, Erie and New Haven.

My '43 ORER only shows the Erie flats (50 cars). Was this car produced
in quantity during WWII, or was it primarily a post war car (in
numbers produced). Does anyone know if the ATSF, B&O, and New Haven
bought these flats during'43 & '44?
Thanks for any help - trying to balance a WWII fleet.
Dave,

Both the Sunshine kit insert and the Proto-west web page (http:// www.protowestmodels.com/ProtoWest_HO_Kits.htm) have fairly detailed histories for the 70 ton AAR car. From the web site I get:

ATSF (200, class Ft-V, 3/44)
DTI (50 cars, 1942)
New Haven (100, 1944)
NYC (500, 1942-43 and 500, 1950)
IHB (100, 1943)
Pere Marquette (350, WWII? and 1950?)
Wabash (50, 1944)
Baltimore & Ohio (?, 1951?)
Erie/Erie Lackawanna (200?, 1952)
CRP/CNJ (100?, date?)

I hope IM will be running other road names, and of course, undec kits, for those who cannot wait! With the paucity of WWII models of 70 ton flats (the PRR F30A is the only other one that comes to mind), these may have to be represented in higher percentages than would be seen nationally as "stand-ins" for other 70 ton flats. Clearly, the NYC fleet should be represented, perhaps by more than one car, and a DTI car can be used (perhaps with a home-road load from the Detroit Tank Arsenal? Finally, ATSF, NH, PM, Wab and CRP can be included if the dates work, however, my memory says that several of the "1944" cars were past my June cut-off so they are no-go for me.


Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
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Re: New Intermountain Cars

Ed Hawkins
 

On Jan 22, 2009, at 8:41 AM, devansprr wrote:

My '43 ORER only shows the Erie flats (50 cars). Was this car produced
in quantity during WWII, or was it primarily a post war car (in
numbers produced). Does anyone know if the ATSF, B&O, and New Haven
bought these flats during'43 & '44?

For the War Emergency Box cars, Ted Culotta's Steam Era Freight Car
Reference Manual Vol I shows several of these cars starting on pg.
161. Most of the production runs cited are in the 100-500 car range,
and the majority seem to be PS built in '44. Is there a source that
describes the quantities of these cars in more detail?
Dave,
The earliest 70-ton AAR flat cars I know of were built 2-41 by
Greenville Steel Car Co. for Erie (8000-8049). Erie added 8050-8099
built 3-42 and 8100-8199 built in 1952. ATSF had 200 cars 91500-91699
built 3-44 by Pullman-Standard. B&O had 725 cars in various series
starting in the 8000-series built 1948-1956 (many got reconfigured and
renumbered during the 1950s). NH had 100 cars 17300-17399 built 10-44
built by Greenville. The 725 B&O cars were built at their company shops
using kits provided by Greenville.

Other roads owning cars of this design included CRP (later CNJ) 101-200
built 10-44 by Greenville; DT&I 900-949 built 10-42 by Greenville; IHB
8000-8099 built 1943 by Despatch Shops; NYC 499300-500299 built in 3
groups in 1942, 1943, and 1950 by Despatch Shops; PM 16500-16749 built
12-42 and 16750-16849 built 9-44 by Greenville (later reassigned to C&O
by adding a "2" in front of original car numbers); WAB 25500-25549
built 1944 by Wabash.

A number of these cars were modified during the 1950s for trailer
service and some were modified by adding bulkheads. The November 1988
and July 1992 Mainline Modeler had a drawing of the Erie car.

For the emergency box cars, refer to Mainline Modeler August and
September 1994.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


New Intermountain Cars

devansprr
 

Several of the Cocoa Beach/RPM posts mentioned prototypes of two new
IM cars - a 70t AAR flat, and a War Emergency box.

IM's site now lists 4 of the flats scheduled for May/Jun delivery, in
roads ATSF, B&O, Erie and New Haven.

My '43 ORER only shows the Erie flats (50 cars). Was this car produced
in quantity during WWII, or was it primarily a post war car (in
numbers produced). Does anyone know if the ATSF, B&O, and New Haven
bought these flats during'43 & '44?

For the War Emergency Box cars, Ted Culotta's Steam Era Freight Car
Reference Manual Vol I shows several of these cars starting on pg.
161. Most of the production runs cited are in the 100-500 car range,
and the majority seem to be PS built in '44. Is there a source that
describes the quantities of these cars in more detail?

Thanks for any help - trying to balance a WWII fleet.

Dave Evans


Re: Galvanized roofs

feddersenmark
 

I always add a bit of dark blue to the mix as most older, weathered
galvanized material has a definitive bluish hue, especially on
buildings. Mark Feddersen





--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee"
<schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Chuck Hladik wrote:
Was in a friends workshop today and saw a spray can on a shelf,
it was CRC Industrial Zinc Re-Nu Cold Galvanize. I sprayed some
onto
a piece of white paper (all that was available) and there it
was the
EXACT color of a new galvanized roof.
Probably newly exposed galvanized has this look for as much as
several weeks. It then gets pretty gray. Personal opinion:
modelers who
portray bright, silvery galvanized roofs haven't seen many in
service.

Tony Thompson
My best success for this color was Floquil Old Silver and Reefer
Gray, 50/50, maybe a little more
gray. It looks gray but there is a bit of reflectivity to it.

SGL


Re: Galvanized roofs

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Friends,

I asked this question when most of you were away at Cocoa Beach, and didn't get a single nibble. So now I will try again since this thread is relevant.

I recently bought one of the Intermountain Milwaukee rib-side boxcars. These are the later cars built in the late 1940s or so (sorry, the car is at home, so I can't check the number or build date). The body, including the roof and running board on the model are paint freight car red. I looked through several articles from back magazines on rib-side cars in my files, and cannot find any data on the roofs for the later cars, though some earlier cars show roofs that were unpainted galvanized metal.

Can does anybody have a photo or other data that can confirm the roof color on this later car?

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff


Re: modeling cable on a crane

Bruce Smith
 

On Jan 22, 2009, at 3:59 AM, Ned Carey wrote:

I have a Barnhart log loader (a type of crane) that I am working on. Does anyone have a good suggestion for what to use to model the cable?
<SNIP>

This must be a common problem for anyone who has modeled a crane. Any suggestions? Is there a group specifically for modeling MOW
equipment?
Ned,

I used EZ-line from Berkshire Junction (http:// www.berkshirejunction.com/) to rig my crawler crane. It has the advantage of being flexible so I can have the boom up or down. It is a monofilament so it looks like cable, not thread. I also use this for the cable tie-downs on many of my loads.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: modeling  cable on a crane

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 1/22/09 2:07:27 AM, nedspam@... writes:


This must be a common problem for anyone who has modeled a crane. Any
suggestions? Is there a group specifically for modeling MOW
equipment?
Suggest you go to a local yardage store and look for rayon or nylon thread.
Pick a weight and color of your choice.

eric


**************
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modeling cable on a crane

Ned Carey <nedspam@...>
 

I have a Barnhart log loader (a type of crane) that I am working on. Does anyone have a good suggestion for what to use to model the cable?

I bought some thread for model ship building but was disappointed. Despite the description, it had fuzz. Apparently modelers use beeswax to cut down on the fuzz but that seems like it would make it look even less like a cable.

I also thought of using some fine gauge wire, excess from a dcc decoder for example, and strip off the insulation. While this gives a good look, my fear is the slightest jostling and the cable will get visible kinks.

Part of the problem is the "hook", actually more of a tong, is very light. This means there is very little weight to pull the cable tight.

This must be a common problem for anyone who has modeled a crane. Any suggestions? Is there a group specifically for modeling MOW
equipment?

Thanks,

Ned Carey


Re: Galvanized roofs

asychis@...
 

One paint I usedthat seems to fit the bill is Scalecoat graphite and oil.
It is a flat grayish silver.

Jerry Michels
**************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
steps!
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Re: Galvanized roofs

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
My best success for this color was Floquil Old Silver and Reefer Gray, 50/50, maybe a little more gray. It looks gray but there is a bit of reflectivity to it.
Sounds about right. I like to have a few areas near the paint edges a bit reflective, areas farther from those edges dead gray.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Video of yard switching

tmolsen@...
 

Dave and List,

Someone has posted a segment of a DVD from the PRR Power series that is currently sold by Railroad Video of Leola Pa.

The locomotive in the video is an L1s Class 2-8-2 that is consolidating a draft of cars in the eastbound receiving yard at Enola Pa. If you had seen the entire segment on the DVD, you would see the l1s making the draft solid, then backing off to another track and an I1sa Class 2-10-0 coupling to the rear of the draft and begin to shove it over the Eastbound hump to classify the cars. I cannot remember which one of the PRR Power series this is in as I have three of the sets issued. There is a long segment of I1s engines assigned to hump duty (1956) shoving cars over the Enola Eastbound hump classifing cars.

There are many good shots of the freight cars in the drafts being humped. It looks like a Sunshine kit catalog!

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...


Lindberg Line

feddersenmark
 

Do any of the old Lindberg Line freight cars, specifically the wood
stock car, reefer, flat car or gon have any redeeming value as a
kitbash/update project anymore or have they been surpassed by newer
technology? I'm going to the Central City, Iowa train show this Sunday
and wish to sell them if they are of no use. Thank you. Mark
Feddersen

114901 - 114920 of 193482