Date   

Re: tank car question

mopacfirst
 

In the pressure vessel business, that thing that supports the manway
flange would be called a 'davit'. Typically it's specified for any
flanges that are too heavy for one man to handle, which often means
100 lb or more.

Manway flanges were once as small as 16" or 18" nominal size, now are
normally 24", but workers are bigger now.

Ron Merrick


--- In STMFC@..., William Keene <wakeene@...> wrote:

Tim,

That is an ALCO switcher...oh... you mean that round thingy...
looks
like a bolted flange for a clean out hatch. Note that it has a
support
structure for when it is in the open position. Not sure what would
be
the load or why such a clean out procedure would be required.
Very
interesting none the less.

Cheers,
-- Bill Keene
Irvine, Ca


On Feb 25, 2009, at 9:55 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

what is the odd device on the end of this tank car?
http://tbn0.google.com/hosted/images/c?q=eb8dfb80ba8b6c72_large

Tim O'Connor


ADMIN: Multiple messages

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Over the last week I have received multiple copies of a few Email messages coming through my server Earthlink. The messages all come from Yahoo Groups and all but one is a member of the STMFC. Earthlink is researching the source code of the messages in order to determine the cause. In support of that, I would like to ask if anyone else has received multiple messages. If so, please let me know but OFF GROUP at:

brockm@....

Thanks.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Single-sheathed box cars

sparachuk <sparachuk@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "pierreoliver2003" <pierre.oliver@>
wrote:

Jeff,
I'm going to jump in here and mention that for all of the holes I
drill in resin , I use a Dremel Mini-Mite. A battery powered moto-
tool.
If you're careful and use the right feed rate and speed you can also
successfully use this tool for styrene as well.
Drilling 36 holes becomes a job of mere minutes.
Pierre Oliver
Interesting. My son uses a similar technique. He regulates the speed
by choosing batteries already run down by the appropriate amount.
Gene Green
Gene: I had a friend in the eighties who would regulate the speed of
his Dremel by wiring light bulb sockets in series with the tool. By
screwing in different sized bulbs he could get different speeds. Yes I
know that's doing it the hard way but that was the sort of fellow he was.

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Re: nice freight yard details

rwitt_2000
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

I'll bet not too many layouts have a guy sitting on
a chair next to the yard throat, ready to throw that
switch...

http://tbn0.google.com/hosted/images/c?q=63aa8efb7477cb32_large

It's a 1942 view of an SP yard -- note the three PRR
box cars on the far track, and the 50' single sheathed
box car.

Tim O'Connor

It is a "slip-switch" he's manually operating. Not the usual
arrangement for a yard throat.

A nice find Tim.

Bob Witt


Re: Single-sheathed box cars

Steve SANDIFER
 

A sewing machine foot pedal on a fixed speed dremel mounted in the drill press works well to drill holes in plastic or resin steam era freight cars.

----------------------------------------------------------------
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Dr., Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417
Personal: http://www.geocities.com/stevesandifer2000/index
Church: http://www.swcentral.org

----- Original Message -----
From: Gene Green
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 2:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Single-sheathed box cars


--- In STMFC@..., "pierreoliver2003" <pierre.oliver@...>
wrote:
>
> Jeff,
> I'm going to jump in here and mention that for all of the holes I
> drill in resin , I use a Dremel Mini-Mite. A battery powered moto-
tool.
> If you're careful and use the right feed rate and speed you can also
> successfully use this tool for styrene as well.
> Drilling 36 holes becomes a job of mere minutes.
> Pierre Oliver

Interesting. My son uses a similar technique. He regulates the speed
by choosing batteries already run down by the appropriate amount.
Gene Green


Re: MWR Mather box car under wires

Tim O'Connor
 

So now we know they made it to the east coast in 1950! :-)
http://tbn0.google.com/hosted/images/c?q=872ee5b6fc6c5a02_large
At least to the New Haven, judging by the catenary support. But
where on the NH and what is the neat 50 ft., single door car with
the Murphy ends behind the support?
Regards, Don Valentine

Great Northern, Westerfield kit.


Re: coke

WaltGCox@...
 

In a message dated 2/26/2009 8:09:33 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
ed_mines@... writes:

<Where there regions where dealers sold both soft or hard coal for
home heating? I know industrial customers generally used soft coal in
areas where homeowners used anthracite.>

I would very much doubt it. I remember bringing home a bag of bituminous
coal from the steam era railroad track in my neighborhood. My mom only used a
little of it and I don't think I have ever seen or smelled such a noxious cloud
of smoke as we had in our kitchen that day. Walt
**************A Good Credit Score is 700 or Above. See yours in just 2 easy
steps!
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Re: coke -- a consumer product in 1950?

Tim O'Connor
 

Kurt

Aha! That was during the Great Ice Storm of 2008, when
I lost my internet connection for 26 days... so I missed
out when this was discussed. Sorry about that.

Tim O'Connor

At 2/26/2009 08:47 AM Thursday, you wrote:
See message 78111 and subsequent.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/message/78111
KL


Re: Walthers 40' AAR Steel Box

David North <davenorth@...>
 

Dave,
You didn't say if your kit was a one-piece plastic cast body with molded
on ladders, etc. Do the side sills stick out slightly from the body
panels? If so, I suspect what you have is the Walthers reissue of an old
Train Miniature car from about 20 years ago. Most of these cars are
pretty hokey by today's standards.
Garth G. Groff



Sounds like the ex-Train Miniature x29/ARA car. If so, it's going to be
a pretty low height car and I'm not sure correct as that number equates
to a 10'6" IH car in my 1950 ORER
Jerry Glow





Yep, that sounds like it guys. Looks like I'll be letting it go via ebay.

It is pretty hokey but I was prepared to put some work in if basically
correct.

Thanks for your help.

Cheers

Dave


Re: Michigan Central door and a half DS boxcars

sparachuk <sparachuk@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., " Westerfield" <westerfield@...> wrote:

Stephan - My decal set 7902 is the exact lettering for the car - I
issued a new version of the kit several years ago. See the decal
section of www.westerfield.biz. - Al Westerfield
----- Original Message -----
From: sparachuk
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 11:05 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Michigan Central door and a half DS boxcars

Al: Thanks. I am using some decals I got with Westerfield cars I
already have, sort of a clean out the spare decal box project.

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Re: gondola question

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 26, 2009, at 3:25 AM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD wrote:
The C&O and Clinchfield are the only two I can think of that had
those ends.
There were others with extended height ends, such as NYC and P&LE
but they
were not peaked.





N&W also had a bunch, both corrugated and Dreadnaught.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: tank car question

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 26, 2009, at 7:46 AM, Andy Carlson wrote:
Notice that the 2 CISX cars are 4 course tank cars. Maybe Bob Gould
should have done this car.




It was Bill, not Bob, and yes, he should have. But then, it's an
early AC&F Type 21, which is the car that Life-Like modeled very well.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: tank car question

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Ned Carey" <nedspam@...> commented:
c.. Seeing a person in close proximity to the manway, I am
surprised how small the manways were. It must have been a squeeze to
get into a car.



In the early '80s I worked for small specialy chemical manfacturer
Kay-Fries in Stony Point, NY.

One night I was surprised to see welding arc light coming out the top
of a reactor with a flanged opening much smaller than the one at the
end of the tank car. The man inside turned out to the oldest (and
smallest) man in the shop.

It must have been scary going into that tank car for the first time.

I'm surprised more tank cars didn't have clean out hatches.

I think it was common for men to go into covered hoppers.

Ed


Re: coke -- a consumer product in 1950?

Bill Darnaby
 

FWIW, on page 10 of Morning Sun's CNW Vol 1 is a very neat 1945 photo that shows an all purpose fuel dealer in the background advertising coke.

Bill Darnaby


Re: Michigan Central door and a half DS boxcars

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Stephan - My decal set 7902 is the exact lettering for the car - I issued a new version of the kit several years ago. See the decal section of www.westerfield.biz. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: sparachuk
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 11:05 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Michigan Central door and a half DS boxcars


I need help lettering an old Storzek door and a half kit. The one that
I have came without the lettering, sad to say. I don't know the lot
number and I'm uncertain about CAPY, LD WT, LT WT. I've seen a photo
showing 80,000, 88,000, 43,300 with T-section trucks but the
instruction sheet shows "Bettendorf" trucks and 50 ton CAPY. Any ideas
anyone? Thanks.

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Re: Kadee minimum body box widths and #4 couplers

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

... the #4 had a slot in the coupler shank that was behind the
square post that held the coupler in its pocket and there was a
spring that
fit into that slot. BUT, and what has not been stated here, is that
there was also a very small cylindrical piece of metal that fit
INSIDE that spring to provide limits to coupler travel.
I didn't mention that *&%$### subatomic-sized cylindrical filler
piece that has to be placed inside the spring sunokt because I felt I
was already pushing the envelope already in attempting to describe the
#4's venerable but unusual coupler shank centering arrangement. If
memory serves, this tiny cylinder was also a later addition by Kadee
some years following Kadee's shift to magnetic couplers, while other
aspects of the design remained unchanged. BTW, the coupler seems to
operate quite well if this cylinder is left out, i.e. as in, it has
already flown off the bench into a netherworld.

As implied, assembling the couplers with this miniscule little piece
was and still is no picnic. Once assembled, the coupler box/coupler is
treated with the highest respect.

Denny


Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Michigan Central door and a half DS boxcars

sparachuk <sparachuk@...>
 

I need help lettering an old Storzek door and a half kit. The one that
I have came without the lettering, sad to say. I don't know the lot
number and I'm uncertain about CAPY, LD WT, LT WT. I've seen a photo
showing 80,000, 88,000, 43,300 with T-section trucks but the
instruction sheet shows "Bettendorf" trucks and 50 ton CAPY. Any ideas
anyone? Thanks.

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Re: coke -- a consumer product in 1950?

Rob M.
 

The Harold Cox book "Surface Cars of Philadelphia" (ca 1963/4/5) has
a photo of a PTC streetcar with a "Koppers Coke - Order a ton today"
advertisement.

I don't have the book handy and I can'tt recall the car type or the
year on the photo (whic was likely pre 1960's) but it would imply
that Koppers had some type of a market for residential coke in the
Philly area and thus received coke deliveries somewhere by rail.

R. Mondichak

--- In STMFC@..., "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., michael bishop <goldrod_1@> wrote:

Koppers Coke was the largest producer of house-heating coke. Coke
as
a home heating fuel began to diminish after World War II.

http://www.koppers.com/htm/OurCo_Heri_OldBD.html
 
MIchael Bishop
Coke shares one important trait with Anthracite (hard) coal; it
burns
with no smoke, since all the volatiles have already been distilled
out. I don't know how it priced compared to Anthracite, but in some
parts of the country it may have been competitive.

Before the entire nation was piped for natural gas, coke was the
fuel
of choice for forges and industrial ovens, especially in metal
working, where exposure to the gasses generated by burning coal
could
change the sulfur content of the metal.

When I was a kid, the neighbor boys and their dad, all very
technically minded, built a miniature crucible furnace for sand
casting aluminum and copper alloys (it didn't produce enough heat to
do ferrous alloys). Built in a 15 pound grease can lined with fire
clay, it was fired with coke and the fire blown with an old
Electrolux
vacuum cleaner with the hose on the outlet side.

They obtained their coke supply by bartering something for a half
bag
of coke from a Water Department crew that had their wagon parked on
a
repair job in the neighborhood. The Water Dept. guys used coke to
keep
their "fire can" heater going without smoking up the job site,
possibly also to keep a solder pot hot.

Lots of uses for small amounts of coke years ago, and it had to be
obtainable in less-than-carload lots somewhere.

Dennis


Re: nice freight yard details

mrslandser
 

Could that be an "early" Hump Yard?  Looks like there might be a small elevation in the track, although I do not see any yardman handling the uncoupling.
 
Jack Hanger
Fremont, NE




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Peaked end gons, was gondola question

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden J SAD "
<elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Tim;



The C&O and Clinchfield are the only two I can think of that had
those ends. There were others with extended height ends, such as
NYC and P&LE but they were not peaked.

Nice photo!

Elden Gatwood

Not so fast, please, Elden. Even the little Rutland had peaked-end
gons, purchased secondhand from the N&W, but they were not G-5's or I
would own a few.

Regards, Don Valentine

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