Date   

Re: What's in the hole?

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

I think I've answered my own question. I was able to zoom in on the oval opening. There is stenciling above the hole that I believe says "Brake Adjust" with an arrow pointing to the square shaft with the hole through it that protrudes out the left side of the opening a couple inches. The shaft goes into a housing with a handle on the right side (Kind of like the ones on the old Coke machines) I believe this handle has "release" cast on it. The handle can be easily reached through the right side of the oval.

This particular car was railroad built from a kit. The kit included the frame and bulkhead steel members. Don't know if the brakes were included. But, they have a housing with the adjuster and air release combined.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Walthers PRR N6b Cabin Car (Caboose)

Bruce Smith
 

paul,

Following what Brian has said, for 1947 PRR N6B cabin cars (The PRR did not call them cabeese) the following is most appropriate:

1) The lettering is "block" (sometimes called "Clarendon", which is not really correct), not Roman (It was NEVER Roman on the PRR!). That said, the Walthers lettering appears to be OK
2) The entire car including the roof should be "Freight car color", ie "red". A few cabins might have had black roofs in this period if they had been repaired with car cement and not repainted, but it was rare at best.
3) The hardware (grab irons) should be black.
4) The windows should only have sills, no frames. The first run of Walthers N6B cabins with off-set cupolas has frames, apparently added by the Chinese tool cutters because they thought "should be there"... and no-one at Walthers noticed. The new run of center cupola N6Bs has apparently fixed this issue, but I have been told that the 2nd run of offset cupola car may still have this problem.
5) 1947 is about the cut-off for cars with original K brakes and end railings, but if you plan to have several, you might consider backdating one.

The N6B remained the most common cabin car on the PRR through the late 1950s and were especially common on Lines West. In the post WWII years they tended to be downgraded to local and yard service, so this is the perfect cabin for anyone thinking of modeling a live local interchange with the PRR.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On Apr 6, 2009, at 10:48 PM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Circa 1947 would be Roman Lettering (not really roman) The Keystone versions
would not appear until 1954-55. I think in 1947 the cupola roof should be
the same color as the cabin car, I believe Black roofs on cabin cars were
later. Bruce Smith or Steve Hoxie may know more on the roof
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY
----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul & Bernice Hillman" <chris_hillman@msn.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 10:04 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Walthers PRR N6b Caboose


What were the eras or system areas that the 3 Walthers PRR N6b caboose
paint & lettering schemes represent? (Also, if "close" to accurate.)

Walthers #932-7651, etc.

1-Roman Lettering & bars.-"red" cupola-black roof.
2-Keystone at top.-grey cupola & roof.
3-Keystone in middle.-black cupola & roof.

I believe I saw these cabooses in the Chicago, Ill. area in the early
60's, but don't remember their schemes.

Didn't find this info in a search of this group's postings.

I want to get some for the Chicago area circa 1947.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: FGEX Single Sheathed Refrigerator Car

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

List,
 
       Lord help us, Mike has a Deputy Sheriff on board. Grammatical scores will be tabuated.
 
Fred Freitas

--- On Tue, 4/7/09, Barry Bennett <Barrybennetttoo@aol.com> wrote:


From: Barry Bennett <Barrybennetttoo@aol.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: FGEX Single Sheathed Refrigerator Car
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, April 7, 2009, 6:03 AM






--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@.. .> wrote:



There are a couple of photos .......unique. ........
These cars are not 'unique', but are 'unusual' or perhaps 'rarities' or some similar description but can NEVER be described as unique.

To be UNIQUE an item has to be a single, unduplicated object.

Barry Bennett

Self appointed member of the 'Prevention of the Abuse of the English Language Police.
















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: FGEX Single Sheathed Refrigerator Car

Barry Bennett <Barrybennetttoo@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "ed_mines" <ed_mines@...> wrote:



There are a couple of photos .......unique.........
These cars are not 'unique', but are 'unusual' or perhaps 'rarities' or some similar description but can NEVER be described as unique.

To be UNIQUE an item has to be a single, unduplicated object.

Barry Bennett

Self appointed member of the 'Prevention of the Abuse of the English Language Police.


Rare book on Ebay: Trains, Tracks and Tall Timbers - By Matt Coleman

Andrew Martin <groups@...>
 

Hi all;

I have up on Ebay at the moment the following book:
Trains, Tracks and Tall Timbers - By Matt Coleman
Item number: 270369526735

Ships from Australia and is one of the best books I have ever read in regard to understanding and modelling the lumber, pulp and paper industries. Does cover the era this group is interested in. Hope this is of interest to those of you on the list who may be interested and does not offend anyone with a sales message.

Yours sincerely
Andrew Martin
Melbourne
Australia


Re: Walthers PRR N6b Caboose

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

Circa 1947 would be Roman Lettering (not really roman) The Keystone versions
would not appear until 1954-55. I think in 1947 the cupola roof should be
the same color as the cabin car, I believe Black roofs on cabin cars were
later. Bruce Smith or Steve Hoxie may know more on the roof
Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: "Paul & Bernice Hillman" <chris_hillman@msn.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 10:04 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Walthers PRR N6b Caboose


What were the eras or system areas that the 3 Walthers PRR N6b caboose
paint & lettering schemes represent? (Also, if "close" to accurate.)

Walthers #932-7651, etc.

1-Roman Lettering & bars.-"red" cupola-black roof.
2-Keystone at top.-grey cupola & roof.
3-Keystone in middle.-black cupola & roof.

I believe I saw these cabooses in the Chicago, Ill. area in the early
60's, but don't remember their schemes.

Didn't find this info in a search of this group's postings.

I want to get some for the Chicago area circa 1947.

Thanks, Paul Hillman



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Walthers PRR N6b Caboose

pennsylvania1954
 

Paul--You want, in your words, "1-Roman Lettering & bars.-"red" cupola-black roof" for 1947. This scheme was good until 1955, but would have been seen after that.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Paul & Bernice Hillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

What were the eras or system areas that the 3 Walthers PRR N6b caboose paint & lettering schemes represent? (Also, if "close" to accurate.)

Walthers #932-7651, etc.

1-Roman Lettering & bars.-"red" cupola-black roof.
2-Keystone at top.-grey cupola & roof.
3-Keystone in middle.-black cupola & roof.

I believe I saw these cabooses in the Chicago, Ill. area in the early 60's, but don't remember their schemes.

Didn't find this info in a search of this group's postings.

I want to get some for the Chicago area circa 1947.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: SP&S 98 RS-3 in transit, 1955

Tim O'Connor
 

Indeed, new locomotives were being cranked out by EMD,
Alco, Baldwin et al maybe 50-60 locos a week in the late
40's and early 50's. NYC and railroads around Chicago must
have had this type of "load" fairly frequently.

Tim O'Connor

A "Very Interesting" kind of STMFC freight train load, if
this is correct!

Cheers,
David Turner,
Keeping the S. P. & S. Rwy. alive in Santa Rosa, California.


SP&S 98 Was: Need information about several freight cars, circa Nov 1955-Sept

David Turner
 

Rob,

Thank you for the more detailed information about the
sighting of SP&S 98 in a NYC train in Indiana in November
1955. Also, Tim's point about its weight being too much is
right on.

Rob said:
David, this car was reported in NYC Train LS7 on Friday,
November 24, 1955, between Toledo, OH, and Elkhart, IN.
This is how it appears in the transcription:

Initials Kind Number Wt./Tons Cargo Destination

SPS T 98 110 Diesel Vancouver,
WA

I posted an inquiry about this tank car and several others
in February 2009 and received a reply that there was no such
number, as the SP&S tank cars were in the 38000-series (see
Message #79347). I then found a reference on the SP&S Hist.
Society's website for an Intermountain tank car decorated as
SP&S X-85. This led me to think that perhaps the car in
Train LS7 was SP&S X-98, although it seemed odd that such an
"X" car would be so far from its home rails.

This car is truly a puzzlement.

Tim said:

The only SP&S tank cars with 70 ton capacity were 16,000
gallon cars 38600-38619. None of the SP&S tank
cars could tip the scales at 110 tons fully loaded. And
diesel fuel traveling from the midwest to the west coast??
Something's very fishy.

So upon further review I would suggest that if you ignore
the "T" kind of car in the report, the STMFC era "car" in
that train was likely to be:

SP&S locomotive #98, Alco built RS-3, delivered 1955
(construction number 81702, weight (in running order)
246,110 pounds) being transported to the Vancouver,
Washington, shops of the SP&S for set up and that it was
being transported without fuel, etc. so that it was less
than full running weight.

A "Very Interesting" kind of STMFC freight train load, if
this is correct!

Cheers,
David Turner,
Keeping the S. P. & S. Rwy. alive in Santa Rosa, California.


Re: Door Symbols, was Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions

bnpmodeler
 

Guy;

Thank you so much for the excellent and detailed description of these
symbols. That explains it - the DL&W 12000 - 12073 had lading strap anchors,
and the 12074 - 12099 had the 'auto parts' symbol, without vertical or
horizontal bars.

Many thanks again;

Jim Harr


Door Symbols, was Lackawanna 50 ft. boxcar questions
Posted by: "guycwilber@aol.com" guycwilber@aol.com freightcarguy
Mon Apr 6, 2009 1:51 pm (PDT)

In a message dated 4/5/2009 11:41:17 PM Central Daylight Time,
bnchmark@embarqmail.com writes:

I think that the 'D-F' is white; and the load restraining symbol is
different (can someone define these? I can try to post a scan of each type;
it would
seem that the early, non-D-F series had one style, and the D-F series had
another).

The symbol below the D-F indicated that the car was equipped to handle auto
parts. The keyhole symbol was first adopted as "recommended practice" and
became effective on August 1, 1946. The standard symbol was a 3" high by 10"

long bar with a 5" diameter disk centered on the line. The symbol was to be
solid white by specification, centered on the door (main door on double door

cars) and located three feet above the floor line.

This symbol was used as such until 1959 when its use was changed to indicate

cars equipped to handle containers. The same symbol bracketed by two
horizontal (1 1/2" x 7 1/2") white bars, one above and one below, was also
adopted
to indicate cars equipped with Spartan, Evans or Transco load restrainers.
The same symbol bracketed by two vertical bars was to be used on cars
equipped
with movable bulkheads. These markings were adopted as "recommended"
practice and became effective on March 1, 1960.

The circle with the vertical bar was the symbol used to indicate cars
equipped with lading strap anchors. The symbol was a 6" diameter, one inch
thick
circle with the vertical bar also 1" thick. The symbol was to be white and
located centered on the door (main door on double door cars) and three feet
above the floor line. The symbol was first proposed in 1953 and adopted as
"recommended" practice effective on March 1, 1954.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Brown Deer, WI


Re: Sunshine/Protowest AAR 70 ton flat cars

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Brian,
I just finished my NP kit. It makes a great looking car. I went for the weighted underframe version and made a few substitutions. I used the Kadee #78 scale couplers and individual board decking. Some of the boards were distressed and all were stained with artist oils and some highlighted with a warm grey design marker.

Thanks for the pioneering kit and all the research you do for us Richard.

Sincerely,
Rob Manley

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian J Carlson
To: stmfc@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 7:21 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Sunshine/Protowest AAR 70 ton flat cars


I have a Protowest AAR 70 ton flat car I want to get off the bench. Since
the car is a bit light I was tinking of forgoing the underframe detail and
filling the cavities with lead. However, I am not sure if any of the brake
gear should be visible below the sidesill. My photo collection is light on
flats. Can anyone who has built either a protowest or Sunshine car let me
know if any of the brake gear is visible below the sidesill.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Walthers PRR N6b Caboose

Paul Hillman
 

What were the eras or system areas that the 3 Walthers PRR N6b caboose paint & lettering schemes represent? (Also, if "close" to accurate.)

Walthers #932-7651, etc.

1-Roman Lettering & bars.-"red" cupola-black roof.
2-Keystone at top.-grey cupola & roof.
3-Keystone in middle.-black cupola & roof.

I believe I saw these cabooses in the Chicago, Ill. area in the early 60's, but don't remember their schemes.

Didn't find this info in a search of this group's postings.

I want to get some for the Chicago area circa 1947.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Need information about several freight cars, circa Nov 1955-Sept 1957; SP&S X-98

Allen Rueter
 

T in a wheel report could be for trailing or tow

--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO




________________________________
From: railsnw1 <railsnw@worldnet.att.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 6, 2009 11:15:44 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Need information about several freight cars, circa Nov 1955-Sept 1957; SP&S X-98


Rob,

I don't think we are looking at a car but at a diesel locomotive. Spokane, Portland and Seattle Ry. Alco RS-3 #98 was built in November 1955 as builders number 81702. Not sure about the T designation.

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "Rob Erickson" <pattirobpatti@ ...> wrote:

David, this car was reported in NYC Train LS7 on Friday, November 24, 1955, between Toledo, OH, and Elkhart, IN. This is how it appears in the transcription:

Initials Kind Number Wt./Tons Cargo Destination
SPS T 98 110 Diesel Vancouver, WA

I posted an inquiry about this tank car and several others in February 2009 and received a reply that there was no such number, as the SP&S tank cars were in the 38000-series (see Message #79347). I then found a reference on the SP&S Hist. Society's website for an Intermountain tank car decorated as SP&S X-85. This led me to think that perhaps the car in Train LS7 was SP&S X-98, although it seemed odd that such an "X" car would be so far from its home rails.

This car is truly a puzzlement.

Thanks,
Rob Erickson


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, David Turner <spsrwyfan@> wrote:

...snip
SP&S X-98 TM
snip...

From 02/03/1954 to 03/11/1957, SP&S X-98 (second) was a MOW
flat car, 40 ft seven inches between end sills, 40 ton,
truss-rod, steel center sill, eleven stake pockets, with a
4,000 gallon water tank mounted. It was purchased from
parent GN in 1945 and up until 1954, it was flatcar #31620
in revenue service. In 1940, GN had converted a Haskell &
Barker boxcar, built 1913, to a flat car, and renumbered it
to the 62000 series.

There are photos of a similar car, X-104, on pages 48 and
100 of Ed Austin's "Spokane, Portland and Seattle Color
Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment, Morning Sun Books,
1998. It is unknown if the tank on X-98 was the same
appearance as the one shown on X-104.

I would appreciate hearing more about when and where this
car was reported.

Cheers,
David Turner
Keeping the S. P. & S. Rwy alive in Santa Rosa, California


Re: freight car, circa Nov 1955-Sept 1957; SP&S X-98

Allen Rueter
 

When I look up SPSX I get Progress Rail Services Corporation
Tho it may not be steam era
--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO




________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 6, 2009 6:35:34 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Need information about several freight cars, circa Nov 1955-Sept 1957; SP&S X-98


The only SP&S tank cars with 70 ton capacity were
16,000 gallon cars 38600-38619. None of the SP&S tank
cars could tip the scales at 110 tons fully loaded.
And diesel fuel traveling from the midwest to the
west coast?? Something's very fishy.

Tim O'Connor

David, this car was reported in NYC Train LS7 on Friday,
November 24, 1955, between Toledo, OH, and Elkhart, IN.
This is how it appears in the transcription:

Initials Kind Number Wt./Tons Cargo Destination
SPS T 98 110 Diesel Vancouver, WA

I posted an inquiry about this tank car and several others
in February 2009 and received a reply that there was no such
number, as the SP&S tank cars were in the 38000-series (see
Message #79347). I then found a reference on the SP&S Hist.
Society's website for an Intermountain tank car decorated as
SP&S X-85. This led me to think that perhaps the car in Train
LS7 was SP&S X-98, although it seemed odd that such an "X" car
would be so far from its home rails.

This car is truly a puzzlement.

Thanks,
Rob Erickson


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, David Turner <spsrwyfan@. ..> wrote:

...snip
SP&S X-98 TM
snip...

From 02/03/1954 to 03/11/1957, SP&S X-98 (second) was a MOW
flat car, 40 ft seven inches between end sills, 40 ton,
truss-rod, steel center sill, eleven stake pockets, with a
4,000 gallon water tank mounted. It was purchased from
parent GN in 1945 and up until 1954, it was flatcar #31620
in revenue service. In 1940, GN had converted a Haskell &
Barker boxcar, built 1913, to a flat car, and renumbered it
to the 62000 series.

There are photos of a similar car, X-104, on pages 48 and
100 of Ed Austin's "Spokane, Portland and Seattle Color
Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment, Morning Sun Books,
1998. It is unknown if the tank on X-98 was the same
appearance as the one shown on X-104.

I would appreciate hearing more about when and where this
car was reported.

Cheers,
David Turner
Keeping the S. P. & S. Rwy alive in Santa Rosa, California


Re: Sunshine/Protowest AAR 70 ton flat cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 6, 2009, at 5:21 PM, Brian J Carlson wrote:
I have a Protowest AAR 70 ton flat car I want to get off the bench.
Since
the car is a bit light I was tinking of forgoing the underframe
detail and
filling the cavities with lead. However, I am not sure if any of
the brake
gear should be visible below the sidesill. My photo collection is
light on
flats. Can anyone who has built either a protowest or Sunshine car
let me
know if any of the brake gear is visible below the sidesill.








The only brake gear that's even remotely visible when the car is on
the track is the brake rods to the trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Sunshine/Protowest AAR 70 ton flat cars

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

I have a Protowest AAR 70 ton flat car I want to get off the bench. Since
the car is a bit light I was tinking of forgoing the underframe detail and
filling the cavities with lead. However, I am not sure if any of the brake
gear should be visible below the sidesill. My photo collection is light on
flats. Can anyone who has built either a protowest or Sunshine car let me
know if any of the brake gear is visible below the sidesill.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


duplicate back issue of "The Double A"

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi,

I have a duplicate back issue of "The Double A", which is the "Quarterly Publication of the Ann Arbor Railroad Technical And Historical Association" - Vol 13 number 3 Fall 1997.

It has a nice article on "Ann Arbor Railroad 1200/90000 Series USRA Single Sheathed Box Cars" in it - obligatory STMFC content!

Since it is a duplicate, I have no need for it, but it seems a shame to throw it away. So I'm happy to mail it for free to anyone who wants it - send me your mailing address.

Thanks - Claus Schlund


Re: What's in the hole?

rfederle@...
 

Thanks Tim,

Glad you clarified that. Makes sense and I suppose I was only thinking one sided. Since you mentioned it I see cars all the time being shuffled around with air hoses disconnected.

Thanks for the summary of operation.

Robert Federle
---- Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Nope. Air pressure is needed to hold the brakes (if
the hand brake is not used).

You're confusing two things. A drop in line pressure
causes the AB valve to move air from one side of the
reservoir to the other, which sets the brakes when the
train is moving. When the line pressure returns the
air is released, releasing the brakes. The retainer
valve can slow this latter effect, so that the brakes
don't release immediately.

But once the brakes have been applied a couple of times,
it's necessary to recharge the air pressure in all of
the reservoirs or it will not be possible to stop the
train. (Hence the retainers.) If the reserve pressure
is lost, you get a runaway train!

In a yard, generally all of the cars are bled off so the
cars can be moved around easily. Engine brakes are used
when moving cars, and hand brakes are set to hold them
in place.

Many yards have air lines on the ground. These are used
to charge a string of cars in preparation for being put
into a train.

Tim O'Connor



At 4/6/2009 04:02 PM Monday, you wrote:
I could be wrong but when you dump the air the brakes set, not release. I believe air pressure is applied to release. If the air is dumped then brakes apply.

I stand to be corrected though.

Robert Federle
---- Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Brake release rod -- when the brakeman wants to dump the
air from the reservoir to release the brakes. All freight
cars have them but they're rarely modeled.

Tim O'Connor

At 4/6/2009 10:10 AM Monday, you wrote:
I took some photos last year of a GSC flat car. I even took a photo of the oval access hole in the one side. There's something back there. I'd like to know what it is.
Thanks,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: What's in the hole?

Tim O'Connor
 

Nope. Air pressure is needed to hold the brakes (if
the hand brake is not used).

You're confusing two things. A drop in line pressure
causes the AB valve to move air from one side of the
reservoir to the other, which sets the brakes when the
train is moving. When the line pressure returns the
air is released, releasing the brakes. The retainer
valve can slow this latter effect, so that the brakes
don't release immediately.

But once the brakes have been applied a couple of times,
it's necessary to recharge the air pressure in all of
the reservoirs or it will not be possible to stop the
train. (Hence the retainers.) If the reserve pressure
is lost, you get a runaway train!

In a yard, generally all of the cars are bled off so the
cars can be moved around easily. Engine brakes are used
when moving cars, and hand brakes are set to hold them
in place.

Many yards have air lines on the ground. These are used
to charge a string of cars in preparation for being put
into a train.

Tim O'Connor

At 4/6/2009 04:02 PM Monday, you wrote:
I could be wrong but when you dump the air the brakes set, not release. I believe air pressure is applied to release. If the air is dumped then brakes apply.

I stand to be corrected though.

Robert Federle
---- Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Brake release rod -- when the brakeman wants to dump the
air from the reservoir to release the brakes. All freight
cars have them but they're rarely modeled.

Tim O'Connor

At 4/6/2009 10:10 AM Monday, you wrote:
I took some photos last year of a GSC flat car. I even took a photo of the oval access hole in the one side. There's something back there. I'd like to know what it is.
Thanks,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: What's in the hole?

Tim O'Connor
 

Clark

Hmmmm... looking over my 94 JPEG's of GSC flat cars I think
you may be correct. That oval hole only appears in some of the
photos. Is it only on one side of the car?

The brake release rod is visible in many of the photos, but it
is a small circular hole with the rod (with a bend in it for a
handle) sticking out several inches.

Tim O'Connor

Thanks Tim, only this car has a square shaft with a hole through it sticking out. Slack adjuster?
Clark Propst

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Brake release rod -- when the brakeman wants to dump the
air from the reservoir to release the brakes. All freight
cars have them but they're rarely modeled.

Tim O'Connor

At 4/6/2009 10:10 AM Monday, you wrote:
I took some photos last year of a GSC flat car. I even took a photo of the oval access hole in the one side. There's something back there. I'd like to know what it is.
Thanks,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

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