Date   

Re: Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

bnpmodeler
 

Tim -

Thanks so much for the info. I don't have the '61 CBC, unfortunately.

I think that the 'D-F' is white; and the load restraining symbol is different (can someone define these? I can try to post a scan of each type; it would seem that the early, non-D-F series had one style, and the D-F series had another). I have searched all of the EL, DL&W and Erie decal sets I know of to find that 'D-F' symbol but have struck out... :(

Yes, I believe the 12000 - 12073 were classed XM, and the D-F version (12074 - 12099) were classed XME.

The plot thickens!

Jim Harr

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Jim

There is a photo of DL&W 12098 in the 1961 Car Builder's (p.76)

Unfortunately I can't make out the rb, step, or even the brake
wheel, although the shape of the handbrake housing is consistent
with an Ajax brake wheel.

Was the DF logo white, or yellow? That style of DF logo looks
familiar (EL perhaps?) but I can't recall any decal set that
includes it. There is no lading strap anchor symbol on 12098
but there is another symbol -- a thick white bar with center
circle (load divider perhaps?). It's just below the DF. Also
the car is marked XME.

Here's something -- the retainer valve is painted silver or
light gray!

From what can be seen of the roof, the seam caps are body
color. Could be overspray. It was not unusual for brand new
roofs to have shiny panels with dark, enameled seam caps.

If you find out any more facts let us know. I have the same
kit and I need the same information!

Tim



I am working on detailing and weathering some of the really nice Branchline kits that represent the DL&W, 12000 - 12099 series, 50' welded AAR boxcars with the billboard 'Lackawanna' scheme. As part of this detailing program I would like to utilize photo-etched running boards and brake steps.

My DL&W diagram book is only good until 5/1/52, and these cars were built in September, 1956, so I don't have a DL&W diagram sheet for them. Can any of you confirm the type of running board, brake step and brake wheel these cars had? The E-L diagram sheet (#7-7) indicates an Ajax brake wheel, but no running board option; I assume the Ajax brake wheel was original equipment.

I would also really like to re-number one into the 'D-F' scheme (numbers 12074 - 12099); any idea where the appropriate 'D-F' lettering may be found? Also cool to have would be the little loading strap anchor symbols - the circle with a vertical line: (I) .

The models come with a silver 'galvanized' roof; would it be appropriate to paint the ribs with black or freight car color to show a flaked paint effect?

I realize these are probably pushing the limits of the STMFC era, but would appreciate any guidance you can provide. Many thanks in advance;

Jim Harr


Re: Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Does that kit have welded sides??

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of bnpmodeler
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 12:27 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

Mike -

Thanks so much! This proves my first great hope, that these did indeed have Morton RB's; Having
the round hole
'texture' will make these even more visually arresting! Also, thanks for the confirmation of truck
style...

Jim Harr

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , MDelvec952 <MDelvec952@...> wrote:





In a message dated 04/05/09 19:21:23 Eastern Daylight Time, bnchmark@... writes:
My DL&W diagram book is only good until 5/1/52, and these cars were built in September, 1956, so
I don't have a
DL&W diagram sheet for them. Can any of you confirm the type of running board, brake step and
brake wheel these
cars had? The E-L diagram sheet (#7-7) indicates an Ajax brake wheel, but no running board option;
I assume the Ajax
brake wheel was original equipment.
-------------------

The DL&W general arrangement drawings for this batch call for Morton running boards and brake
steps, Ajax hand
brake, A-3 Ride Control trucks and welded sides.

I missed that Branchline was offering these, so I'm looking forward to seeing one, though
they're too new for my
goals, post steam-era.

Hope this helps ....Mike Del Vecchio










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Re: Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

bnpmodeler
 

Mike -

Thanks so much! This proves my first great hope, that these did indeed have Morton RB's; Having the round hole 'texture' will make these even more visually arresting! Also, thanks for the confirmation of truck style...

Jim Harr

--- In STMFC@..., MDelvec952 <MDelvec952@...> wrote:





In a message dated 04/05/09 19:21:23 Eastern Daylight Time, bnchmark@... writes:
My DL&W diagram book is only good until 5/1/52, and these cars were built in September, 1956, so I don't have a DL&W diagram sheet for them. Can any of you confirm the type of running board, brake step and brake wheel these cars had? The E-L diagram sheet (#7-7) indicates an Ajax brake wheel, but no running board option; I assume the Ajax brake wheel was original equipment.
-------------------

The DL&W general arrangement drawings for this batch call for Morton running boards and brake steps, Ajax hand brake, A-3 Ride Control trucks and welded sides.

I missed that Branchline was offering these, so I'm looking forward to seeing one, though they're too new for my goals, post steam-era.

Hope this helps ....Mike Del Vecchio


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: boxcars in grain service

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:

I think that you are overlooking the 40' dbl door (12') 3500 series of 1955 built steel boxcars. They had the removable center door post, which was done well on the McKeen car, which was almost correct for the GN 3500 class, except for the lower side sill and the lack of an overhanging eaves roof.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
You are correct, Andy. I didn't know about them, but I don't have much interest in prototypes built past September 1949. Did any other GN double door cars have the center post? What is the purpose of the center post anyway?

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, IA


Re: boxcars in grain service

Andy Carlson
 

I think that you are overlooking the 40' dbl door (12') 3500 series of 1955 built steel boxcars. They had the removable center door post, which was done well on the McKeen car, which was almost correct for the GN 3500 class, except for the lower side sill and the lack of an overhanging eaves roof.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

--- On Sun, 4/5/09, gn3397 <heninger@...> wrote:

As far as double door cars with center posts, they weren't used at all on the Great Northern.


Re: Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

Schuyler Larrabee
 

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw12098alb.jpg
That photo suggests to me the DF is white.

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw12040alb.jpg
This one suggests to me the seam caps are rusting.

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw12051lba.jpg

In the builder's photo (the first one, of course) the roof looks like it's painted, but in these
later shots, most if not all the paint's come off the roof panels. Personally, I think the roof
panels were never painted but the seam caps may have been, as they (barely) show in the builder's
photo as dark.

And Jim, you simply must have looked at Larry DeYoung and Mike Del Vecchio's book "Color Guide to
ERIE and DL&W Equipment" right? The first shot of these cars in that book, shows JUST enough of the
running board to make me think that it could be a Morton roof walk, with circular holes. But I too
would like more substantive proof before I did that.

SGL (wondering if I will get this back via the list or not . . .)

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor

Jim

There is a photo of DL&W 12098 in the 1961 Car Builder's (p.76)

Unfortunately I can't make out the rb, step, or even the brake
wheel, although the shape of the handbrake housing is consistent
with an Ajax brake wheel.

Was the DF logo white, or yellow? That style of DF logo looks
familiar (EL perhaps?) but I can't recall any decal set that
includes it. There is no lading strap anchor symbol on 12098
but there is another symbol -- a thick white bar with center
circle (load divider perhaps?). It's just below the DF. Also
the car is marked XME.

Here's something -- the retainer valve is painted silver or
light gray!

From what can be seen of the roof, the seam caps are body
color. Could be overspray. It was not unusual for brand new
roofs to have shiny panels with dark, enameled seam caps.

If you find out any more facts let us know. I have the same
kit and I need the same information!

Tim

I am working on detailing and weathering some of the really nice Branchline kits that represent
the DL&W, 12000 -
12099 series, 50' welded AAR boxcars with the billboard 'Lackawanna' scheme. As part of this
detailing program I
would like to utilize photo-etched running boards and brake steps.

My DL&W diagram book is only good until 5/1/52, and these cars were built in September, 1956, so
I don't have a
DL&W diagram sheet for them. Can any of you confirm the type of running board, brake step and
brake wheel these
cars had? The E-L diagram sheet (#7-7) indicates an Ajax brake wheel, but no running board option;
I assume the Ajax
brake wheel was original equipment.

I would also really like to re-number one into the 'D-F' scheme (numbers 12074 - 12099); any idea
where the
appropriate 'D-F' lettering may be found? Also cool to have would be the little loading strap
anchor symbols - the circle
with a vertical line: (I) .

The models come with a silver 'galvanized' roof; would it be appropriate to paint the ribs with
black or freight car color
to show a flaked paint effect?

I realize these are probably pushing the limits of the STMFC era, but would appreciate any
guidance you can provide.
Many thanks in advance;

Jim Harr







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boxcars in grain service

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

OK, not so fast. I just quickly went through my photo stash, and almost immediately found two photos of double door cars spotted at grain elevators. One's from the Tacoma Public Library collection, and shows an old C&O single sheathed, double door car, with both all-wood doors open, spotted under an elevator's loading lean-to. The second is from the Life collection, and shows a Pennsy steel double door car spotted at a large elevator/mill complex.
Ray,
I won't argue with photographic evidence to the contrary, but the question as I understood it was "was it common for double door automobile boxcars to be used for shipping grain" which I took to mean bulk grain service. I would still submit to you that this was not common by any means, but impossible? No. I too have perused many photos of branchline elevators in North Dakota and Montana, and I have yet to see one that shows a double door auto boxcar spotted at an elevator being loaded with bulk grain.


I can think of at least four reasons why a "double door" box could be spotted at an elevator:

1) The car was misdelivered. Yard crews, trainmen, and agents aren't gods, and they certainly didn't get things right all the time, especially in the pre-computer era. Show me someone who says railroads didn't regularly screw up car deliveries, and I'll show you someone who doesn't know what they're talking about.
True, but the research I have done on the GN branchlines I am most familiar with indicates that the branchline runs were held by the most senior trainmen, due to the fact that the locals had a predictable schedule. Stories abound that train crews were regularly plied with bottles of whiskey or other gratuities by elevator managers in the hope of assuring a more favorable car distribution. The train crews knew the elevators didn't need or want automobile boxcars for grain loading.


2) The car was carrying something, or was being loaded with something, other than bulk grain. Is the "elevator" really a mill? If so, a double door car could be loaded with bagged grain and feed. Is the small town elevator also a hardware store, tractor sales point, lumberyard and local team track? If so, that double door car could be delivering just about anything to "the elevator" from lube oil to hatched chicks.
Yes, very true, but bagged feed and seed, lube oil, and hatched chicks aren't bulk grain.


3) Is that "double door" boxcar REALLY a "double door" boxcar? Or has one door been sealed 14 years ago, making it into a plain box which is now suitable for grain loading? This is pretty common, so you may not really be seeing what you think you're seeing. The Wabash sealed a lot of those double door cars like the one in Atlanta, so that car's completely appropriate for the display. Chet French has provided me with Wabash car delivery lists to the Central Soya mill in Gibson City, IL, and there are a couple of these sealed door cars in the mix.
Good point, but many of these functionally single door cars were created by welding or otherwise permanently fixing the doors in place. A standard 40' steam era boxcar usually has wooden door posts to allow a grain door to be nailed in place, thereby allowing a grain tight seal. A double door car that has been converted to a single door car often
didn't have the internal sheathing extended, and therefore still had a large door opening that would be difficult to cooper to prevent grain leakage. If you are shipping bagged flour, feed, seed, or fertilizer, these cars would likely be acceptable, no doubt why they show up in car delivery lists to a mill.


4) A conversation as overheard in Green Bay, Wisconsin, circa 1944: "Welcome to the grain rush. We're short of cars, so that elevator in Sturgis is getting anything we can find. What's that? We've a single sheathed with double doors on hand? Good; someone send that new kid from the car department over there with a 4x4, a bunch of 2x4s and some nails; we'll fix the doors so the car can hold grain."
(OK, this is a made up conversation, but you get the point. And some early double sheathed double door wagon cars had removable vertical posts between the doors; I wouldn't be surprised to see a few of these sorts of cars on the roster of granger roads)
I would rebut that elevators weren't bound to accept whatever cars the railroads to deliver to them. I interviewed one trainmaster who was working in Williston, ND in the fall of 1949, and during a period of extreme car shortage he sent a train of 100 boxcars (mostly eastern roads) with rough interiors up a branch in Montana with coopering materials provided at railroad expense. The elevators refused 97 of the cars and they were hauled back by the next day's local. So it sometimes didn't matter if the car could hold grain if it wasn't what the elevator wanted. They would just wait (and complain loudly to state regulatory agencies in the meantime) until they could get the cars they wanted.
As far as double door cars with center posts, they weren't used at all on the Great Northern. Perhaps on other roads. In fact GN rebuilt many of its 50' single sheathed and 40' double sheathed door and half boxcars into cars with single 6' doors. If double door cars were acceptable for bulk grain shipments, why rebuild the cars?

It's this sort of difference in thinking that can make a double door boxcar a natural (though probably not common) thing to see at a local elevator.

My original point exactly. I think that a double door auto boxcar being spotted at an originating country elevator to be loaded with bulk grain would be very unusual, and for the elevator to actually load the car with grain would be even more unusual. I just don't think it happened very often.

As far as loading grain doors in double door boxcars to return them to elevators, I also think this would be unusual. Most terminal elevators or mills would generally have tracks full of empty 40' boxcars with 6' doors that would be returning to the small rural elevators, so the grain doors would just be loaded into those cars. Why haul an extra car back if you don't need to?

I still stand by my original assertion: in the steam era, it would be very unusual to see a double door automobile boxcar used in bulk grain service.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, IA


FW: DL&W 18000 series hoppers

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Bud, attached is the EL diagram sheet for these cars. If anyone else on STMFC would like a copy,
please send me an email OFF LIST and I'll forward it to you directly. Assuming I actually GET your
email. Verizon and my computer don't seem to be getting along for some reason Verizon didn't
understand earlier today.

SGL

--- In STMFC@..., "bud9351" <BlackDiamondRR@...> wrote:

Hello,
I am looking for info, or plans for the Lackawanna RR 18000-18999 series covered hoppers blt in
Oct '56. I have
conflicting information on the length, one source says 41' another 47'. Any help?
Thanks,
Bud Rindfleisch



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FW: DL&W 18000 series hoppers

Schuyler Larrabee
 

You can see below that I mentioned email problems in my attempt to reply to this question earlier
today . . .

Here is another attempt to get this to the list, and to Ed. I'll be interested to see if this gets
through the process.

SGL


Hi Bud,

Timely question here, as I'm having some trouble with my email account, not getting all the
messages, and this one, which I picked off the STMFC home page, is a case in point,

So, yeah, yeah, get to the point!

Those cars measure 47'- 03/4" over buffers according to the diagram which I will forward to you
off-list later today..

Note that these cars will be available as a resin kit in the not too terribly distant future, in
part due to assistance from a couple of members of this list. I am not in control of that
schedule,
but I've been pushing for it for a couple of years.

SGL


Hello,
I am looking for info, or plans for the Lackawanna RR 18000-18999 series covered hoppers blt
in
Oct '56. I have
conflicting information on the length, one source says 41' another 47'. Any help?
Thanks,
Bud Rindfleisch




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Re: Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

Tim O'Connor
 

Jim

There is a photo of DL&W 12098 in the 1961 Car Builder's (p.76)

Unfortunately I can't make out the rb, step, or even the brake
wheel, although the shape of the handbrake housing is consistent
with an Ajax brake wheel.

Was the DF logo white, or yellow? That style of DF logo looks
familiar (EL perhaps?) but I can't recall any decal set that
includes it. There is no lading strap anchor symbol on 12098
but there is another symbol -- a thick white bar with center
circle (load divider perhaps?). It's just below the DF. Also
the car is marked XME.

Here's something -- the retainer valve is painted silver or
light gray!

From what can be seen of the roof, the seam caps are body
color. Could be overspray. It was not unusual for brand new
roofs to have shiny panels with dark, enameled seam caps.

If you find out any more facts let us know. I have the same
kit and I need the same information!

Tim

I am working on detailing and weathering some of the really nice Branchline kits that represent the DL&W, 12000 - 12099 series, 50' welded AAR boxcars with the billboard 'Lackawanna' scheme. As part of this detailing program I would like to utilize photo-etched running boards and brake steps.

My DL&W diagram book is only good until 5/1/52, and these cars were built in September, 1956, so I don't have a DL&W diagram sheet for them. Can any of you confirm the type of running board, brake step and brake wheel these cars had? The E-L diagram sheet (#7-7) indicates an Ajax brake wheel, but no running board option; I assume the Ajax brake wheel was original equipment.

I would also really like to re-number one into the 'D-F' scheme (numbers 12074 - 12099); any idea where the appropriate 'D-F' lettering may be found? Also cool to have would be the little loading strap anchor symbols - the circle with a vertical line: (I) .

The models come with a silver 'galvanized' roof; would it be appropriate to paint the ribs with black or freight car color to show a flaked paint effect?

I realize these are probably pushing the limits of the STMFC era, but would appreciate any guidance you can provide. Many thanks in advance;

Jim Harr


Re: Need information about several freight cars, circa Nov 1955-Sept 1957

Tim O'Connor
 

Brian, interesting about CMO cars -- they are not listed in my
1955 ORER but they do appear in the 1959 listing. Evidently they
were renumbered from 26001-26499 (244 cars) to 4992-5091 (98 cars)
in this time period. And in 1959 a new series 5092-5191 appears
with 6' doors (the others have 5' doors) -- I wonder what they
were?

Tim O'

At 4/4/2009 10:44 PM Saturday, you wrote:
I'm late to this party, but here are some more.
CGW 4820 Pretty sure this is a Steel ARA 1923 car assigned to hide service

CMO 5011
CMO 5031 Both of these are 40' stock cars
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

MDelvec952
 

In a message dated 04/05/09 19:21:23 Eastern Daylight Time, bnchmark@... writes:
My DL&W diagram book is only good until 5/1/52, and these cars were built in September, 1956, so I don't have a DL&W diagram sheet for them. Can any of you confirm the type of running board, brake step and brake wheel these cars had? The E-L diagram sheet (#7-7) indicates an Ajax brake wheel, but no running board option; I assume the Ajax brake wheel was original equipment.
-------------------

The DL&W general arrangement drawings for this batch call for Morton running boards and brake steps, Ajax hand brake, A-3 Ride Control trucks and welded sides.

I missed that Branchline was offering these, so I'm looking forward to seeing one, though they're too new for my goals, post steam-era.

Hope this helps ....Mike Del Vecchio


Re: DL&W 18000 series hoppers

MDelvec952
 

The GA drawings say 12'6" high, top of rail to the top of the running board, and 9'9" wide over side plates, 37' 0 3/4" truck centers.

....Mike

In a message dated 04/05/09 17:48:55 Eastern Daylight Time, BlackDiamondRR@... writes:
Mike and Ed,
Thanks for the 47' length on the DL&W soda ash hopper, and yes Ed, I
see I made a numerical error in my original post :-[ 18000-18099 is
more like it!
I am also wondering about the listed 12' height on these
cars.....to top of running board?
Ed, are the drawings at the Museum of Transportation in St Louis
available at the museum? I will be going there this coming summer for
the S scale convention.
Thanks again gents!
Bud Rindfleisch


Ramblings

rgspemkt@...
 

Schuyler wrote:
<<Robert Federle gave the first answer, here's the second: You have paint, I'm sure. A dab on the
<<tools you want to keep straight will assist. Since I am forever picking up the Phillips
<<screwdriver, instead of the straight bladed one, I have put a small red band around the Phillips.

I use various diameters of heat shrink tubing, cut about 1/4" long, then "shrunk" onto
the tool/screwdriver handle, etc.

The heat shrink tubing (not the shiny type) can be painted different colors
and the paint will stick around longer -- on the tubing.

JH




John Hitzeman
President/Owner
American Model Builders, Inc.
LASERKit (tm)
Our 26th Year!
St. Louis, MO
www.rgspemkt.com
www.ambstlouis.net
www.laserkit.com
amermodel@...
laserkit@...


Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

bnpmodeler
 

Greetings group;

I have searched the archives for a possible answer, but have come up short-handed, so I am firing away here.

I am working on detailing and weathering some of the really nice Branchline kits that represent the DL&W, 12000 - 12099 series, 50' welded AAR boxcars with the billboard 'Lackawanna' scheme. As part of this detailing program I would like to utilize photo-etched running boards and brake steps.

My DL&W diagram book is only good until 5/1/52, and these cars were built in September, 1956, so I don't have a DL&W diagram sheet for them. Can any of you confirm the type of running board, brake step and brake wheel these cars had? The E-L diagram sheet (#7-7) indicates an Ajax brake wheel, but no running board option; I assume the Ajax brake wheel was original equipment.

I would also really like to re-number one into the 'D-F' scheme (numbers 12074 - 12099); any idea where the appropriate 'D-F' lettering may be found? Also cool to have would be the little loading strap anchor symbols - the circle with a vertical line: (I) .

The models come with a silver 'galvanized' roof; would it be appropriate to paint the ribs with black or freight car color to show a flaked paint effect?

I realize these are probably pushing the limits of the STMFC era, but would appreciate any guidance you can provide. Many thanks in advance;

Jim Harr


Re: DL&W 18000 series hoppers

Ed Hawkins
 

On Apr 5, 2009, at 4:49 PM, Bud Rindfleisch wrote:

Ed, are the drawings at the Museum of Transportation in St Louis
available at the museum? I will be going there this coming summer for
the S scale convention.
Bud,
The AC&F drawings are at the museum, and they are stored in two
locations. Gaining access to them must be coordinated with the staff at
the MOT.

Drawings for the specific covered hopper car you want are in boxes
stored in a baggage-mail car. It's likely to be pretty hot & humid in
August when the S scale convention is being held. I can say from
experience that being inside the baggage-mail car on a hot day isn't
fun. Ted Culotta can also attest to this. I urge you to do any drawing
searches as early in the morning as possible. Your activities will need
to be coordinated with Nick Ohlman (NOhlman@...), who is on
the MOT staff in the library building.

For drawings of freight cars built from the early 1930s to 1941, they
are stored in steel cabinets in an air conditioned building. These
drawings are also a lot quicker and easier to pull for viewing and/or
for having copies made. The drawings in the baggage-mail car take much
more time and effort. First you have to get to the right box (the boxes
are stacked about 8 high), then the specific drawing numbers of
interest have to be found (typically each box holds around 100
drawings).

By the way, this baggage-mail car is being deaccessioned per a list of
exhibits that the MOT apparently believes is expendable. I have no idea
what the MOT will do with the drawings if a new home for the car is
found. We're talking about several hundred boxes of drawings.

Contact me off list and we can discuss specifics.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Rebuilt BX-13s, was Need information about several freight cars, circa Nov 1955-Sept 1957

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 5, 2009, at 11:31 AM, paulbizier wrote:
Richard - any chance I can get those pictures as well? IIRC, the
old Mainline Modeler article on the rebuilds didn't mention any
with diagonsl psnel roofs...




Here they are, Paul, though these photos don't show the diagonal
panel roof very clearly. However, that's definitely what was on the
rebuilt Bx-11s and Bx-13s, since the rebuilding started in 1951,
several years after the diagonal panel roof began to replace the
rectangular panel roof on both new and rebuilt cars.
Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: DL&W 18000 series hoppers

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Mike and Ed,
Thanks for the 47' length on the DL&W soda ash hopper, and yes Ed, I see I made a numerical error in my original post :-[ 18000-18099 is more like it!
I am also wondering about the listed 12' height on these cars.....to top of running board?
Ed, are the drawings at the Museum of Transportation in St Louis available at the museum? I will be going there this coming summer for the S scale convention.
Thanks again gents!
Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Wabash Boxcar in Atlanta, IL

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ray Breyer wrote:
Remember, "Sunday chicken dinner" was a big deal because chickens weren't eaten all that often (too expensive and valuable as egg makers). Today, chicken is the most eaten meat in America.
Also remember that those were what we now would call "free range chickens," much tastier than today's factory product. It's no accident that poultry cars were used to ship the entire chicken to market in that period. Another phrase to remember from that period is the political slogan, "a chicken in every pot," which may sound dumb if you're thinking of some of the "chicken-like" material you can find for sale today.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Wabash Boxcar in Atlanta, IL

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

Good grief! Did I really write that??? I should have said "Grain doors," not "Grain." I'm sure no one was confused but a little proof-reading isn't so hard to do.

Gene thinks faster than he types Green

--- In STMFC@..., "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@> wrote:
<snip>

I can think of at least four reasons why a "double door" box could be spotted at an elevator:
<snip>

And a fifth reason might be that the car was used to deliver grain doors. Grain, as you all know, were owned by the railroads which wanted them returned for reuse.

Gene Green

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