Date   

Re: Eastern Car Works PRR F38 Flat Car - Experiences?

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Kurt,

        I built mine with the following modifications>> replace trucks with
Athearn buckeye type, round off corner to clear the ends. Brake gear
is attached to the trucks. The mounting lug needs to be carefully centered
under the floor, prwedrilled for 2-56 screw. It can be done, however, it
is a royal PITA

Fred Freitas >>>>>who will not build another one.




________________________________
From: Bruce Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 8:11:38 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Eastern Car Works PRR F38 Flat Car - Experiences?

 
On Wed, July 15, 2009 6:48 pm, Kurt Laughlin wrote:
Has anyone built one of these? Any experiences they'd like to pass on?
Yeah, sell the ECW kit and buy the Rail Classics brass model (if you can
find it) <VBG>.

Seriously, the ECW F38 is pretty rare and I have heard of only a few
people building it. I have never seen an assembled one. I have heard
that typical of ECW kits, the details are relatively coarse and the fit is
poor. You'll certainly be lucky if the parts don't resemble a roller
coaster! If you do build it, consider writing it up for TKM!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Truck patent and model available

David North <davenorth@...>
 

On the plus side, you'd have less wheel wear since there wouldn't be any due
to "differential slippage". No wheel squeal either. Sad.
Edward Sutorik



I understand that the tread of a railroad wheel is tapered so that as it
moves left and right across the railhead its rolling circumference changes,
thereby providing a "differential action"

through curves with its mate at the other end of the axle. How effective is
this process in reducing wheel and rail wear?

Cheers

Dave North


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
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File : /gn wp station log bieber /bieber-1947-oct-dec-000-100
Uploaded by : allen_282 <allen_282@yahoo.com>
Description : Station Log @ Bieber CA 1947 Oct - Dec 000 and 001

You can access this file at the URL:
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To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
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Regards,

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Re: Express boxcars/troop sleeper trucks

Tim O'Connor
 

AFC's were only banned from interchange -- they remained in use
for many years on many railroads. All of the pictures I have of
C&O troop cars have AFC's but these are later shots showing the
cars all in company MofW service.

Tim O'Connor

At 7/15/2009 09:54 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
I need help on replacement trucks for the Allied Full Cushions that come on the Walthers Troop Sleeper rebuilds.

I model 8-28-57. I found a picture of the NYC's express box in RP CYC #5 retrucked with ASF A-3 ride control trucks. I put sa pair of Katos on my NYC car and it looks great. I need to find out if this same truck went on the CB&Q and C&O troop sleeper/express box conversions.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL


Re: ARCHER rivets on Factory Painted Boxcars

James Eckman
 

If you have to manually paint them, I'd be tempted to make a template and paint them with a slightly thick paint. I have painted on details with acrylics, painful!

Jim


Express boxcars/troop sleeper trucks

Bill McCoy
 

I need help on replacement trucks for the Allied Full Cushions that come on the Walthers Troop Sleeper rebuilds.

I model 8-28-57. I found a picture of the NYC's express box in RP CYC #5 retrucked with ASF A-3 ride control trucks. I put sa pair of Katos on my NYC car and it looks great. I need to find out if this same truck went on the CB&Q and C&O troop sleeper/express box conversions.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL


Express boxcars/troop sleeper trucks

Bill McCoy
 

I need help on replacement trucks for the Allied Full Cushions that come on the Walthers Troop Sleeper rebuilds.

I model 8-28-57. I found a picture of the NYC's express box in RP CYC #5 retrucked with ASF A-3 ride control trucks. I put sa pair of Katos on my NYC car and it looks great. I need to find out if this same truck went on the CB&Q and C&O troop sleeper/express box conversions.

Thanks in advance for any help you can give me.

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL


Re: ARCHER rivets on Factory Painted Boxcars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dave Hussey wrote:
Thanks, that is great. What I noticed from their announcement was they don't tell you what the spacing is. You indicated it is double, but double of what. I would assume that if you wanted to build a complete car side you need another sheet of rivets for the seam. Thus my question, what sheet does it pair with?
To tell the truth, I didn't think of it from that perspective, but from the idea of adding the ACR rivets to an existing car body--of which we have a bunch in HO which are suitable--to make the conversion. Here's a procedure: put down one strip of ACR, and when dry, add a second strip spaced halfway between <g>.
The car drawings show seam rivets at a 2.5-inch spacing, ACR at 5 inches.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Eastern Car Works PRR F38 Flat Car - Experiences?

Bruce Smith
 

On Wed, July 15, 2009 6:48 pm, Kurt Laughlin wrote:
Has anyone built one of these? Any experiences they'd like to pass on?
Yeah, sell the ECW kit and buy the Rail Classics brass model (if you can
find it) <VBG>.

Seriously, the ECW F38 is pretty rare and I have heard of only a few
people building it. I have never seen an assembled one. I have heard
that typical of ECW kits, the details are relatively coarse and the fit is
poor. You'll certainly be lucky if the parts don't resemble a roller
coaster! If you do build it, consider writing it up for TKM!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: ARCHER rivets on Factory Painted Boxcars

dh30973
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
Tony

Thanks, that is great. What I noticed from their announcement was they don't tell you what the spacing is. You indicated it is double, but double of what. I would assume that if you wanted to build a complete car side you need another sheet of rivets for the seam. Thus my question, what sheet does it pair with?

Dave Hussey


Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, where did you measure the A.C.R. rivet spacing? (What
prototype.) Is it correct as-is for the SP B-50-24? (Overnight box
car)
Both the UP and SP cars with ACR sides had rivets in the
panel center were exactly twice the spacing of the seam rivets. That's
what the Archer sheet has. A quick look at some Cyc photos suggests
that other ACR cars were at least close to that proportion. If anyone
has different info, speak up and maybe Archer will do another set.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Eastern Car Works PRR F38 Flat Car - Experiences?

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Has anyone built one of these? Any experiences they'd like to pass on?

Thx,
KL


Re: Truck patent and model available

water.kresse@...
 

I'm beginnig to believe this patent might have motivated John A. Pilcher (N&W Mech Engr) for his design for the GS 100-ton gon 6-wheel trucks.  The "X" twisting bolster and the side-bearing on the side frame are somewhat similar to those in the N&W's truck design. 



Image 8-bearings vs. 4 bearings.  How do you check out and oil those inside bearings at night?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "Frederick Freitas" <prrinvt@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 3:04:29 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Truck patent and model available

Al,

        You are right, that is the ugliest truck ever. If it had to be on a model
I would change it out in nano-second. What a nightmare that would have
been for the car shops.

Fred Freitas




________________________________
From: "water.kresse@comcast.net" <water.kresse@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 2:46:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Truck patent and model available







Note on Google Patent Search, patent # 1128110 shows up subject-wise or key word search as "BAILWAY-CAB" . . . UGH!  Love it!!!

Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "cvsne" <mjmcguirk@comcast. net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com
Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2009 9:03:26 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Truck patent and model available

Currently up for auction on eBay (no, it's not my auction and I have no idea who's it is) is an unusual truck patent, along with the concept model.

You can see it here:

http://cgi.ebay. com/ws/eBayISAPI .dll?ViewItem& item=22045000493 8

Patent was applied for by Walther Chalfent of Brownsville, PA and the truck has an unusual double sideframe design (essentially, there are sideframes on both sides of the wheels.

From the side the sideframes look similar to some other later trucks,(at very first glance, from the side, the shape of the sideframe bears a slight resemblance to the Full Cushion trucks of later years).

Thought some of the truck historians on this list would be interested and perhaps some may know if anything ever came of this design.

Marty McGuirk

 






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Apology and Gypsum running boards

Ed Hawkins
 

On Jul 15, 2009, at 4:08 PM, Mark Morgan wrote:

First of all, my apologies to Mr. Hawkins. I forgot to use uppercase
in my previous email about the SCL B-9 class boxcar.

After posting the email I looked in a 1940 and 1957 Car Builders
Cyclopedias. No mention of us gypsum in the early one and two pages in
the 1957 issue.
I am surprised they had more than one pattern, always thought the had
holes!

Sincerely, Mark Morgan
Mark,
Apologies to me? I don't see any reason for them, but thanks. To help
with your question, the earliest CBC with any coverage on U.S.G.
running boards appeared in 1943 (one photo). The 1946 CBC had a U.S.G.
ad with good information about them on page 429. The expanded metal
design changed to rectangular grid occurred circa 1954, so U.S.G. parts
on SAL B-9 box cars were of the type shown in the 1946 CBC.

In case you aren't aware, my article in RP CYC Vol. 16 (shameless plug)
devoted nearly 50 pages on the subject of various running boards and
brake steps used in the steam era. Included is information about how &
when the different types of steel running boards & brake steps changed
from the late 1930s to 1960.

For modeling purposes in HO scale, unfortunately, there's not much in
the way of accurate U.S.G. expanded metal running boards to choose
from. I hope that one day that changes, but I can understand the
reasons why due to the complexity of the tooling that will be required.

As you may already know, it was the Morton running boards & brake steps
with the holes.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: ARCHER rivets on Factory Painted Boxcars

proto48er
 

Tim -

I was thinking in "O" scale terms! I have had to add a couple of rivets here and there, not whole strips of them. They are (currently) not properly spaced on the sheet for our size stuff.

In other words, I have cut some Archer rivets out individually and applied them in the appropriate place one at a time, not in strips. It seems this could be done easier on an already painted model by painting the decal sheet first, then cutting out the individual rivets... So far, I have only done this on a pair of unpainted cars (brass B&O USRA steel low-side gons where rivets were left off.)

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


It's probably easier to paint-match the rivets than to match
the background, but that's not a bad idea for some projects.
.....
Tim O'Connor


At 7/15/2009 04:29 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Andy -

That is a really interesting question! Why couldn't you paint the decal sheet BEFORE you cut out and apply the rivets. I have done this with clearcoat when old decals were too fragile to apply. The paint film would be no different than a clearcoat.

In fact Mr. Francis of Thinfilm Decals fame first started with a special paper that had two glues already applied to it (German made, as I recall). To make his decal film, he first sprayed a thin (!) coating of clear lacquer on the surface of the paper, waited until it was dry, then applied the lettering/artwork with screen printing.

Seems to me that you could paint the rivets BEFORE they were applied - no difference. Anyone want to try it??

A.T. Kott


Apology and Gypsum running boards

Mark
 

First of all, my apologies to Mr. Hawkins. I forgot to use uppercase in my previous email about the SCL B-9 class boxcar.

After posting the email I looked in a 1940 and 1957 Car Builders Cyclopedias. No mention of us gypsum in the early one and two pages in the 1957 issue.
I am surprised they had more than one pattern, always thought the had holes!

Sincerely, Mark Morgan


Re: Truck patent and model available

Charlie Vlk
 

Ed-
While I agree the inside bearings would have been a nightmare to service and replace, I don't believe there would be increased loadings on the
bearings.....at least as far as the total weight on the wheels is concerned.
There are twice the number of bearings on this truck as compared to a normal one.... so the loads on each bearing should be less.
The lateral forces, however would be greater as there is no axle to keep the wheels in gauge.... I'm not sure how that using the truck frame and bearings to keep gauge
would have worked...
Charlie Vlk
It looks like there would be some stunningly increased loadings on the axle bearings when this truck experienced lateral forces in curves. One could also wonder how often a railroad worker would crawl under a car to inspect/lubricate the solid inside bearings--"never" in 1920 and "never" in 1940. Hell, "never" in 2009.

On the plus side, you'd have less wheel wear since there wouldn't be any due to "differential slippage". No wheel squeal either. Sad.

Ed

Edward Sutorik

.

__,


Re: ARCHER rivets on Factory Painted Boxcars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, where did you measure the A.C.R. rivet spacing? (What prototype.) Is it correct as-is for the SP B-50-24? (Overnight box car)
Both the UP and SP cars with ACR sides had rivets in the panel center were exactly twice the spacing of the seam rivets. That's what the Archer sheet has. A quick look at some Cyc photos suggests that other ACR cars were at least close to that proportion. If anyone has different info, speak up and maybe Archer will do another set.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ARCHER rivets on Factory Painted Boxcars

Tim O'Connor
 

It's probably easier to paint-match the rivets than to match
the background, but that's not a bad idea for some projects.

Tony, where did you measure the A.C.R. rivet spacing? (What
prototype.) Is it correct as-is for the SP B-50-24? (Overnight
box car)

Tim O'Connor

At 7/15/2009 04:29 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Andy -

That is a really interesting question! Why couldn't you paint the decal sheet BEFORE you cut out and apply the rivets. I have done this with clearcoat when old decals were too fragile to apply. The paint film would be no different than a clearcoat.

In fact Mr. Francis of Thinfilm Decals fame first started with a special paper that had two glues already applied to it (German made, as I recall). To make his decal film, he first sprayed a thin (!) coating of clear lacquer on the surface of the paper, waited until it was dry, then applied the lettering/artwork with screen printing.

Seems to me that you could paint the rivets BEFORE they were applied - no difference. Anyone want to try it??

A.T. Kott


Re: Truck patent and model available

spsalso
 

It looks like there would be some stunningly increased loadings on the axle bearings when this truck experienced lateral forces in curves. One could also wonder how often a railroad worker would crawl under a car to inspect/lubricate the solid inside bearings--"never" in 1920 and "never" in 1940. Hell, "never" in 2009.

On the plus side, you'd have less wheel wear since there wouldn't be any due to "differential slippage". No wheel squeal either. Sad.

Ed

Edward Sutorik


GPEX 982 and 1021

Philip Marcus
 

Photos show a distinctive style of truck under these cars. Does anyone know the history of these trucks? Were these trucks used on anything other than GPEX express milk cars? Thanks in advance for your help.

Phil Marcus

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