Date   

Re: Three bay PS2 covered hoppers

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Mont, Schuyler and Tim,

The Western Pacific and subsidiary Sacramento Northern owned several lots of these and similar cars, first purchased in 1958. They probably carried many things, among them rice. Their most unusual load of which I know was whole walnuts.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Mont Switzer wrote:

SGL,
The Monon was an early user of these cars (1953) most of which made it all the way to the L&N merger in 1971. They are known to have handled grain, flour, soy bean meal and late in life, sand. They seemed to stay close to the home road and were dedicated to the product they were currently hauling.
The Athearn model released a couple of years ago is 100%correctct for the Monon cars decorated in boxcar red with white lettering. Later cars were painted gray with black lettering.
Mont Switzer


--- On Fri, 6/26/09, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
Subject: Re:[STMFC] Three bay PS2 covered hoppers
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, June 26, 2009, 6:58 AM

dry, bulk cargo

At 6/26/2009 01:10 AM Friday, you wrote:

In the most broad sense, what would these cars be found carrying?
SGL



















Re: Three bay PS2 covered hoppers

Mont Switzer <mhts_switzerm@...>
 

SGL,
 
The Monon was an early user of these cars (1953) most of which made it all the way to the L&N merger in 1971.  They are known to have handled grain, flour, soy bean meal and late in life, sand.  They seemed to stay close to the home road and were dedicated to the product they were currently hauling.
 
The Athearn model released a couple of years ago is 100%correctct for the Monon cars decorated in boxcar red with white lettering.  Later cars were painted gray with black lettering.
 
Mont Switzer

--- On Fri, 6/26/09, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
Subject: Re:[STMFC] Three bay PS2 covered hoppers
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, June 26, 2009, 6:58 AM









dry, bulk cargo

At 6/26/2009 01:10 AM Friday, you wrote:
In the most broad sense, what would these cars be found carrying?
SGL


Re: Three bay PS2 covered hoppers

Tim O'Connor
 

dry, bulk cargo

At 6/26/2009 01:10 AM Friday, you wrote:
In the most broad sense, what would these cars be found carrying?
SGL


Brian Carlson contact

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Brian

Can you contact me off list at gamlenz@ihug.co.nz, please. I've been trying to e-mail you about Packers Car Line but my messages won't go through.

Thanks

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


Re: Grand Trunk 16205

Ian Cranstone
 

James, GT 16205 is a Pullman product built in July 1907 as part of the 15250-16499 series of 36' boxcars. Following the amalgamation of the Grand Trunk into the Canadian National system in 1923, this particular car was assigned CN 337271, with the last car being retired and/or renumbered during the 1936-38 time period.

Although these cars were similar dimensionally to Fowlers, they predated them by several years, and were actually a double-sheathed all-wood design (I have a photo of CN 337408) -- although steel centre sills would have been added in the 1920s if they weren't built with them. Although one example remained on the roster as late as 1956, their number began to decline in the early 1930s as CN acquired a large fleet of 40' single-sheathed cars. I suspect, but don't know for sure, that a number of these cars found their way into service as bunk cars during this period, as CN preferred the double-sheathed wood cars for this purpose.

Ian Cranstone
Osgoode, Ontario, Canada
lamontc@nakina.net
http://freightcars.nakina.net
http://siberians.nakina.net

On 25-Jun-09, at 9:43 PM, James McDonald wrote:



Hello all,

A friend is trying to date a photo from a picture postcard. He
suspects the photo on it dates from the early 1900's but there is no
date, photographer's mark, or other identifying information on the
reverse of the postcard. However, on the card in one area can be seen
the A end of a freight car (box or stock is unclear) lettered "GRAND
TRUNK 16205".

He cropped and enlarged that section of the photo and with his
permission I've uploaded it to the group files (presently waiting on
moderator approval) in the album "Grand Trunk 16205". I'm hoping you
can help me identify the car.

The end seems to be quite similar to Fowler cars. Judging by the lack
of sill steps I suspect the photo must be taken before 1910. However,
I'm unable to get closer to establishing a date for the photo than
that on my own.

Are there among us any with a deep knowledge of Grand Trunk rolling
stock? It'd be nice to be able to wrap some dates around the photo,
but I'd also be curious how long this car (or its brethren) was in
service.

Any info you can provide would be much appreciated.

All the best,

James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD


Three bay PS2 covered hoppers

Schuyler Larrabee
 

In the most broad sense, what would these cars be found carrying?

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!






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Cleanout or washout track for reefers a Question

Neville <rossiters@...>
 

Hello Everyone.
I am a new member here , my name is Neville Rossiter I reside in West Australia and I have a O Scale Railroad called the Bay Ridge Harbor Rail Road (BRHRR) and for my first post I would like to ask a question.
I use a lot of reefers on my Railroad and I need to build a Cleaning area.
I run Veg and Fruit in Reefers to produce sidings then transfer them to an Ice Cream Factory Complex where they are iced and then loaded with Ice Cream products to be shipped out.
I have been told the reefers should be cleaned before icing and being loaded with Ice Cream products so I have laid two tracks and built a platform for a cleaning area.
My Question is:

What other details do I need for the cleaning area?

I have two reefer books but can find no photos of cleaning tracks.
Can someone help.
Thanks.
Neville.


Grand Trunk 16205

James McDonald
 

Hello all,

A friend is trying to date a photo from a picture postcard. He suspects the photo on it dates from the early 1900's but there is no date, photographer's mark, or other identifying information on the reverse of the postcard. However, on the card in one area can be seen the A end of a freight car (box or stock is unclear) lettered "GRAND TRUNK 16205".

He cropped and enlarged that section of the photo and with his permission I've uploaded it to the group files (presently waiting on moderator approval) in the album "Grand Trunk 16205". I'm hoping you can help me identify the car.

The end seems to be quite similar to Fowler cars. Judging by the lack of sill steps I suspect the photo must be taken before 1910. However, I'm unable to get closer to establishing a date for the photo than that on my own.

Are there among us any with a deep knowledge of Grand Trunk rolling stock? It'd be nice to be able to wrap some dates around the photo, but I'd also be curious how long this car (or its brethren) was in service.

Any info you can provide would be much appreciated.

All the best,

James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD


Re: Freight car maintenance

David North <davenorth@...>
 

In the past I would carefully file down one of the Athearn collars
attempting to get one truck "rock free" without it binding, to create a
three point suspension.

This of course didn't work for MDC type bolsters, and I don't like self
tappers due to the styrene they displace, which distorts the face of the
bolster.

Over the last couple of years I've been using 2-56 nylon screws to hold my
trucks on.

On Athearn cars, I reduce the height of the collar so a screw will bind the
truck before bottoming out on the collar.

I tap the hole 8BA and run the nylon screw into the hole.

Whether it is the different thread form (47.5 v 60), the nylon material or a
little parting line flash I'm not sure, but using the nylon 2-56 screw has
the same effect as using a nylok nut.

I ease the screw in, until I'm happy with the amount of "truck rock" and the
screw stays where I've adjusted it.

And the nylon screws work perfectly on IM and MDC etc type bolsters without
the collar.

An added bonus is that the screws I use have a slightly larger head than a
pan head screw.

I buy them from Micro Fasteners

http://www.microfasteners.com/catalog/products/NYLNBPP.cfm

Disclaimer: I have no connection with them other than as a satisfied
customer

Cheers

Dave North


Re: Color of the PRR X31 Boxcar at Cajon Pass

Tim O'Connor
 

Bob

PRR went to a darker color, more like Conrail alkyd brown,
when it adopted the shadow keystone scheme. I seem to recall
many emails to this effect.

At 6/25/2009 03:38 PM Thursday, you wrote:
Does any one wish to comments about the color of the PRR X31 boxcar also
captured in this sequence of photos from Cajon Pass.

http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/cp/cajon_64.html

It is less like the bright oxide red that some freight car people
describe. The colors do not appear to be shifted in these reproductions.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: Color of the PRR X31 Boxcar at Cajon Pass

rwitt_2000
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


On Jun 25, 2009, at 2:38 PM, rwitt_2000 wrote:

Does any one wish to comments about the color of the PRR X31 boxcar
also
captured in this sequence of photos from Cajon Pass.

http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/cp/cajon_64.html
<http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/cp/cajon_64.html>

It is less like the bright oxide red that some freight car people
describe. The colors do not appear to be shifted in these
reproductions.

Bob Witt
Bruce Smith replied:

Bob,

PRR's FCC (freight car color) varied depending on the era. The car
shown is in the shadow keystone scheme, which would have been a more
red-brown, less orange color than a car in the ball/circle keystone
scheme. In addition, the car shown has significant weathering of the
body paint, which appears to be an all-over sooty brown, also
darkening the apparent color of the paint. So to sum it up, it looks
like a nicely weathered X31A, the color seems to be accurately
captured (not shifted), but it should not be misconstrued to
represent anything like the original color.

Bruce,

Thank you for your reply. Yes, it is a nicely weathered X31A. This is
the color and appearance of PRR boxcars I remember from my days spent in
freight yards in the 1960's. I don't recall observing a PRR boxcar in
the ball/circle keystone P&L scheme.

Regards,

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: Color of the PRR X31 Boxcar at Cajon Pass

Bruce Smith
 

On Jun 25, 2009, at 2:38 PM, rwitt_2000 wrote:

Does any one wish to comments about the color of the PRR X31 boxcar also
captured in this sequence of photos from Cajon Pass.

http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/cp/cajon_64.html
<http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/cp/cajon_64.html>

It is less like the bright oxide red that some freight car people
describe. The colors do not appear to be shifted in these reproductions.

Bob Witt
Bob,

PRR's FCC (freight car color) varied depending on the era. The car shown is in the shadow keystone scheme, which would have been a more red-brown, less orange color than a car in the ball/circle keystone scheme. In addition, the car shown has significant weathering of the body paint, which appears to be an all-over sooty brown, also darkening the apparent color of the paint. So to sum it up, it looks like a nicely weathered X31A, the color seems to be accurately captured (not shifted), but it should not be misconstrued to represent anything like the original color.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/index.pl/bruce_f._smith2

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
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Color of the PRR X31 Boxcar at Cajon Pass

rwitt_2000
 

Does any one wish to comments about the color of the PRR X31 boxcar also
captured in this sequence of photos from Cajon Pass.

http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/cp/cajon_64.html
<http://www.geocities.com/jim_lancaster.geo/cp/cajon_64.html>

It is less like the bright oxide red that some freight car people
describe. The colors do not appear to be shifted in these reproductions.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Re: Hal Carstens this morning

dh30973
 

Here is the offical Obituary

http://obit.smithmccrackenfuneralhome.com/obit-683315


Dave Hussey
Cannon and Company


Re: Freight car maintenance

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Shoulder or not, I use the blue thread locker (Loctite 242 or similar) to secure kingpin screws. This stuff is made so that you can still back the screw out when you have to. Loctite also has a purple formula, no. 222MS, which is rated at "low strength" (242 is "medium"), but I haven't tried it.

So long,

Andy

Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@mrmag.com
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142


Re: Freight car maintenance

Charles Morrill
 

Regarding truck mounting screws coming loose --- where I don't have the sleeve or shoulder to tighten the screw against, I've found a small drop of white glue in the hole works very well. And it is still easy to remove the screw when necessary.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----

Regarding the problem of truck mounting screws removing themselves: I am a big fan of what I call the "Athearn" truck mounting system, where there is a sleeve for the mounting screw to snug up to (sorry about the preposition). On the many models that don't provide such a sleeve, I make my own by cutting off the sleeve on a typical Kadee coupler box. That solution will not last, as my fantasy of using the Sargent couplers may come about.

With the "Athearn" approach, I have NEVER had a screw back out.

I do not understand why people would think a screw would just sort of stay in a hole because it would be a nice idea. There's a reason they're called "screws", after all.

Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Caboose Markers

Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@...>
 

I believe these are one in the same as the Tomar lights. Utah Pacific was bought some time ago by Tomar.
Regards,
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: "Allen Cain" <allencain@tampabay.rr.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: <jimbetz@jimbetz.com>
Sent: Wednesday, June 24, 2009 11:15 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re:Caboose Markers


Has anyone tried the Utah Pacific 755-64 caboose markers that are pre-wired
with lights? The lenses are already in place and they come in either
red/green or red/yellow.



Here is the link to the Walthers product page:



http://walthers.com/exec/productinfo/755-64



Allen Cain






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: interesting NYC box at Cajon Pass

Tim O'Connor
 

yes, always

At 6/25/2009 12:02 AM Thursday, you wrote:
Are you saying there ARE DASHES in NYC lot numbers?

:-)

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: interesting NYC box at Cajon Pass

al_brown03
 

Are you saying there ARE DASHES in NYC lot numbers?

:-)

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

At 6/24/2009 09:41 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Tim O'Connor wrote:
Say WHAT? Cars built in 1930 had been built in the 1940's?? Does
anyone proofread these books?
Tiny nit, Tim: what you're calling for is fact checking, not proof
reading.

Tony Thompson
In that case, a proofreader ought to know that NYC lots were
NNN-X (number-type) and never NNN (no class) or NNNX (no dash)

Tim


Re: interesting NYC box at Cajon Pass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Tim, there are two kinds of proofreaders. One is an English major looking to supplement the income
he (or she) can otherwise make ;^) by proofing the English, the sentence structure, and the
punctuation in copy. There is another kind, which are often called proofreaders, but are actually
better termed fact checkers. I serve the ELHS as both. I am a fairly decent writer, and get most
punctuation right. But I am also (by now) fairly knowledgeable about the ERIE, DL&W (less so) and
the EL. So, when the proof copies of The Diamond come from the editor, to me and a few others, I
read it twice. First to kill off the typos and punctuation issues, because they drive me crazy.
Second to really think about what the author has written. Is it right? Are the captions somewhere
near correct and complete? Has he left out half the story?

Not long ago, we had an article which was correctly written in terms of spelling and punctuation.
And it was full of factual information that checked out. But it was so badly written in terms of
style and interest it was horrible, deadly and boring. I substantially rewrote the article under
deadline so that it had some punch and pacing to it. Fortunately for this list, it also contained a
number of photographs and information about freight cars and steam locomotives. *whew* Close call
there!

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor

I disagree Professor. If someone TYPES 123B instead of 123-B
then it's a typo.

And how could a proofreader possibly detect a transposition
of 123-B into 132-B??

IMO it's a railroad FACT book, so the proofreader's knowledge
has to include more than what's in Webster's. Call it what you
want, I call that proofreading.

Tim O'Connor wrote:
In that case, a proofreader ought to know that NYC lots were NNN-X
(number-type) and never NNN (no class) or NNNX (no dash)
Nope. They are looking for spelling, grammar errors, typos of
various kinds, transpositions, etc. They will not and do not check
facts such as you mention, as those require specialized knowledge.
They will indeed check well-known facts, such as the year in which WW
I ended, etc.

Tony Thompson




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