Date   

Re: MILW double-sheathed box cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

According to the Milwaukee's 1937 freight car diagram book, 500000-502954, built 1913, and 92482-93480, built 1912. Let me know if you'd like me to email you a copy of the diagram.
Thanks, I'd appreciate that. I know the dimensions from the ORER but can use the additional info of a diagram.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Ramblings

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Like Ray, I also have a small tackle box with a subset of tools for travelling. I found it easier to just buy anoter X-Acto, bottle of glue, tweezers, and so on than to keep swapping them back and forth.

For the model room I got an old serving cart from a second-hand store for the tools and paints. I made a dust cover from plastic sheet for when I'm not modeling, and can roll it under the table to save space. The big advantage is that it can be placed beside me, leaving the table free.

KL


Re: Ramblings

Ray Breyer
 

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking
about several things that impede my progress: tools all silver
and mostly round. I thought how nice it would be if tools were
color coded rather than spending precious time locating the right
xacto or screw driver. Then I thought of the many times round
tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time
looking for them on the floor. Has anyone solved the problem of
rolling tools or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a
specific tool?
Armand Premo

Hi Armand,

My OCD doesn't actually like color-coded tools, since they then get mixed up too randomly and the paint gets worn and yucky-looking (VBG!)

I've found over the years that I rely on about four hand tool for 70% of my modeling, and about another dozen for another 25%, rarely dragging out the exotics and only using the powered tools (Dremel, soldering equipment, etc) when I have the opportunity and time to work on metal steam. Since my primary tool list is so small I keep a simple Plano tacklebox insert as my "tool box". Something like this:
http://www.planomolding.com/images/2363020a.jpg
It's simple, latchable, easily transported, and has enough slots in it to have one for files, pliers, "sharps", drills, etc. In fact, since I've moved four times in the past twelve years I've basically taught myself to "portable-ize" ALL of my hobby supplies, and I may have the world's largest collection of Plano boxes.

The nicest thing about keeping things organized like this is that it's really easy to pick up and bring a small prohect with me if I'm on the road, or if it's an especially nice day and I feel like working on the deck.

Regards,

Ray Breyer


Re: Wabash Boxcar in Atlanta, IL

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "gn3397" <heninger@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Donald B. Valentine" <riverman_vt@> wrote:

What a super boxcar restoration and display but a double door auto car for shipping grain???? Was this a "common practice"??

Don Valentine
Mr. Valentine,
In a word, no. Grain doors were sized to fit the standard 6' boxcar door opening in the steam era. Occasionally, 7 and 8 foot door boxcars may have been pressed into service, but this required the use of more than one grain door per side, both to cover the door opening and reinforce the "splice" in the doors to prevent failure of the grain door and subsequent loss of lading. This was done only as a last resort, because grain doors, like boxcars, were always in short supply during the harvest rush.

Late in the steam era, the GN (and several other roads) built and bought several series of 40' and 50' plug/sliding door boxcars that had 6' sliding doors so that they could be coopered if needed for grain service.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, IA
Thanks very much, Bob. That's about what I expected. I'm reasonably familiar with both Signode grain doors and, to a lesser extent, the wooden ones. But it is still good to see the Rock Island automobile car so well taken care of though it is unfortunate that the museum could find a more appropriate car, even if it were an older steel one.

Thanks again,
Don Valentine


Re: Ramblings

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Don't know about Micro-Mark without checking our their catalog but I have used these same triangular rubber pieces on pencils, Xacto knives, dental picks, scribers and and other tools for some years.
I believe they have been available in blue, red, yellow and, possibly, green. Mine were all purchased at Staples and were very inexpensive. They should solve both the color coding and tool
rolling issues that Armand has written about.

Don Valentine

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

Micro-Mark (I think, but there are certainly others) sells a rubberish,
triangular section tube that fits over the No. 1 handle and keeps it from
rolling. I found a small rubberish protective cap for something the fit
loosely on the end of the handle. I jammed a small piece of sprue or rod or
something in there parallel to the handle axis that both locks it all solid
and keeps it from rolling.
----- Original Message -----
From: A. Premo

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking about several
things that impede my progress:tools all silver and mostly round.I thought
how nice it would be if tools were color coded rather than spending precious
time locating the right xacto or screw driver.Then I thought of the many
times round tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time
looking for them on the floor.Has anyone solved the problem of rolling tools
or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a specific tool? Am I alone
dealing with these frustrations? <G>Armand Premo


Re: DL&W 18000 series hoppers

Ed Hawkins
 

On Apr 5, 2009, at 10:32 AM, bud9351 wrote:

Hello,
I am looking for info, or plans for the Lackawanna RR 18000-18999
series covered hoppers blt in Oct '56. I have conflicting information
on the length, one source says 41' another 47'. Any help?
Thanks,
Bud Rindfleisch
Bud,
I'm presuming you are looking for the cars in series 18000-18099, 100
cars built by AC&F lot no. 4698. The reason you are finding two length
dimensions is because the inside length is specified as 41' and outside
length as 47'-1".

The original set of drawings (about a dozen or so) are at the Museum of
Transportation in St. Louis, Mo. These include a general arrangement,
brake arrangement, and more detailed drawings of various steel parts or
assemblies. Contact me off list if you are interested in obtaining
copies.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Ramblings

krlpeters
 

While not sure about heat-shrink tubing, electrical tape is sold in colors, can be found in any good hardware store. 
 
As for the triangler shaped sleeves, at one time office supply stores sold a similar product for pencils.
 
Karl Peters


Testing

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Sorry, just passing through, to see if I get it back . . .

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!







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Re: Ramblings

armprem
 

Gee it's great to belong to such an august group.I am glad I am not out there all alone.Thanks for all your help gang.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@yahoo.ca>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, April 05, 2009 12:09 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Ramblings


I built a workbench specifically for model building. It has a plywood top and three side boards of 1" x 3" to catch those parts that seem to roll off the bench and disappear into never-never land. Another piece of 1" x 3" is at the back of the workbench. It is drilled with 1/4" and 1/2" holes to hold all of those round tools upright.



Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "A. Premo" <armprem@...> wrote:

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking about several
things that impede my progress:tools all silver and mostly round.I thought
how nice it would be if tools were color coded rather than spending precious
time locating the right xacto or screw driver.Then I thought of the many
times round tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time
looking for them on the floor.Has anyone solved the problem of rolling tools
or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a specific tool? Am I alone
dealing with these frustrations? <G>Armand Premo



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





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Re: Ramblings

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I built a workbench specifically for model building. It has a plywood top and three side boards of 1" x 3" to catch those parts that seem to roll off the bench and disappear into never-never land. Another piece of 1" x 3" is at the back of the workbench. It is drilled with 1/4" and 1/2" holes to hold all of those round tools upright.



Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "A. Premo" <armprem@...> wrote:

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking about several
things that impede my progress:tools all silver and mostly round.I thought
how nice it would be if tools were color coded rather than spending precious
time locating the right xacto or screw driver.Then I thought of the many
times round tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time
looking for them on the floor.Has anyone solved the problem of rolling tools
or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a specific tool? Am I alone
dealing with these frustrations? <G>Armand Premo


Re: MILW double-sheathed box cars

al_brown03
 

The 1/43 ORER gives the series as MILW 500000-502954, 795 cars. The 1/53 ORER shows a single car left: MILW 502055. There's a photo of MILW 500219 in Krause and Crist's NYO&W book, p 95, in a Middletown & Unionville train.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Awhile back I dug through a lot of material to identify a group
of MILW DS box cars, but now cannot find the full sheet of notes. All
I can find is a note (intended as a pointer to the full note sheet)
saying that these were MILW 500000 to about 502000. Can anyone confirm
if these are the right cars? And if not, what were they?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


DL&W 18000 series hoppers

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Hello,
I am looking for info, or plans for the Lackawanna RR 18000-18999 series covered hoppers blt in Oct '56. I have conflicting information on the length, one source says 41' another 47'. Any help?
Thanks,
Bud Rindfleisch


Re: MILW double-sheathed box cars

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

These boxcars were ubiquitous, but seldom photographed. These were the boxcars that were largely replaced by the large orders of SS cars in the late twenties, and they were to be completely retired by the production of the welded ribside cars in the late thirties. For all intents and purposes those cars whose lives were then extended by WWII service all but completely disappeared when the war ended. A very few lasted as late as 1953.

The diagram books do depict the breadth and variety of these cars. Richard Hendrickson has the best collection of photos that I know of. Most visual information otherwise has to be gained by close inspection of photographs where these cars are only an incidental subject. Some of the close details can be determined by inspection of the many photos that the Milwaukee shops took of their new-building lightweight "Hiawatha" passenger cars. On the next assembly line in full view were an entire line of the double sheathed cars being converted into flangers and MOW-type cars.

Denny


Re: Ramblings

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Robert Federle gave the first answer, here's the second: You have paint, I'm sure. A dab on the
tools you want to keep straight will assist. Since I am forever picking up the Phillips
screwdriver, instead of the straight bladed one, I have put a small red band around the Phillips.
On a few models which have both kinds of screw, when they are in obscure locations (like inside a
model), I may dab the screwhead with the corresponding color.

Since I use razor blades and not X-actos, that's not much of a problem. I try to remember to open a
new one each modeling session, since they are so cheap. Sharp tools are best.

SGL

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking about several
things that impede my progress:tools all silver and mostly round.I thought
how nice it would be if tools were color coded rather than spending precious
time locating the right xacto or screw driver.Then I thought of the many
times round tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time
looking for them on the floor.Has anyone solved the problem of rolling tools
or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a specific tool? Am I alone
dealing with these frustrations? <G>Armand Premo




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Re: Ramblings

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

how nice it would be if tools were color coded<
Some are. I recently bought some smaller Phillips screwdrivers and they had different color bands on them. I think some manufactures are just now thinking of this.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Ramblings

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Micro-Mark (I think, but there are certainly others) sells a rubberish, triangular section tube that fits over the No. 1 handle and keeps it from rolling. I found a small rubberish protective cap for something the fit loosely on the end of the handle. I jammed a small piece of sprue or rod or something in there parallel to the handle axis that both locks it all solid and keeps it from rolling.

Don't they make heat-shrink tubing in colors? If so, that would seem to solve both your problems: Cut a length of HST in the color of your choice and trap a piece of plastic rod next to the handle when you shrink it.

I don't have the silver multitude problem that Armand does. I did run into mix-ups between glues, enamel and acrylic paints, and metallic paints, cleaners, and brushes. (Always best to keep the four categories segregated.) I ended up painting the bottle lids and ends of the brush handles in code:

Blue = glue
White = water (acrylics)
Orange = oil (enamels)
Silver = metallics

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: A. Premo

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking about several
things that impede my progress:tools all silver and mostly round.I thought
how nice it would be if tools were color coded rather than spending precious
time locating the right xacto or screw driver.Then I thought of the many
times round tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time
looking for them on the floor.Has anyone solved the problem of rolling tools
or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a specific tool? Am I alone
dealing with these frustrations? <G>Armand Premo


Re: Ramblings

rfederle@...
 

Not sure about color coded tools (but I am sure they are out there somewhere) but the round tools.....there are sleeves that fit most x-acto tools to keep them from rolling. I believe they are hex shaped and slip on the handles. Should be available from Micro-mark and similar suppliers.

Robert Federle
---- "A. Premo" <armprem@surfglobal.net> wrote:

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking about several
things that impede my progress:tools all silver and mostly round.I thought
how nice it would be if tools were color coded rather than spending precious
time locating the right xacto or screw driver.Then I thought of the many
times round tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time
looking for them on the floor.Has anyone solved the problem of rolling tools
or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a specific tool? Am I alone
dealing with these frustrations? <G>Armand Premo


Re: MILW double-sheathed box cars

Ray Breyer
 

Hi Tony,
 
According to the Milwaukee's 1937 freight car diagram book, 500000-502954, built 1913, and 92482-93480, built 1912. Let me know if you'd like me to email you a copy of the diagram.
 
Regards,
 
Ray Breyer

--- On Sun, 4/5/09, Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com> wrote:

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@signaturepress.com>
Subject: [STMFC] MILW double-sheathed box cars
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, April 5, 2009, 12:22 AM

Awhile back I dug through a lot of material to identify a group
of MILW DS box cars, but now cannot find the full sheet of notes. All
I can find is a note (intended as a pointer to the full note sheet)
saying that these were MILW 500000 to about 502000. Can anyone confirm
if these are the right cars? And if not, what were they?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Ramblings

armprem
 

Sitting at my work bench working on freight cars I am thinking about several things that impede my progress:tools all silver and mostly round.I thought how nice it would be if tools were color coded rather than spending precious time locating the right xacto or screw driver.Then I thought of the many times round tools rolled off the work bench causing me to spend more time looking for them on the floor.Has anyone solved the problem of rolling tools or time spent searching in a sea of silver for a specific tool? Am I alone dealing with these frustrations? <G>Armand Premo


MILW double-sheathed box cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Awhile back I dug through a lot of material to identify a group of MILW DS box cars, but now cannot find the full sheet of notes. All I can find is a note (intended as a pointer to the full note sheet) saying that these were MILW 500000 to about 502000. Can anyone confirm if these are the right cars? And if not, what were they?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history

107981 - 108000 of 188621