Date   

Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

estcbq@...
 

the Railmodel Journal of April 1990 has Mr Hendrickson's part 11 of his article titled Freight Car Trucks a Modeler's Guide. Part I appeared in the February 1990 issue of RMJ. Very useful information very well presented--jim young

-----Original Message-----
From: Merlyn Lauber <mlauber4@mchsi.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, 6 Jun 2009 7:48 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?








Brian,

You might check your local hobby shop as we have the Coal Car book in stock.

Merlyn Lauber
Caboose Stop Hobbies

----- Original Message -----
From: cobrapsl@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, June 06, 2009 2:07 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

Brian,

Not sure where you are looking, Abe's used books had six or so new copies for sale yesterday, when I did the seach.

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@mchsi.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, 6 Jun 2009 11:41 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

The chapter on trucks in Bob Karig's book on Coal Cars, published by the University of Chicago Press, is an indispensable guide to the development of truck technology. <
Richard,

A search of three major used book databases failed to discover a copy of this book for sale. However, I did discover new copies of two Karig books for sale via the U. of Chicago publications Web site. There, I found that the chapter on freight car trucks in the "Coal Cars" book runs to
48 pages.

My goal is to draw a number of transition-era trucks in 3D. May I ask you if Karig's book provides drawings, straight-on photos or other information about trucks I would find useful to achieve my goal?

Thanks much,

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

----------------------

Martin Robert Karig III
Coal Cars
The First Three Hundred Years
400 pages, 608 halftones 8-1/2 x 11
Cloth $75.00

Martin Robert Karig III
Hard Coal and Coal Cars
Hauling Anthracite on the New York, Ontario & Western Railway
220 pages, 200 halftones 8-1/2 x 11 © 2006
Cloth $55.00

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Packers Car Line

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

I understand that the Burlington was the camouflaged owner of the Packers Car Line, formed to provide Armour & Company with more modern reefers - PCX 4000-4399 built in 1956 by Pacific Car & Foundry.

According to the 1968 ORER, there was also PCX 4400 - 4600 of similar size. Can anyone advise when these were built and by whom?

Thanks

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

Merlyn Lauber
 

Brian,

You might check your local hobby shop as we have the Coal Car book in stock.

Merlyn Lauber
Caboose Stop Hobbies

----- Original Message -----
From: cobrapsl@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, June 06, 2009 2:07 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?





Brian,

Not sure where you are looking, Abe's used books had six or so new copies for sale yesterday, when I did the seach.

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@mchsi.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, 6 Jun 2009 11:41 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

> The chapter on trucks in Bob Karig's book on Coal Cars, published by the University of Chicago Press, is an indispensable guide to the development of truck technology. <

Richard,

A search of three major used book databases failed to discover a copy of this book for sale. However, I did discover new copies of two Karig books for sale via the U. of Chicago publications Web site. There, I found that the chapter on freight car trucks in the "Coal Cars" book runs to 48 pages.

My goal is to draw a number of transition-era trucks in 3D. May I ask you if Karig's book provides drawings, straight-on photos or other information about trucks I would find useful to achieve my goal?

Thanks much,

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

----------------------

Martin Robert Karig III
Coal Cars
The First Three Hundred Years
400 pages, 608 halftones 8-1/2 x 11
Cloth $75.00

Martin Robert Karig III
Hard Coal and Coal Cars
Hauling Anthracite on the New York, Ontario & Western Railway
220 pages, 200 halftones 8-1/2 x 11 © 2006
Cloth $55.00


Re: Rolling stock as scenery

Armand Premo
 

This may not be as far fetched as it may seem.In Alburgh on the Rutland, foreign hoppers would be stored awaiting unloading in a rather large coal facility.The coal would then be transferred to company wooden hopper bottomed Gons for storage or on line delivery to other on-line coaling facilities.It was not unusual to see long strings of these cars waiting to be loaded.Several ballast gons were also on hand to be loaded with ashes from the ash pit which then would be used elsewhere on the line.Thus these seemingly unglamorous cars could be considered scenery,but were an active part of the daily operations at this terminal.I suspect that this practice was not unique to the Rutland.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis Storzek
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, June 06, 2009 8:36 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Rolling stock as scenery





--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@...> wrote:

> Maybe that's how to overcome the Better Homes & Gardens effect - put a line of idle gons or box cars on the far track, or at the end of a few sidings. They wouldn't be a factor in an operating session so presumably wouldn't impose themselves on your conscienceness. They'd just be there, as scenery, "present but not voting".
>
> Just some thoughts of a wandering mind.
>
> Tom Madden
>

The problem with that is most layouts already have a track to scenery ratio that's way out of kilter. However, Tom raises a good point; storage tracks could really be part of the scenery, track along the backdrop, or even behind background buildings, that aren't physically connected to the rest of the layout. Might even represent part of another railroad's yard... we don't know, because we'll never move the cars.

If the layout is large enough, this problem tends to diminish. When I run Defiance Yard on John Swanson's DW&LS, I classify cars for an eight hour trick (four actual hours) and build several outbound trains. But, I have some classifications that only go out on one train every twenty four hours, so some of those cars have been sitting in the yard for three sessions when they finally leave.

Bill Darnaby's Maumee Route is much the same; each session only runs twelve hours, so the locals only switch the towns every other session.

On both layouts there are cars that have been sitting quietly in the background for a while.

Dennis






------------------------------------------------------------------------------



No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 8.5.339 / Virus Database: 270.12.54/2159 - Release Date: 06/06/09 18:04:00


Re: Rolling stock as scenery

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@...> wrote:

Maybe that's how to overcome the Better Homes & Gardens effect - put a line of idle gons or box cars on the far track, or at the end of a few sidings. They wouldn't be a factor in an operating session so presumably wouldn't impose themselves on your conscienceness. They'd just be there, as scenery, "present but not voting".

Just some thoughts of a wandering mind.

Tom Madden
The problem with that is most layouts already have a track to scenery ratio that's way out of kilter. However, Tom raises a good point; storage tracks could really be part of the scenery, track along the backdrop, or even behind background buildings, that aren't physically connected to the rest of the layout. Might even represent part of another railroad's yard... we don't know, because we'll never move the cars.

If the layout is large enough, this problem tends to diminish. When I run Defiance Yard on John Swanson's DW&LS, I classify cars for an eight hour trick (four actual hours) and build several outbound trains. But, I have some classifications that only go out on one train every twenty four hours, so some of those cars have been sitting in the yard for three sessions when they finally leave.

Bill Darnaby's Maumee Route is much the same; each session only runs twelve hours, so the locals only switch the towns every other session.

On both layouts there are cars that have been sitting quietly in the background for a while.

Dennis


Re: Rolling stock as scenery

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Tom Madden says:

"I don't have a layout but occasionally operate on the layouts of friends. It's always bothered me that, at the end of a session, every piece of rolling stock on the layout has been dealt with."

I guess you haven't operated here yet.<G>. Heck, we end up with entire trains that never move during a session. Most of the time they can't [ something's in the way ]. Sometimes we don't even know where they are. I try to operate realistically.<G>.

Maybe that's how to overcome the Better Homes & Gardens effect - put a line of idle gons or box cars on the far track, or at the end of a few sidings. They wouldn't be a factor in an operating session so presumably wouldn't impose themselves on your conscienceness.
Well...such cars...sometimes significant numbers...regretfully do become factors in my sessions. Bruce Smith might say, "What are these gons doing on the far siding at Buford? They're in the way." My reply:

Bill Schneider replies: "Buford? Who cares..."

They'd just be there, as scenery, "present but not voting".

You're kidding...right?

Mike Brock


Re: Highliners kits

Andy Carlson
 

I used to sell a lot of the highliners. Now I haven't any distributor that carries them, so I am left out cold. Sorry.
-Andy




________________________________
From: Dave Pfeiffer <dave.pfeiffer@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, June 6, 2009 4:29:21 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Highliners kits





Andy,

Do you have any Highliners F unit kits? I'm looking for some "A" units.
Thanks.

Dave Pfeiffer


Highliners kits

Dave Pfeiffer
 

Andy,

Do you have any Highliners F unit kits? I'm looking for some "A" units. Thanks.

Dave Pfeiffer


Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 6, 2009, at 11:41 AM, Brian Chapman wrote:

My goal is to draw a number of transition-era trucks in 3D. May I
ask you if Karig's book provides drawings, straight-on photos or
other information about trucks I would find useful to achieve my goal?




You would certainly find Karig's book helpful. Also, there are
numerous drawings and photos of trucks in the truck section of each
of the Car Builders' Cyclopedias of that era. If you are interested
in trucks that remained in use during the transition era (in contrast
to having been designed or first introduced in that period), the
CBCycs from the 'teens through the 1940s would be worth consulting.
These are available in large libraries and at some railroad museums
(e.g., the California State RR Musem library in Sacramento, which
also has a number of RR drawings of freight car trucks from the Santa
Fe and Southern Pacific mechanical department files).

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Rolling stock as scenery

Tim O'Connor
 

I totally agree Tom. The North Shore club has an ideal spot
for a RIP facility, with 3 stub tracks on the aisle near the
main yard and engine facility. I've advocated modeling this
as a car repair facility and actually leaving two tracks open
for genuine "bad order" freight cars (which we always seem to
have) and then populating the other track with cars up on
jacks, welding equipment, etc -- cars as scenery.

No one seems to like the idea.

Tim O'Connor

Maybe that's how to overcome the Better Homes & Gardens effect - put a line of idle gons or box cars on the far track, or at the end of a few sidings. They wouldn't be a factor in an operating session so presumably wouldn't impose themselves on your conscienceness. They'd just be there, as scenery, "present but not voting".

Just some thoughts of a wandering mind.

Tom Madden


Re: Rolling stock as scenery

jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

I have designed for long sidings and fewer turnouts, some B&O stored boxcars at the end of several sidings is part of the plan. Also some on the rip track being cleaned and repaired.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@...> wrote:


<Snip>



Maybe that's how to overcome the Better Homes & Gardens effect - put a line of idle gons or box cars on the far track, or at the end of a few sidings. They wouldn't be a factor in an operating session so presumably wouldn't impose themselves on your conscienceness. They'd just be there, as scenery, "present but not voting".

Just some thoughts of a wandering mind.

Tom Madden


Rolling stock as scenery

Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Railroads often stored bad order cars in yards in this era. Many
roads had about a 5% bad order rate but some (e.g. PRR) had much
higher rates because of a surplus of cars, so there was no hurry
to repair everything... And of course, a photographer would more
likely shoot the storage tracks rather than the classification
tracks, as storage tracks tend to be more accessible.
Finally, after dozens of posts, a couple of folks mention stored cars. When Jim lamented the Better Homes & Gardens look of his layout, I thought he meant the lack of weeds. That is, when he looks at his layout, every piece of rolling stock he sees has a history and purpose, and he is very much aware of all of it. No "weeds" - the "present but not voting" cars in the background.

Real railroad scenes aren't like that. When we look at a Delano photo a few cars catch our attention at first, then more and more will if we take the time to study. But there's no instant recognition of all the cars in a shot. I'm not sure there's any way around this considering that we populate our layouts with rolling stock we've personally chosen, but maybe there is in the way we operate. I don't have a layout but occasionally operate on the layouts of friends. It's always bothered me that, at the end of a session, every piece of rolling stock on the layout has been dealt with. Even cars that are spotted where they were when the evening started had to be moved at some point. No allowance for stored cars on the visible portion of the layout.

In a late-night bull session many years ago, the late Terry Metcalfe got to musing about PFE's reefer fleet in the mid- to late-1950s. Many wood reefers were still on the roster, but few ever showed up in contemporary photos. Terry decided they were all stored on sidings in California's Central Valley, waiting for the call that never came. Whether it's seasonal traffic, elderly but still serviceable cars, or hard economic times, railroads always have cars to store somewhere. Somewhere out of the way, where they don't have to be moved in the normal course of operations. Logic (and per diem) say these would be home road cars.

Maybe that's how to overcome the Better Homes & Gardens effect - put a line of idle gons or box cars on the far track, or at the end of a few sidings. They wouldn't be a factor in an operating session so presumably wouldn't impose themselves on your conscienceness. They'd just be there, as scenery, "present but not voting".

Just some thoughts of a wandering mind.

Tom Madden


Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

Brian,

The NWHS has numerous drawings of various trucks in its archive collection. N&W assigned a class to each truck; however, most of the truck drawings are traced from the original vendor drawings.

You can check out what is in the database at www.nwhs.org and click on search the archives. Copies of the drawings are available for purchase.

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----
From: Brian Chapman
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, June 06, 2009 2:41 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?





> The chapter on trucks in Bob Karig's book on Coal Cars, published by the University of Chicago Press, is an indispensable guide to the development of truck technology. <

Richard,

A search of three major used book databases failed to discover a copy of this book for sale. However, I did discover new copies of two Karig books for sale via the U. of Chicago publications Web site. There, I found that the chapter on freight car trucks in the "Coal Cars" book runs to 48 pages.

My goal is to draw a number of transition-era trucks in 3D. May I ask you if Karig's book provides drawings, straight-on photos or other information about trucks I would find useful to achieve my goal?

Thanks much,

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

----------------------

Martin Robert Karig III
Coal Cars
The First Three Hundred Years
400 pages, 608 halftones 8-1/2 x 11
Cloth $75.00

Martin Robert Karig III
Hard Coal and Coal Cars
Hauling Anthracite on the New York, Ontario & Western Railway
220 pages, 200 halftones 8-1/2 x 11 © 2006
Cloth $55.00





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

Paul Lyons
 

Brian,

Not sure where you are looking, Abe's used books had six or so new copies for sale yesterday, when I did the seach.

Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@mchsi.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, 6 Jun 2009 11:41 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?








The chapter on trucks in Bob Karig's book on Coal Cars, published by the University of Chicago Press, is an indispensable guide to the development of truck technology. <
Richard,

A search of three major used book databases failed to discover a copy of this book for sale. However, I did discover new copies of two Karig books for sale via the U. of Chicago publications Web site. There, I found that the chapter on freight car trucks in the "Coal Cars" book runs to 48 pages.

My goal is to draw a number of transition-era trucks in 3D. May I ask you if Karig's book provides drawings, straight-on photos or other information about trucks I would find useful to achieve my goal?

Thanks much,

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

----------------------

Martin Robert Karig III
Coal Cars
The First Three Hundred Years
400 pages, 608 halftones 8-1/2 x 11
Cloth $75.00

Martin Robert Karig III
Hard Coal and Coal Cars
Hauling Anthracite on the New York, Ontario & Western Railway
220 pages, 200 halftones 8-1/2 x 11 © 2006
Cloth $55.00








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Freight car trucks - bibliograph?

Brian Chapman <cornbeltroute@...>
 

The chapter on trucks in Bob Karig's book on Coal Cars, published by the University of Chicago Press, is an indispensable guide to the development of truck technology. <
Richard,

A search of three major used book databases failed to discover a copy of this book for sale. However, I did discover new copies of two Karig books for sale via the U. of Chicago publications Web site. There, I found that the chapter on freight car trucks in the "Coal Cars" book runs to 48 pages.

My goal is to draw a number of transition-era trucks in 3D. May I ask you if Karig's book provides drawings, straight-on photos or other information about trucks I would find useful to achieve my goal?

Thanks much,

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

----------------------

Martin Robert Karig III
Coal Cars
The First Three Hundred Years
400 pages, 608 halftones 8-1/2 x 11
Cloth $75.00

Martin Robert Karig III
Hard Coal and Coal Cars
Hauling Anthracite on the New York, Ontario & Western Railway
220 pages, 200 halftones 8-1/2 x 11 © 2006
Cloth $55.00


Summary, Likeability bias problem

James Mischke <jmischke@...>
 

Thank you all for your clarifying input and suggestions.


My thinking as evolved to thus:

- The main problem with a likeability bias .... a Better Homes
and Gardens contrived look ..... seems to be with boxcar
selection. Even in boxcar red days, prototype boxcars were big,
colorful, and eye catching. We all have our favorites. Many
prototypes are virtually rolling billboards for their owners.
Some diverse weathering will help reduce their eyecatching
nature. Some ubiquitous PRR boxcars will tone it down further.

- My hopper fleet and its mix are driven by types, lettering,
and roadnames of the era and locale. For an effective era
look, I need to have this mix whether I like them or not. (I
like them all anyway, but it is not a selection factor). Hoppers
are also mainly black and grubby.

- Tank cars and flat cars are rather innocuous. Black and
red/brown, respectively, with plain lettering predominate. Most
do not draw any attention to themselves.

- Reefers are colorful, yet with B&O's inferior competitive
position in refrigerated foodstuffs, and the local nature of the
Pittsburgh market, I can have several around and they don't
dominate any scene, making their way one by one to the cold warehouse.

- Here is the biggest point: In trains and yards, these car
types are all mixed up and the boxcars spread out a bit amongst
the others, leading to a more realistic uncontrived look. In
fact, this likeability bias first became apparent in my
temporary yard, full of boxcars, which have been my most recent projects.



One last thought. Remember when we were all constrained by the
Athearn blue box road names? My fleet and all my friends' were
instantly recognizable as drawn from this available supply. The
Athearn Boxcar Bias. As more products became available, I vowed
to eventually replace all the Athearn blue box freight cars in
my fleet. Long accomplished, I thought I had left unintended
and recognizable biases behind, but I had not.


Thank you for helping me talk this through. I hope there was
something useful in this discussion to ponder for each of you.


Re: Freight car distribution

Tim O'Connor
 

Railroads often stored bad order cars in yards in this era. Many
roads had about a 5% bad order rate but some (e.g. PRR) had much
higher rates because of a surplus of cars, so there was no hurry
to repair everything... And of course, a photographer would more
likely shoot the storage tracks rather than the classification
tracks, as storage tracks tend to be more accessible.

Tim O'Connor

Seems to me that yards are somewhat of an anomoly compared to the trains themselves. Yards are intended to capture home road cars, possibly for forwarding to a central location, possibly for a seasonal rush, etc. Wouldn't yards, by their very nature, deviate from what was in trains with the occasional train with a large number of home road cars being periodic rather than random?

Regards,
Robert Hume


Re: Freight car distribution

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Robert--

Very respectfully, to say that yards are intended to capture home road cars is a simplification of what yards are used for. They have been abused to store and hoard cars. Which is why so many Railboxes were built in the 1970's, as roads hoarded cars for their use rather than supplying their own. The PRR was a de facto supplier of cars to the US rail system in the era of STMFC. If the Pennsy's fleet of 191,639 STMFC's were stored in PRR yards in January, 1953, it's likely that next to nothing would have moved on that road, as that railroad would have had almost every yard full of cars.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rashputin1" <rashputin@...> wrote:

Seems to me that yards are somewhat of an anomoly compared to the trains themselves. Yards are intended to capture home road cars, possibly for forwarding to a central location, possibly for a seasonal rush, etc. Wouldn't yards, by their very nature, deviate from what was in trains with the occasional train with a large number of home road cars being periodic rather than random?

Regards,

Robert Hume


Re: Freight car distribution

rashputin1 <rashputin@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

We've been down this road too -- most people take photos of
stuff they happen to like, or that catches their interest.
Almost no one took photos (and expended film) in order to
document "typical" stuff. Ergo: photos are not admissible
as evidence of anything other than what is depicted in them.

By the way, being an GN and NP fan, I've seen many photos
on each railroad where virtually no home road cars can be
seen. Including the infamous NP Montana branch line train
with a bunch of PRR empties headed to a grain elevator...

Tim O'

It doesn't take a long time looking at photos, for example, of Northern Pacific or Great Northern freight trains and yards to see that at least on the days the pictures were taken, home road equipment often dominated, but the stats say otherwise. Go figure. Glad you are having fun with all this, Mike.

John Stokes
Bellevue, WA

Seems to me that yards are somewhat of an anomoly compared to the trains themselves. Yards are intended to capture home road cars, possibly for forwarding to a central location, possibly for a seasonal rush, etc. Wouldn't yards, by their very nature, deviate from what was in trains with the occasional train with a large number of home road cars being periodic rather than random?

Regards,

Robert Hume


Re: likeability bias in model freight car selection

rashputin1 <rashputin@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rwitt_2000" <rwitt_2000@...> wrote:


Jerry Glow wrote:

IMHO you need to study your interchange partners and patterns. It is
less likely that a nearby road's cars would be on yours than a distant
one. Not impossible but to me, less likely. Of course we all are PRR
modelers regardless of what we call our railroad <G> but in my case
that
is VERY true as PRR interchanged with my modeled MP mainly in St Louis
and many cars were subject of Dick Kulbs (and others') photos in
Texas.

I agree with Jerry although I would add that its the customers that
determine the freight car traffic patterns.

In each area industries determine the shipping patterns. As a counter
to
Jerry's assumption that interchange is more likely with "distant"
railroads I provide the following example. In Madison Wisconsin, the
Milwaukee Road served the University heating plant, but the coal
contract was with mines in southern Illinois. So the coal came via the
Illinois Central usually in their hoppers. The IC interchanged with
the
Milwaukee Road. The MILW took the hoppers, spotted them at the
unloading
facility in the coal storage yard for the heating plant. They were
unloaded and returned empty to the IC. All this activity occurred
within
an area of one square city block.

Bob Witt


I started out planning to use the mix Bruce Chubb recommended in
hisbook, "How to Operate your model railroad", then modifying it to
reflect large shippers and industries in the area I'm modeling. I have
managed to stick pretty close to it now that I've been buying the cars I
need. It's an interesting article but the basic premise is
straightforward. Based on talking yardmasters,Jim Hediger found that
the consensus was the following:


Home Road 50%
Primary Connections 25%
Secondary Connections 15%
Others roads and private owners 10%



Box Cars 43%
Flat Cars 4%
Stock Cars 3%
Gondola 12%
Hopper 32%
Covered Hopper 2%
Tank 1%
Refrigerator 3%


(the above car types are the result of averaging the six railroads
usedas examples in the article)


I got the majority of my fleet (about 2/3 of the cars I planned for)
based on the above ratios, then got the balance based on the large
shippers and receivers I plan along with the major connections involved
in serving them. I have a "thing" for short Covered Hoppers so
it was sometimes tough to stick to the plan, but I just remembered that
I had the other third of the fleet to plan another way and was able to
stick with it. Once I started adding hoppers, I ended up with closer to
50% of my roster based on the above and 50% based on the large
industries I serve.


I weather by taking one car of the appropriate type for each of the
online and modeled industries on my layout, then weathering that car as
I think it would be if that were the only shipper/recipient the car ever
serviced. I repeat that with a second and sometimes a third car for
that industry, each with a different roadname. From that pair or trio
per industry, I go to groups of three or five cars of a type and weather
each group based on one ofsix route profiles I made up that vary in
degrees of "grubby". That leaves the cars that always pass through such
as coal drags and reefer expresses, etc. I weather those blocks of cars
based on what their real world route would have been, then looking over
the route to determine what level of grubby seems appropriate. Things
from the Southwest have a whole different set of weathering colors and
degree of weathering than do cars from industrial areas in the East or
Midwest, for example.


This ended up with a lot of cars with the same road name but very
different weathering and blocks of cars that look like they all went
through the same type ofweathering. My reefers are something of an
exception since I figure they're washed or repainted a good bit more
often than other cars. I based that on what I recall as a child when
there was never a problem telling if a white reefer was white, grey, or
some off white color which means they were washed or painted often. The
same is true of PFE cars I have although they're usually in blocks of
the same degree of weathering, some blocks very clean, some mildly
grubby. (I finally got a couple of books on reefers, and the approach I
was using seems fine based on what the real world reefer companies were
doing back then.) One thing, though, I found that weathering all the
trucks at least moderately, no matter what degree of weathering the car
has, seemed to make everything look better when a train rolls past or
when the cars are among many others in a yard. Setting large groups of
cars out in a temporary yard (rows of straight track on a 4x6) the mix
looks pretty realistic to me. I know the times are a lot different, but
the local Southern yard has pretty much the same look inspite of there
being much different car types.



I think using some basic formula is the best way to start, but not
really the way to build your entire fleet. You may want to do 50% of
your cars to a formula rather than two-thirds if you have some special
types of cars you really like, but you'd still have a large percentage
of your fleet looking like what was found to be areasonable mix based on
interviewing folks in the real world.





Regards,

Robert Hume

106721 - 106740 of 188713