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Re: spring Plankless truck help

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

I can envision truck side frames without journal box lids and a sprue of a variety of lids which the modeler could attach in a mix or match fashion.<
Remember that Tichy makes a truck with separate journal box lids. Only one type came with the truck but it has been done.
While I think that Tahoe's Brian Leppert makes the best trucks available, styrene with inserts is another way to go. This would allow separate lids.

Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time has stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: spring Plankless truck help

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

I need to learn to read all the messages before responding to any message. Much of what I said below was said [written] sooner and better by Dennis Storzek in message 81036.

I apologize for re-plowing the same field.

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Gene Green" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "leakinmywaders" <leakinmywaders@> wrote:
<snip> ... they might be tooled represent different journal box lid designs, ... <snip>

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT
The freight bills of materials I have seen show that the railroads specified journal box lids as a separate item. That means, I believe, that the same truck side frame might have one style journal box lid on railroad ABC while the same truck side frame might have an entirely different journal box lid on railroad XYZ.

Journal box lids were interchangeable. A given size journal box required a journal box lid of the corresponding size but each journal box lid manufacturer made their journal box lids in a range of sizes.

I have seen freight car trucks with several different journal box lids. It would be an interesting, but perhaps really hard to see, modeling detail to be able to swap journal box lids on our model freight car trucks. I can envision truck side frames without journal box lids and a sprue of a variety of lids which the modeler could attach in a mix or match fashion.

Gene Green


Re: spring Plankless truck help

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "leakinmywaders" <leakinmywaders@...> wrote:
<snip> ... they might be tooled represent different journal box lid designs, ... <snip>

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT
The freight bills of materials I have seen show that the railroads specified journal box lids as a separate item. That means, I believe, that the same truck side frame might have one style journal box lid on railroad ABC while the same truck side frame might have an entirely different journal box lid on railroad XYZ.

Journal box lids were interchangeable. A given size journal box required a journal box lid of the corresponding size but each journal box lid manufacturer made their journal box lids in a range of sizes.

I have seen freight car trucks with several different journal box lids. It would be an interesting, but perhaps really hard to see, modeling detail to be able to swap journal box lids on our model freight car trucks. I can envision truck side frames without journal box lids and a sprue of a variety of lids which the modeler could attach in a mix or match fashion.

Gene Green


Re: Inside measure of wheelset lengths, was RE: Re: Semi-Scale W

David North <davenorth@...>
 

If you do want to drill the stainless steel calipers, the carbide drills
from Drill City will do the job.

I recently adapted 6" digital calipers to my lathe and mill to give be
digital readouts, and I drilled the caliper bodies with these drill bits.

Go easy though. The drills are very sharp and hold their edge well, but they
are brittle.

Cheers

Dave


FMYX 101, 102 and 103.

cdnrailmarine <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

Hello:

Wondering if anyone can offer information and/or photos of the following three tanks cars listed in the 1954 OER?

FMYX 101, 102 and 103.

Per the Offical Equipment Register:
Report movement and mileage to:
Owner (non shipper) North end of Great Northern Dock foot of Campbell Avenue Vancouver, BC Canada.

FM Yorke was a tugboat company operating in the Vancouver area that specilized in rail-barge towing, building in the 1960's two self propelled car ferries. This company later became part of Seaspan.

Cars are all "TM"s, with 102 and 103 having heater coils.

I am wondering if these cars may have been used to transport oil from the Vancouver area refineries to the FM Yorke dock?

Appreciate any information, thanks Ross McLeod Calgary


Re: Hopper info wanted

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Jim, I forgot to put the M&StL number series in my post they were in the 64501 series. There are photos of almost all the second hand cars bought around 1940 (Like the one on RR-pictures), but nothing I know of for this series.
Thamks,
Clark Propst

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jim_mischke" <jmischke@...> wrote:


Two thoughts, Clark

1) I have identified secondhand hopper candidates with their cubic capacities, other dimensions to confirm. With B&O, I have a lot of this to do.

It takes about 3 hours to skim an entire ORER, looking at cubic capacity column only. Less if the match occurs near the front.


2) The rr-pictures site has a 1942 M&StL twin ribbed hopper in a publicity still in its photo archive. Contributed by Merrill Price. Is this the one? One can make out the word 'Chicago" under the paint in the upper left of the car. Chicago Freight Car?


Re: spring Plankless truck help

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "sparachuk" <sparachuk@...> wrote:


Brian: I wish I were more expert on this matter myself but among the differences to notice in these trucks consider the shape of the journal boxes and the shape of the journal lids. All these trucks you are mentioning are different in these areas. To add to the excitement and/or confusion, there is also the TMW Buckeye 50 ton ARA truck. I have more questions than answers myself. I just try to compare photos of the car I am building with the trucks on hand and hope I am coming close. That's one reason I have a drawer full of trucks. The grand kids are going to have fun with that drawer some day!

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto
Steve,

Journal lids were often not manufactured by the foundry that cast the trucks, but were a specialty onto themselves. Different railroads could, and did, order different style lids. In later years it was not uncommon to see a mix of styles on the same car, even on the same truck, especially on cars in work service.

The journal BOXES, however, are part of the side frame casting, and should be the same. Differences likely arise from different placement of the parting line for the model part, and different theories of how much draft angle is needed in the mold.

Dennis


Fw: [model-railroad-hobbyist] Model Railroad Hobbyist Issue 2 - spread the word!

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

All,

FYI

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: MRH News Desk
To: model-railroad-hobbyist@googlegroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 13, 2009 3:39 AM
Subject: [model-railroad-hobbyist] Model Railroad Hobbyist Issue 2 - spread the word!


MODEL RAILROAD HOBBYIST ISSUE 2 - UPDATE


While we've experienced a some minor issues for a few people, the launch of Model Railroad Hobbyist issue 2 is going very well compared to the fire drill we had with the initial release of Issue 1! Our servers are handling the load quite well the time with plenty of capacity to spare.

If you're one of the few who tried in the last 24 hours to get MRH Issue 2 PREMIUM Edition and had problems, we encourage you to try again! We've corrected the "5pm message" oversight (we neglected to change the message, even though the download link was fine) and the PREMIUM Edition should download for you without any problems.


DOWNLOADS OPENED UP TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC
Because our servers are handling the load so well, we've elected to open up the downloads to everyone, not just subscribers. So pass the word to all your model railroading friends that MRH Issue 2 is available free to everyone for download.

Help us break our previous 30,000 downloads for Issue 1 ... forward this email to all your model railroading friends who may not know about MRH yet!
_______________________________________________________
THE MODEL RAILROAD HOBBYIST TEAM
http:model-railroad-hobbyist.com


Re: Semi-Scale Wheelsets for IMRC 70-Ton Trucks

tmolsen@...
 

My note regarding the disparity between the axle lengths on the IMRC 70-Ton trucks has generated a large number of opinions. It has been quite interesting to read the many posts regarding this problem and the many ideas as to how to correct the problem and also what has caused this situation to occur.

The best trucks for roll-ability right out of the box with standard wheelsets that I have found were the Kato A3 trucks which the market a number of years ago. I found it amusing that some people complained that they could not get good trucks that would roll freely, then when they tried these, they complained that they rolled to freely (ie. put a car in a siding with a little bit of slope to it and the car would roll out after being uncoupled. I guess they never heard of wheel chocks!).

My thanks to all that have responded with a wealth of information regarding this situation and your personal experiences. I think Denny has summed it all up in his comment regarding the replacement of sub-standard wheelsets and in doing so gave him a lot of satisfaction in trouble free operation.

Thanks guys for your comments and opinions.

Best regards,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu


Re: spring Plankless truck help

leakinmywaders
 

Brian and Stephan: Richard Hendrickson or Tahoe's Brian Leppert will likely weigh in, but when I asked Brian some time ago whether the Tahoe spring plankless double truss truck represented the same prototype as the Proto2000 spring plankless truck, he told me yes. I don't know for certain how specific he meant to be in that answer, however (or how specific he understood my question to be), so I'm also curious to hear more on this. The only apparent intentional differences between these 2 trucks to my eye are that 1) they might be tooled represent different journal box lid designs, and 2) the appearance of the doubled trusses; the latter is lacking altogether on the Proto2000 trucks. Of course the fidelity to detail on the Tahoe trucks is especially outstanding, so I had wondered whether the doubled truss was a matter of tooling sophistication or rather of the P2K truck possibly representing a single-truss design.

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "sparachuk" <sparachuk@...> wrote:


Brian: I wish I were more expert on this matter myself but among the differences to notice in these trucks consider the shape of the journal boxes and the shape of the journal lids. All these trucks you are mentioning are different in these areas. To add to the excitement and/or confusion, there is also the TMW Buckeye 50 ton ARA truck. I have more questions than answers myself. I just try to compare photos of the car I am building with the trucks on hand and hope I am coming close. That's one reason I have a drawer full of trucks. The grand kids are going to have fun with that drawer some day!

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Re: spring Plankless truck help

sparachuk <sparachuk@...>
 

Brian: I wish I were more expert on this matter myself but among the differences to notice in these trucks consider the shape of the journal boxes and the shape of the journal lids. All these trucks you are mentioning are different in these areas. To add to the excitement and/or confusion, there is also the TMW Buckeye 50 ton ARA truck. I have more questions than answers myself. I just try to compare photos of the car I am building with the trucks on hand and hope I am coming close. That's one reason I have a drawer full of trucks. The grand kids are going to have fun with that drawer some day!

Stephan Parachuk
Toronto


Panel-side hoppers in Model Railroad Hobbyist v2

David Smith
 

Richard Hendrickson has a brief article on panel side hoppers, with a number
of helpful photos, in the just-released issue of Model Railroad Hobbyist:
http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/ It's free with registration. I can
only get to the low-tech Mac version so I don't know if there are more bells
and whistles on the high-bandwidth PC version.

Dave Smith

--
David L. Smith
Da Vinci Science Center
Allentown, PA
http://www.davinci-center.org

Please consider the environment before printing this email.

Everything that needs to be said has already been said. But since no one was
listening, everything must be said again. -- Andre Gide


Re: Semi-Scale Wheelsets for IMRC 70-Ton Trucks

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Not to mention that each conical hole has its own axial center, and the presumption in the whole scenario is that the the opposing axial centers are perfectly coincident, perfectly parallel to the adjacent axle's centerline, and located properly relative to the kingpin axis. Or, if not perfect, at least significantly closer than the error caused/tolerated by a .005 increment in axle length. Otherwise there'd be no point in the exercise in the first place.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Denny Anspach

Measuring the inside diameter between the points of the conical
bearing holes is an effort that is better in the thinking than in the
doing. The thinking presumes that the bearing holes actually have
conical points, and that such an accurate measurement between them
would then accurately predict what the ideal axle length would likely
be. It doesn't quite work out this way inasmuch as the truck bearing
"cones" are never perfect, and in fact are commonly either actually
flat, of flattened curvature, quite assymetric, or any combination of
the three. So quite (most!) often, an axle whose length theoretically
seems to be ideally fitted in any given instance, while in real time
it does not roll worth a hoot.


spring Plankless truck help

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

I need an opinion and I know I'll get one from the list :-). I'm going
through my box of trucks to try to organize it, and I have a variety of
Spring-plankless trucks.
I have P2k/Walthers spring plankless trucks,
Tahoe Model Works double truss trucks
IM ASF spring planless trucks with 5 x9 bearing size cast on the sideframe.
Branchline Barber S2A

Do all these trucks represent the same spring plankless truck? I can tell
the difference between spring plank and spring plankless trucks, but other
than the Barber S2a I can't really see a difference between the trucks. The
better detailing and molding on the TMW is obvious but I am more interested
if these three represent different trucks or are they similar enough to be
interchangeable(at least in HO scale)

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: decals needed

jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

Ted Schnepf (a Naperville vendor regular) did the artwork for a recent M-53 O scale resin wagontop. You will find most of the ingredients you need in that decal set. Proper fonts and heralds in correct sizes. Lettering is spaced for ribbing. Probably available separately.

Also, check out the B&OHS archives web site (www.borhs.org) and look for the downloadable Chris Barkan scorecard of B&O boxcar lettering schemes. Near the bottom of the web page full of downloadables. It will make sence for you of all the B&O boxcar letterings.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, bill davis <billcheri72@...> wrote:

Hi all,
I'm planning to build a B&O M-26a in O scale. Does anyone know of a set of decals that can be used for the car. looking for a early to mid 40's lettering scheme. Thanks
BILL







Re: Hopper info wanted

jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

Two thoughts, Clark

1) I have identified secondhand hopper candidates with their cubic capacities, other dimensions to confirm. With B&O, I have a lot of this to do.

It takes about 3 hours to skim an entire ORER, looking at cubic capacity column only. Less if the match occurs near the front.


2) The rr-pictures site has a 1942 M&StL twin ribbed hopper in a publicity still in its photo archive. Contributed by Merrill Price. Is this the one? One can make out the word 'Chicago" under the paint in the upper left of the car. Chicago Freight Car?

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Clark Propst" <cepropst@...> wrote:

I'm looking for a photo or at least someone to tell me what model in close (stand in) for an NYC 2 bay hopper sold to Hyman-Michaels in 1942 or before with the dimensions of:
Inside Length 30' width 9' 5 1/2" Outside length 31' 2 1/2" Height from rail 10' Extreme height 10' 7" Capacity 1650 cu ft, 100000lbs
The M&StL picked up these NYC hoppers from Hyman-Michaels in 1942. The data comes from their page in the 1945 ORER.
I looked in the 1940 ORER and couldn't find a match for thee dimensions.
Any help is much appreciated, thanks,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa



Hopper info wanted

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

I'm looking for a photo or at least someone to tell me what model in close (stand in) for an NYC 2 bay hopper sold to Hyman-Michaels in 1942 or before with the dimensions of:
Inside Length 30' width 9' 5 1/2" Outside length 31' 2 1/2" Height from rail 10' Extreme height 10' 7" Capacity 1650 cu ft, 100000lbs
The M&StL picked up these NYC hoppers from Hyman-Michaels in 1942. The data comes from their page in the 1945 ORER.
I looked in the 1940 ORER and couldn't find a match for thee dimensions.
Any help is much appreciated, thanks,
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Semi-Scale Wheelsets for IMRC 70-Ton Trucks

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Like many other aspects of our hobby, this is just another instance where we are again faced with givens and druthers.

Measuring the inside diameter between the points of the conical bearing holes is an effort that is better in the thinking than in the doing. The thinking presumes that the bearing holes actually have conical points, and that such an accurate measurement between them would then accurately predict what the ideal axle length would likely be. It doesn't quite work out this way inasmuch as the truck bearing "cones" are never perfect, and in fact are commonly either actually flat, of flattened curvature, quite assymetric, or any combination of the three. So quite (most!) often, an axle whose length theoretically seems to be ideally fitted in any given instance, while in real time it does not roll worth a hoot.


The most objective means of selecting ideal axle length is with some type of measurable actual roll testing against a standard; which in turn has to be balanced against the thoroughly subjective judgement of axle end play, i.e. "enough" but " not too much".

As a personal note, I have found over the six or more years that I have been testing and installing axle/wheel sets routinely "to order", this has been one of my most rewarding efforts, resulting in my current fair sized fleet of very free rolling cars that, in addition, do not sway or swagger their way down the track. The latter good behavior in turn also enabled me to make practical the use of semi scale couplers as a standard.

Denny


Re: Axle lengths...

Gene Green <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Lucas" <stevelucas3@...> wrote:

Just a thought. I have watched plain bearing wheelsets move back and forth laterally while these trucks were in motion. So maybe a little side play is actually quite prototypical, or does this readily translate to a model? Or is it desirable, considering model "needlepoint" journal versus prototype truck cylindrical journal construction?

Steve Lucas.
It strikes me that side-to-side play in our model trucks (HO at least) would cause the car to move up and down on one side or alternating up and down movements on each side. Just how notieable that would be is another question. And, as a practical matter, would the side-to-side movement cause difficulty with tracking or coupling?

Perhaps that would replicate the weaving and bobbing we often see or saw in passing freight trains.

Gene Green


Axle lengths...

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Just a thought. I have watched plain bearing wheelsets move back and forth laterally while these trucks were in motion. So maybe a little side play is actually quite prototypical, or does this readily translate to a model? Or is it desirable, considering model "needlepoint" journal versus prototype truck cylindrical journal construction?

Steve Lucas.

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