Date   

Re: Interesting boat load

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 3, 2009, at 5:50 PM, mcindoefalls wrote:

Who would ever think to ship a large boat by rail . . . on its SIDE?

http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?
photoid=-66313070&id=54
http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?
photoid=25008555&id=54

Lots of other good STMFC photos on that site.

Walt Lankenau










Walt, serendipity strikes again. I'm finishing up a book for the
Santa Fe historical society on steam era flat and gondola cars - in
fact, the text and images have already gone to the editor - but it's
not too late to make additions, and I just have to have the images of
that Santa Fe Ft-T class flat car with the boat on it in the book.
I'm contacting the museum tomorrow for hi-res scans and permission to
publish. Thanks for calling our attention to them.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: CMWX Box tank cars

Ed Hawkins
 

On Mar 3, 2009, at 5:57 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

There's just something about the paint scheme on that box car
and the paint-outs that says "Airco/Air Reduction/ARDX" to me.
Unfortunately I have no ARDX photos that match it, but they
did have cars with full length side sills and R+3/4 ends like
this one.

http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/chatmart/cmwx_10019
-62_rb.jpg

Tim O'Connor
Tim and others,
I have a builder's photo of C.O.P.X. 1001, new 8-52, that looks
identical the car in the photo in the link. To the right of the door
was "CONDENSED WHEY TANK CAR" on two lines (painted over in the on-line
photo). Above the C.O.P.X. reporting marks are stencils reading
"CONSOLIDATED PRODUCTS CO." on two lines.

In the 4/55 ORER the Consolidated Products Co. had 19 milk cars of
various numbers with 3 or 4 digits. The only 4-digit numbers were 1001
and 1002, so there must have been two such cars built.

The car was somehow associated with the C&EI as there are stencils "DV
8-13-52" and "C&EI" on the brake reservoir. DV is Danville, a major
shop of the C&EI. The original car was painted a light color, possibly
gray with black side sills, trucks, ladders, placards, hand brake
(Miner), and grabs. The seam caps were coated black
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Interesting boat load

Rich Yoder
 

Interesting flat load on a AT&SF Flat car!
Look again at the car markings!
Sincerely, Rich Yoder

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
mcindoefalls
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2009 8:54 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Interesting boat load

Here's a third image of the boat load (the original two are below it):

http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=1860412688&id
=54

http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=-66313070&id=
54
http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=25008555&id=5
4


Walt Lankenau



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Interesting boat load

Bruce Smith
 

On Tue, March 3, 2009 7:53 pm, mcindoefalls wrote:
Here's a third image of the boat load (the original two are below it):

http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=1860412688&id=54

http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=-66313070&id=54
http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=25008555&id=54

Interesting... the caption reads "A Canadian National Railways flat car
transporting a boat from Qu�bec to North Bay".

Funny, but last I checked, Canadian National was not spelled A.T.S.F. ;^)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Interesting boat load

mcindoefalls
 


Interesting boat load

mcindoefalls
 

Who would ever think to ship a large boat by rail . . . on its SIDE?

http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=-66313070&id=54
http://imagescn.technomuses.ca/railways/index_view.cfm?photoid=25008555&id=54

Lots of other good STMFC photos on that site.

Walt Lankenau


Re: CMWX Box tank cars

Tim O'Connor
 

There's just something about the paint scheme on that box car
and the paint-outs that says "Airco/Air Reduction/ARDX" to me.
Unfortunately I have no ARDX photos that match it, but they
did have cars with full length side sills and R+3/4 ends like
this one.

http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/chatmart/cmwx_10019-62_rb.jpg

Tim O'Connor

At 3/3/2009 05:56 PM Tuesday, you wrote:
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jim_lancaster.geo" <ljames1@...> wrote:
Most photos of the CMWX 1000-series cars show Pfaudler cars. But
Rich's 1962 photo of CMWX 1001 shows a 40-foot box car with stenciling
that reads
FRAGILE CONTAINS
GLASS LINED TANKS
DO NOT HUMP

Other than the reporting marks, the car does not yet have any
Chateau Martin lettering.

The photo will be added to my Chateau Martin web page shortly.

Jim Lancaster
It's now there, along with another new photo from Brian Ehni.
See http://tinyurl.com/yomnqe

J. Lancaster


Re: CMWX Box tank cars

Jim Lancaster
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jim_lancaster.geo" <ljames1@...> wrote:
Most photos of the CMWX 1000-series cars show Pfaudler cars. But
Rich's 1962 photo of CMWX 1001 shows a 40-foot box car with stenciling
that reads
FRAGILE CONTAINS
GLASS LINED TANKS
DO NOT HUMP

Other than the reporting marks, the car does not yet have any
Chateau Martin lettering.

The photo will be added to my Chateau Martin web page shortly.

Jim Lancaster
It's now there, along with another new photo from Brian Ehni.
See http://tinyurl.com/yomnqe

J. Lancaster


Re: taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"

Steve SANDIFER
 

If you have been around a commercial machine shop, you know that they usually do machine work with cutting/cooling oils involved. The oils cool the pieces, wash out the cuttings, preserve the cutting surfaces, give smoother cuts and lubricate the tools. When working on a brass casting (like an old PFM cast caboose) or an old cast metal diesel, use a quality cutting oil on your drill and feed it very very slowly, cleaning out the hole from time to time. Otherwise you are guaranteed to snap a drill.

----------------------------------------------------------------
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Dr., Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417
Personal: http://www.geocities.com/stevesandifer2000/index
Church: http://www.swcentral.org

----- Original Message -----
From: Rod Miller
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2009 3:40 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"


This works on brass models. I don't know what will happen
with your diecast boiler. You might want to experiment first.
Perhaps others have more information on diecast.

I remove all ferrous parts and then immerse the brass
part with the embedded broken screw/drill in a solution of
salt water, highly concentrated. Takes a few days, and will
damage paint.

There is a faster method using IIRC alum. Hopefully someone
will chime in with info on it.

Rod

Quesnelle, Claude wrote:
> All,
>
> I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel
> Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling
> "freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a
> locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin
> vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have
> it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit
> broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I
> develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to
> the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to
> extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking
> out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any
> catch, some yes, but not much.
>
> Thanks
>
> Claude


Re: CMWX Box tank cars

Jim Lancaster
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, cinderandeight@... wrote:

These cars are not the Pfaudler cars, they are very similar to the Linde tank
cars of Air Products Co.(SERX), but they have a Youngstown door rather than
panel door, and the side sills run the full length of the car rather than
bolster to bolster. They lack a step below the door, which Linde cars had. The
ends are improved Dreadnaught, R-3-4 pattern. I can't see the A end to tell if
it had a small access door like the Linde cars. There is a small note next to
the door that is unreadable in the photo, but I may be able to read off the
negative at high magnification. I'll report back if I can read it. I thnk the
CMWX stands for
Chateau Martin Wine, and the photo location was San Martin, CA. (San Martin
Winery location)
Rich Burg
**************Need a job? Find employment help in your area.
(http://yellowpages.aol.com/search?query=employment_agencies&ncid=emlcntusyelp00000005)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
Most photos of the CMWX 1000-series cars show Pfaudler cars. But Rich's 1962 photo of CMWX 1001 shows a 40-foot box car with stenciling that reads
FRAGILE CONTAINS
GLASS LINED TANKS
DO NOT HUMP

Other than the reporting marks, the car does not yet have any Chateau Martin lettering.

The photo will be added to my Chateau Martin web page shortly.

Jim Lancaster


Re: taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"

Victor Bitleris
 

Hi Claude,
So far, I have been very fortunate and have been able to retrieve these little broken pieces whenever I have done this in a cast locomotive. A plastic one should be easy, you may be able to pull it through on the inside? A cast one is more difficult, because likely it did not go through. There are two things you may wish to try. 1. using magnifiers, see if you can back it out slowly with a scriber. Once (If) you get it to the point where you have any purchase on it at all, get some very small tight closing pliers and using magnifiers, try to grab the drill and back it out with a twisting motion. You may need to do this several times. If it actually starts to move, it is just a matter of perseverance and it will come out. 2. If, on the other hand, if it just gets rounded off and loses any ability to grab it, then the only thing I know of is to make a small hole adjacent to the piece and get it out using a scriber or something like that. Of course, you will need to fill in the hole and start again. I find it is not too bad to fill in a hole in a cast locomotive. I drill the offending area out and tap it with either, an 00-90, 0-80, 0r 1-72, whichever is the smallest tap that will work. I try the brass screw in the newly tapped hole to make sure it is good, then I put some Tix flux on the screw, heat it up, put some solder to it and as soon as the solder starts to liquify, you want to screw it in right away. You get one shot at this, so it is best to leave the soldering iron on the side of the scerew and screw it in while heating up. Trust me, when done this way it isn't coming out, even if you heat it again. File it down, mark and proceed to make a new hole.

Vic Bitleris
Raleigh, NC



To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
From: brossard77@yahoo.ca
Date: Tue, 3 Mar 2009 15:08:30 -0500
Subject: [STMFC] taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"





















All,



I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling "freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any catch, some yes, but not much.



Thanks



Claude






















_________________________________________________________________
Hotmail® is up to 70% faster. Now good news travels really fast.
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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"

Rod Miller
 

This works on brass models. I don't know what will happen
with your diecast boiler. You might want to experiment first.
Perhaps others have more information on diecast.

I remove all ferrous parts and then immerse the brass
part with the embedded broken screw/drill in a solution of
salt water, highly concentrated. Takes a few days, and will
damage paint.

There is a faster method using IIRC alum. Hopefully someone
will chime in with info on it.

Rod

Quesnelle, Claude wrote:

All,
I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel
Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling
"freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a
locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin
vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have
it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit
broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I
develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to
the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to
extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking
out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any
catch, some yes, but not much.
Thanks
Claude


Re: Drill Bits and MiniMate

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Claude,
I find that the lack of a tail, be it a power cord or a power shaft,
really improves the control I have.
I can't recall the last time I snapped a bit while drilling a model
part with the Mini Mite.
The drill press I use for milling resin and drilling bolster screw
pilot holes, as well as drilling metal. Bolster holes I believe need
to perfect, everything else can be close to square.
Pierre Oliver
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Quesnelle, Claude" <brossard77@...>
wrote:

Thanks Pierre.

Is there that much more control of the MiniMite over a "regular"
Dremel fitted with the flex shaft? The flex shaft in my hands feels
like a pencil, and I get some good control, but I have to admit I
don't have that much experience using it to drill small holes. I
just got a micro chuck from MicroMark, so need to play with that
when I have the time.

I guess put another way, you get good control, drill holes with
minimal bit breakage using the MiniMite held in your hand? You
don't use a drill press, or found you don't need to use a press?

Thanks

Claude


Claude,
One of the big appeals to me for the Mini-Mite is the mobility and
flexibility I can have with smaller tool. I can drill odd angles
as
quickly as square holes. I also like the fact that it dosn't
occupy
much bench space. That 2 square feet can shrink pretty quickly.
Pierre Oliver


Re: Looking for Quanah, Acme and Pacific Boxcar Photo

Jim and Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

Go to http://www.sunshinekits.com/sunimages/sun59b.pdf for a picture and info about the Sunshine QA&P boxcar.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon


taking out broken drill bits, was "Drill Bits and MiniMate"

Claude Quesnelle
 

All,

I'm sure you've read my last posts asking about the Dremel Work Station and MiniMite held in the hand (drilling "freehand"). The reason for this interest: I have a locomotive shell that I was working on, using a #80 in a pin vice to drill out holes for hand grabs and, as luck would have it, or maybe cause I didn't have a steady hand :-(, said bit broke into the piece, with very little sticking out. Either I develop a steadier hand or get a drill press. But, back to the loco shell. Does anyone have any tips or tricks on how to extract that broken bit? When I say there isn't much sticking out, I can run my finger over it and there is hardly any catch, some yes, but not much.

Thanks

Claude


Re: Looking for Quanah, Acme and Pacific Boxcar Photo

Paul Lyons
 

Pat,

Martin Lofton, Sunshine Models, has already produced these decals and they are included in his resin kits for the double sheathed cars. The?Prototype Data Sheet that comes with that kit? has a couple of good photos of the cars.
I am traveling, or I would send you a scan.


Paul Lyons
Laguna Niguel, Ca

-----Original Message-----
From: Pat Duffin <patduffin@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tue, 3 Mar 2009 10:13 am
Subject: [STMFC] Looking for Quanah, Acme and Pacific Boxcar Photo






I am producing a set of lettering for the QAP double sheathed boxcar, The
only photo I have is the one that is included in the San Juan Car Company
for the "O" scale version of this car, #502, and the photo is of
insufficient detail to make out the smaller data on the car. I would
appreciate a tip on availability for that photo in a larger size. Thanks Pat
Duffin


Re: Drill Bits and MiniMate

Claude Quesnelle
 

Thanks Pierre.

Is there that much more control of the MiniMite over a "regular" Dremel fitted with the flex shaft? The flex shaft in my hands feels like a pencil, and I get some good control, but I have to admit I don't have that much experience using it to drill small holes. I just got a micro chuck from MicroMark, so need to play with that when I have the time.

I guess put another way, you get good control, drill holes with minimal bit breakage using the MiniMite held in your hand? You don't use a drill press, or found you don't need to use a press?

Thanks

Claude


Claude,
One of the big appeals to me for the Mini-Mite is the mobility and
flexibility I can have with smaller tool. I can drill odd angles as
quickly as square holes. I also like the fact that it dosn't occupy
much bench space. That 2 square feet can shrink pretty quickly.
Pierre Oliver


Looking for Quanah, Acme and Pacific Boxcar Photo

Pat M Duffin
 

I am producing a set of lettering for the QAP double sheathed boxcar, The
only photo I have is the one that is included in the San Juan Car Company
for the "O" scale version of this car, #502, and the photo is of
insufficient detail to make out the smaller data on the car. I would
appreciate a tip on availability for that photo in a larger size. Thanks Pat
Duffin


Re: Track for Steam era freight cars

Charlie Vlk
 

Brian-

They probably had the Fast Tracks jigs...

http://www.handlaidtrack.com/

MiNiModuTrak has some of them in N Scale as well as some similar custom fixtures made locally for our own configuration turnouts and crossings.

Charlie Vlk

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian J. Carlson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2009 11:57 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Track for Steam era freight cars


I need some help. While at naperville I talked with the Midwest Mod-u-
trak group about the tools they were using for handlaying track. They
had two tools from a company for making the point rails, and one for
notching out the stock rail to fit the point. For the life of me I can
not recall the company that made the products. Did anyone have a
similar conversation with them, or know the tools I am thinking about.

Brian Carlson






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Re: Track for Steam era freight cars

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Brian,
The company that you're looking for is "Fast Tracks"
http://www.handlaidtrack.com/
The point/frog filing jig and the "StockAid" are but 2 of an amazing
line of tools and jigs created for making the job of handlaying track
almost foolproof.
I urge you to have a look at his "Twist Tie" system for turnouts. I'm
using it exclusively for my new layout.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J. Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

I need some help. While at naperville I talked with the Midwest Mod-
u-
trak group about the tools they were using for handlaying track.
They
had two tools from a company for making the point rails, and one for
notching out the stock rail to fit the point. For the life of me I
can
not recall the company that made the products. Did anyone have a
similar conversation with them, or know the tools I am thinking
about.

Brian Carlson

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