Date   

DSS&A-SOO PS-1 box car

Tim O'Connor
 

This is an Ebay seller's slide taken in 2002! This car
was built in 1948, and it still has high ladders and a
running board...

http://www.first-out.com/ebay/0801332.jpg

Tim O'Connor


Cars for sale - Rock bottom prices

Bill McCoy
 

I'm getting rid of cars bought for projects that won't happen. Email me off line for a list.

Thanks,

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL
wpmccoy@comcast.net


For Sale items on eBay

Rob Sarberenyi <espeef5@...>
 

I have a variety of items listed on eBay, including several steam era
freight cars that may be of interest:

* Eastern Car Works (ECW) Pennsy F-38 class heavy duty flat car, but could
also be built for other roads (see photo with instructions). This was a
limited edition short run kit I was fortunate to order through my local
hobby shop years ago.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=350239497415

* Two (2) Eastern Car Works Northeast Style caboose kits with alternate ends
and roofwalks included
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=310161622395
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=350239497433

Proto 2000 Type 21 riveted 8,000 gallon tank car
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=350239927878


Please see my listings for other items
http://stores.shop.ebay.com/Espee-F-5

Thanks for looking!


Rob Sarberenyi


Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

Eric Hansmann
 

Mike Del Vecchio wrote:

As luck would have it, here's an ebay listing for the Branchline car, a classic 1937 10' IH car
modeled after that Whitaker collection photo of the 51300 that shows up often. The model has
black ends and roof, which the prototype did not. The word LACKAWANNA above the billboard
should be of a heavier line weight?and the reporting mark type looks like it was lifted from
the photo and its line wieght got thin in the horizontal areas.? Here's the link:?
http://cgi.ebay.com/Yardmaster-HO-Kits-AAR-40-DL-W-Boxcar-VERY-detailed_W0QQitemZ400066562376QQ
cmdZViewItemQQptZModel_RR_Trains?hash=item5d25d34948&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14

It's a shame as this was one of Lackawanna's most numerous boxcar models and every steam-era
modeler can justify some.? Granted, it's a Yardmaster series car, but it would have been less
expensive to make it correct. And what modeler wouldn't buy a common car that's correct?? This
model didn't separate this fool and his money.

=================================


Well, this fool bought a few Yardmaster kits at about $8 each and thought they were a pretty
good deal. The word on this list was that Branchline was striving for prototype paint and
lettering on their models - Blueprint and Yardmaster models. My DL&W effort can be seen at the
bottom of this page:
http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/73

I note there were five different lots of these cars built for the DL&W. There must have been at
least one car from one of these lots that were painted with black ends and roof and
photographed for posterity. Seems that a compamy like Branchline, that corrected a mold for a
wrong length box car, would be double-certain of their data early in production. Documentation
for the five DL&W lots of these cars can be found on this PDF:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/1937aarpdfmain.html

An additional four Branchline Yardmaster upgrades can be seen here:
http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/node/74

Eric



Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Starting over in a new house:
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/


Re: Thermice

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Al, thanks very much for digging into this topic so thoroughly. Much appreciated.

SGL




In Kaminski's book, p 17, is an ACF ad for a 7300-gallon ICC 105A500W tank car, for liquefied CO2
service. It's an
insulated "chemical" tank along the general lines of the old Athearn car but two-thirds as big,
with a pressure bonnet
instead of a dome, and a platform around the bonnet.

I haven't time to search the book exhaustively tonight; there may be other CO2 cars shown.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

As of the late forties, the most common source of gaseous CO2 was the combustion of coke.
(Nowadays, it's mostly
recovered from ammonia plants.) Upon compression the gas will liquefy and can be shipped that way,
at room
temperature but under pressure. If pressure is released, the CO2 becomes gaseous again.

At a dry-ice plant, CO2 gas is allowed to expand. Gases cool upon expansion, in this case enough
to solidify the
material as "snow". (This isn't efficient, and excess gas is recovered.) In a hydraulic press, the
"snow" is converted to
blocks. These must be kept cold, and are shipped in the familiar heavily-insulated reefers.

Above info from: R.M. Reed and N.C. Updegraff, in "Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology", 3rd
ed., eds. R.E. Kirk
and D.F. Othmer; Interscience: New York, 1949; vol. 3, pp 128-142.

So, a CO2 tank car would be used to ship the gas and liquid from someplace coke is burnt, to a
dry-ice plant. It would
need to withstand high pressure and I'd think it'd be insulated.

To be concluded when I get home and look in Kaminski's tank-car book.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "al_brown03" <abrown@> wrote:

Dry ice is solid CO2.

To be continued, after I look up manufacturing methods ...

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Schuyler Larrabee"
<schuyler.larrabee@> wrote:

At the North Shore Model Railroad Club, we have a Thermice tank car, which, we think,
carried carbon
dioxide. We'd like to make some realistic waybills for it.

One of the other guys has found a location of the company in Thorofare, NJ, near Paulsboro.
That
looks like a dry ice plant, not a place that would originate CO2.

Can anyone provide information on where those cars might have carried CO2 from and to ?

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!






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Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

MDelvec952
 

As luck would have it, here's an ebay listing for the Branchline car, a classic 1937 10' IH car modeled after that Whitaker collection photo of the 51300 that shows up often. The model has black ends and roof, which the prototype did not. The word LACKAWANNA above the billboard should be of a heavier line weight?and the reporting mark type looks like it was lifted from the photo and its line wieght got thin in the horizontal areas.? Here's the link:? http://cgi.ebay.com/Yardmaster-HO-Kits-AAR-40-DL-W-Boxcar-VERY-detailed_W0QQitemZ400066562376QQcmdZViewItemQQptZModel_RR_Trains?hash=item5d25d34948&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14



It's a shame as this was one of Lackawanna's most numerous boxcar models and every steam-era modeler can justify some.? Granted, it's a Yardmaster series car, but it would have been less expensive to make it correct. And what modeler wouldn't buy a common car that's correct?? This model didn't separate this fool and his money.



I did buy a bunch of the IMWX undec kits, and?nipped off?the poling pockets.? When our railroad club was restoring and painting DL&W caboose 896, which wore the very same Glidden No. 204 Standard Brown, I brought a few of the IMWX cars trackside and shot them in Dupont's Centari 5000 of that color. Yes, the paint is a little thick, but they are novel.? And with CDS decals,?home-made styrene running boards, wire?stirrups and other details?they look great. I numbered one 51896 with the correct doors in honor of the caboose.



Artwork from photos isn't always the best. I don't know how many reading this have dabbled in the various artwork software packages, but a scan from a photo for the purpose of conversion to decal artwork?always has jagged edges and the artist has to fill in the jags and pixels with a hard edge, the graphic equivalent of drawing a hard edge with an ink pen.? Typographers understand how type is drawn, and they can use the portions of some characters to scale others to maintain a consistent look and proper curves. It's a time consuming process.



Mike Del Vecchio



(Feeling a little sad for the loss of Les Paul, who I got to know over the past eight years or so.? I enjoyed hearing his stories of the old days when he walked with kings.? He was a railroad buff, experimented with strings and magnetic pickups mounted on a piece of rail in Waukesha before building that first guitar. My favorite of his old stories was about operating the Lionel trains on Groucho Marx's large?basement layout. Les derailed one, and Groucho wouldn't let him put it back on the track, Groucho insisted on bringing out the big hook and rerailing with that.)

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, Aug 13, 2009 12:31 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Re: New Lackawanna box car models available







Thanks for the explanations Mike.

The 50-foot car from Branchline has an incorrect typeface on the
reporting mark and the large lettering over it is a modern one, or
at least not the exact one used in 1956 (common problem).
I'm looking at a 40ft box car photo, and the reporting marks look
exactly right -- except for the Ampersand on the model, which is
clearly a different (wrong) style. As for the large lettering, it
looks the same on the two cars (40ft and 50ft) but since I don't
have a photo of a 50ft car I don't know if it's right.

I'm surprised that Branchline got it wrong since they usually did
artwork straight from photos.

I wish the ELHS cars were kits. I like to pre-weather parts before
assembly.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Thermice

al_brown03
 

In Kaminski's book, p 17, is an ACF ad for a 7300-gallon ICC 105A500W tank car, for liquefied CO2 service. It's an insulated "chemical" tank along the general lines of the old Athearn car but two-thirds as big, with a pressure bonnet instead of a dome, and a platform around the bonnet.

I haven't time to search the book exhaustively tonight; there may be other CO2 cars shown.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

As of the late forties, the most common source of gaseous CO2 was the combustion of coke. (Nowadays, it's mostly recovered from ammonia plants.) Upon compression the gas will liquefy and can be shipped that way, at room temperature but under pressure. If pressure is released, the CO2 becomes gaseous again.

At a dry-ice plant, CO2 gas is allowed to expand. Gases cool upon expansion, in this case enough to solidify the material as "snow". (This isn't efficient, and excess gas is recovered.) In a hydraulic press, the "snow" is converted to blocks. These must be kept cold, and are shipped in the familiar heavily-insulated reefers.

Above info from: R.M. Reed and N.C. Updegraff, in "Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology", 3rd ed., eds. R.E. Kirk and D.F. Othmer; Interscience: New York, 1949; vol. 3, pp 128-142.

So, a CO2 tank car would be used to ship the gas and liquid from someplace coke is burnt, to a dry-ice plant. It would need to withstand high pressure and I'd think it'd be insulated.

To be concluded when I get home and look in Kaminski's tank-car book.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@> wrote:

Dry ice is solid CO2.

To be continued, after I look up manufacturing methods ...

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@> wrote:

At the North Shore Model Railroad Club, we have a Thermice tank car, which, we think, carried carbon
dioxide. We'd like to make some realistic waybills for it.

One of the other guys has found a location of the company in Thorofare, NJ, near Paulsboro. That
looks like a dry ice plant, not a place that would originate CO2.

Can anyone provide information on where those cars might have carried CO2 from and to ?

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!






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Re: New Richard Hendrickson book on flats, gondolas and hopper cars

spsalso
 

A fantastic book in a fantastic series!

Mr. Hendrickson, on page 102, wonders why the class LG-3 car didn't work out. I note that the previous class LG-2's (and LG-4's) were designed for crane unloading. Thus, cables or chains were most likely passed from one side of the car to the other under the load and then were all tied up, pretty much, for the crane. On the LG-3, also with rigid log "bunks", if workers did that on the ground, the cables would capture the upper parts of the car side truss. It looks like, to unload this car, you'd need to feed the cables inside the truss--a bit time consuming. It also doesn't look like they allowed a lot of clearance for the pass-through of the cables down near the floor; though that could probably have been easily fixed. Also, once in a great while, the logs might have been loaded such that getting that necessary clearance on the sides might have ranged from difficult to impossible.

That said, it's also possible the logs just overpowered the sides with their weight. Loaded up near the top of the sides, the leverage on the side to floor joint is about double that of an un-modified gon.

Ah, speculation.....

Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: Thermice

al_brown03
 

As of the late forties, the most common source of gaseous CO2 was the combustion of coke. (Nowadays, it's mostly recovered from ammonia plants.) Upon compression the gas will liquefy and can be shipped that way, at room temperature but under pressure. If pressure is released, the CO2 becomes gaseous again.

At a dry-ice plant, CO2 gas is allowed to expand. Gases cool upon expansion, in this case enough to solidify the material as "snow". (This isn't efficient, and excess gas is recovered.) In a hydraulic press, the "snow" is converted to blocks. These must be kept cold, and are shipped in the familiar heavily-insulated reefers.

Above info from: R.M. Reed and N.C. Updegraff, in "Encyclopedia of Chemical Technology", 3rd ed., eds. R.E. Kirk and D.F. Othmer; Interscience: New York, 1949; vol. 3, pp 128-142.

So, a CO2 tank car would be used to ship the gas and liquid from someplace coke is burnt, to a dry-ice plant. It would need to withstand high pressure and I'd think it'd be insulated.

To be concluded when I get home and look in Kaminski's tank-car book.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

Dry ice is solid CO2.

To be continued, after I look up manufacturing methods ...

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@> wrote:

At the North Shore Model Railroad Club, we have a Thermice tank car, which, we think, carried carbon
dioxide. We'd like to make some realistic waybills for it.

One of the other guys has found a location of the company in Thorofare, NJ, near Paulsboro. That
looks like a dry ice plant, not a place that would originate CO2.

Can anyone provide information on where those cars might have carried CO2 from and to ?

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!






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Steam Locomotive Useage on the UP, was: Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Mike Del Vecchio writes:

"In a message dated 08/12/09 00:34:08 Eastern Daylight Time, schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net writes:
These are steam era freight cars, built in January and February 1950. The repack date is 8/55, but
that is easily weathered and replaced. The cars are assembled models.
-----------------------

Steam era, yes, on the N&W, NKP and UP during the harvests. Nice cars, yes."

It is not clear as to what date Mike applies the "UP during the harvests"...1950 or 1955. However, and while this is definitely a "nit" and has little to do with the Lackawanna box car, it is possibly of interest in consideration of when steam power's presence or lack thereof occurred on the UP and, thus, its importance in determining the time period for those of us "who are seriously "steam era". " Hence:

From studying information in Lloyd Stagner's Union Pacific Motive Power in Transition, I think it's reasonable to conclude that seasonal use of steam power on the UP did not occur until perhaps 1956...depending, I supose, on one's definition of "seasonal".

Keep in mind the fact that, unlike many RR's, UP had acquired a very modern fleet of 4-8-4, Challenger and Big Boy steam locomotives beginning in the late '30's and continuing into 1944. It is this fleet, primarily, that UP continued to use in large numbers through the 1950's.

In 1950 UP reduced its steam fleet by 20 to 975 locomotives. Freight train miles hauled by steam was 71.9%, diesels hauling 27.9, turbines 0.2%. Steam passenger train miles dropped to 51.6%. Yard service with steam was 31%. In 1951, the frt train mileage remained the same...71.9% and passenger train mileage dipped slightly to 51.1%. Steam power dominated on the Eastern District [ east of Ogden, UT ]..94.2% for frt, 62.2% for passenger. On the South-Central District [ Ogden-LA, Ogden-Pocatello ] steam accounted for 18.2%, frt, 13.7% for passenger. In the Northwestern District, steam mileage was 57% for frts, 50.9% for passenger. Steam power usage dropped slowly such that in 1952 steam power performed 89.2% of mileage in the Eastern District, 68.7% for the entire RR. Passenger mileage on the Eastern District was 55.4%, 43.4% of the entire RR. In 1952, nationwide, for all RR's, 65.5% of frt ton miles were performed by diesels, 71.5% of passenger car miles. Incidentally, UP found that in frt service, fuel oil costs per 1000 ton miles was 62.7 cents compared to 30.1 cents for coal. In 1953, steam power on the UP still ruled in frt service with 68.7% of system mileage, 78.3% on the Eastern District. Passenger train mileage was 36.1% steam system wide...46.5% on the Eastern District. A significant decline in steam locomotive useage on the UP occurred in 1954 with 34% of frt mileage pulled by steam on the Eastern District, 23.1% system wide, 37.8% of passenger mileage on the Eastern District, 25% system wide. On July 1, 1955, 163 UP steam locomotives were active. This expanded to 422 by Dec 31. In 1955 18.1% of frt train miles, 12.8% of passenger miles was in steam. This service was concentrated between Ogden and Omaha. In March 1956, 4000 class engines [ Big Boys ] were operating between Cheyenne and Green River, and 800 class engines [ 4-8-4 ] and various Challengers were working in Nebraska along with 3700 class Chalengers in helper service in Utah. This changed during the last half on 1956 with 30 800 class, 27 heavy 3900 Challengers, 21 3800 "small" Challengers and all 25 Big Boys active. Various 0-6-0's, 2-8-0's and 2-8-2's found work in the Eastern District. To be sure, steam power had declined but it still pulled 12.2% of frt train miles, 17% of frt ton miles. Even in 1957 in Feb, far from a seasonal harvest time, 13 800 class 4-8-4s were at work, 7 3700 class Challengers were in helper service in Utah, and 18 Big Boys were working between Cheyenne and Green River. A recession in 1957-8 reduced the useage of steam power and it is evident that by then the seasonal use of steam power was prevelent.

Mike Brock


Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks for the explanations Mike.

The 50-foot car from Branchline has an incorrect typeface on the
reporting mark and the large lettering over it is a modern one, or
at least not the exact one used in 1956 (common problem).

I'm looking at a 40ft box car photo, and the reporting marks look
exactly right -- except for the Ampersand on the model, which is
clearly a different (wrong) style. As for the large lettering, it
looks the same on the two cars (40ft and 50ft) but since I don't
have a photo of a 50ft car I don't know if it's right.

I'm surprised that Branchline got it wrong since they usually did
artwork straight from photos.

I wish the ELHS cars were kits. I like to pre-weather parts before
assembly.

Tim O'Connor


Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

MDelvec952
 

After shutting down the computer I thought that comment would create questions asking for a lot of specifics.? And thus my middle-age is showing, as?I can't recall everything since?I didn't buy any because of something I saw at first glance in the hobby shop that wasn't correct and easily fixable.? I did buy loads of undecs, though.



The 50-foot car from Branchline has an incorrect?typeface on the reporting mark and?the large lettering over it is a modern one, or at least not the exact one used in 1956 (common problem). And I kinda recall that the billboard on the model was the 1942 version, but I'd have to see one today.? The color wasn't right on, but that can be fixed in the weathering.? Here's a link to a photo of the model:? http://www.branchline-trains.com/blueprint/50boxcars/50welded/1912.jpg.? While this car is too new for my era, I'd have bought a couple to support it.



From memory, most billboard cars?had typeface and billboard placement issues. And check the numers to make sure the Superior and Youngstown doors are correct.? I'll post those number series from home.



Some of these models are blurring together.? I remember one with black ends on a car that didn't have them (only portions of the 54000-series and higher had black ends).? The IMWX 1937 cars had poling pockets, and Jerry Porter offered them in the correct pre-Phoebe lettering. Any subsequently in billboards through 1955-ish were repainted by?DL&W?and had that version, though what's been offered on models has?factory lettering. Repaints post-1956-'57-ish were done?outside of DL&W's own shops and had significant varations, including no billboard at all.?



Nipping the poling pockets and finishing the corners is an easy thing that would not keep me from buying a well-lettered model.



One of the complications is that there were two billboards, one in 1942 and 1955, with slight differences in artwork and placement, and the stencils at the home shop were slightly different than those at the factory.? The result is that?it's too easy to mix up the artwork (most kit makers lift any billboard to put on any car, then change the numbers, including?resin kit-makers. And?lots of?kit-offered decals?don't have?consistent?verticals and curves.).?



Prime Mover Decals did the artwork for the ELHS cars, and I'm sure they'll be adding accurate decals to its line.



Mike Del Vecchio

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, Aug 13, 2009 1:39 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Lackawanna box car models available







Mike Del Vecchio wrote

I'm not aware of a decorated Phoebe boxcar before the ELHS offering
that's yet been done in the correct combination of lettering, artwork,
era and details.
Are there problems with Branchline kit #1912 (50ft car)?
And Red Caboose #8010 (1944 paint) and #8069 (1955 paint)?

Tim O'Connor


Ex WW2 Troop Sleeper semi-freight car photo source

al.kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

Does anyone know of a source for a hi-res photo copy of the Pullman blt troop sleeper cars as deliveried in 1943 and 1944 . . . builder's or in-train images will do? I'd like to use it/them in a Box Express car article.

Also, from their freight diagram sheets, it appears those express box cars equipped with Allied Full-Cushion trucks with 50-ton journals were restricted to 50,000 pounds capacity, but when returned to "regular" freight car service, were rated back up to 100,000 pound capacities. Is this because of average speeds expected. Did the bulletins restricting the use of these trucks have speed ratings?

Also looking for good images of CGS High-Speed Reefer and Box Express trucks.


Re: Champ Ceasing Business (Was Accucals)

tmolsen@...
 

On Tuesday, I spoke with Connie at Champ to see if her online catalog was up to date. In our conversation, she advised that she had used up all of the decal paper that she had on hand in printing the most popular decals that had been selling well.

She had remarried after Richard's death, but unfortunately her new husband was diagnosed with terminal liver cancer and he subsequently passed away last year. Now she is engaged to marry again about six months from now and said that with all that has gone by in the last three years, if she does not find a buyer for the decal business, she will close it down. The window may extend to early spring 2010, but it may be just after he wedding. She said that presently the business takes a lot of time and she wants to retire to enjoy what life will bring in the future. Can't say that I blame her, as Champ has been in business since 1963 when Richard bought from Max Gray. Connie has been the printer from the time she married Rich until the present.

She has withdrawn the Champ ads which had been running in RMC and is not contemplating advertising again due to the cost of doing so.

In the meantime, she continues to sell decals from stock and advises those using the online catalog to refresh the screen after pulling up the decal lists so as to be sure to get the latest update. Her daughter Kim is handling the online catalog and will be making changes as the stock of decals change.

So, I would suggest that we consult our decal inventories and order what we think that we will need from Champ in the future as the end of the year will come faster than we think. Here is the link for Champ: http://www.minot.com/champ/

Also, I was speaking with Trisha Lofton and she advised that when Champ closes, Sunshine will discontinue the car kits which use specific heralds and lettering that they presently by from Champ.

Trisha advises that everything is on track for Naperville in the fall and hopes that someone will come forth to continue this show next year after they give it up this year. Martin had told me back in February at Timonium that they will continue to make and sell kits as the mail order business is continuing to be strong and that they will be attending shows from time to time, but as vendors only!

Regards,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu


Re: Accucals

roblmclear <rob.mclear2@...>
 

I have been following this thread with interest and I have to say that I have never had a problem with Solvaset and Microscale decals. I have used it straight from the bottle on Microscale decals in a custom painting and finishing business for the past 8 years and have had not the slightest bit of trouble. In fact I have used it on Champ and Oddball decals with the same excellent results.

I don't doubt that others may have had trouble but I have to say that that is not my experience. Does anyone know if Solvaset is sold with a different formula for overseas perhaps? I should also add that I have no connection at all with the product other than being a very satisfied customer.

Rob McLear
Brisbane Australia.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pennsylvania1954" <stevehprr@...> wrote:

Eventually, but they still have a lot of decals to sell first. They just aren't making any new ones.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@> wrote in part:

Hmmm. Champ ceasing business. Will Decal-Set be discontinued, becoming the Kodachrome of our
hobby?


SGL


Re: Accucals

pennsylvania1954
 

Eventually, but they still have a lot of decals to sell first. They just aren't making any new ones.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote in part:


Hmmm. Champ ceasing business. Will Decal-Set be discontinued, becoming the Kodachrome of our
hobby?


SGL


Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

Tim O'Connor
 

Mike Del Vecchio wrote

I'm not aware of a decorated Phoebe boxcar before the ELHS offering
that's yet been done in the correct combination of lettering, artwork,
era and details.
Are there problems with Branchline kit #1912 (50ft car)?
And Red Caboose #8010 (1944 paint) and #8069 (1955 paint)?

Tim O'Connor


Re: Thermice

Tim O'Connor
 

CO2 can be recovered from combustion or chemical processes. It
has many uses. The model you mention belongs on the scrap heap! :-)
There are no HO scale models of CO2 tank cars (the kind with
cylindrical tanks). In the 1950's most CO2 was shipped in
solid form (dry ice) in heavily insulated reefers. There are
models for those.

Tim O'

At 8/12/2009 10:19 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
At the North Shore Model Railroad Club, we have a Thermice tank car, which, we think, carried carbon
dioxide. We'd like to make some realistic waybills for it.

One of the other guys has found a location of the company in Thorofare, NJ, near Paulsboro. That
looks like a dry ice plant, not a place that would originate CO2.

Can anyone provide information on where those cars might have carried CO2 from and to ?

SGL


Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

MDelvec952
 

In a message dated 08/12/09 00:34:08 Eastern Daylight Time, schuyler.larrabee@verizon.net writes:
These are steam era freight cars, built in January and February 1950. The repack date is 8/55, but
that is easily weathered and replaced. The cars are assembled models.
-----------------------

Steam era, yes, on the N&W, NKP and UP during the harvests. Nice cars, yes.

Remember, though, that this initial offering is in a lettering scheme that began mid-1955. The offering coming in a couple of months will be in the 1942 Phoebe Snow billboard factory applied to a 1950-built car.

I'm not aware of a decorated Phoebe boxcar before the ELHS offering that's yet been done in the correct combination of lettering, artwork, era and details. Some have had modern typefaces, wrong number series for the door style, or a mixture of 1942 and 1955 elements on the same car, shop lettering on a factory painted car and vice-versa, wrong colors, and so on. And we won't get into the blue-box Athearn boxcar from many years ago.

The current ELHS offering represents a couple of rare cars of which photos exist, showing factory lettering on a repainted car, which is very interesting.

Full disclosure: I am an ELHS member and was part of the imagineering team. I have two of the current cars, but plan to load up the next version. And I hope ELHS will produce the more numerous 1937 car with the 4/5 dreadnaught end with the correct lettering and door styles.

Mike Del Vecchio


Re: Accucals

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks to all who have advised me on this. It appears that I need to buy a bottle of Solvaset,
which I have only used a few times with a notable lack of success on other decals. I have used
Champ Decal-Set almost exclusively for years and find it does everything I need . . . except work
with Accucals. 8^/ I always use Accu-set on Accucals.


Hmmm. Champ ceasing business. Will Decal-Set be discontinued, becoming the Kodachrome of our
hobby?


SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Donald B. Valentine
Sent: Wednesday, August 12, 2009 10:59 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Accucals



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Schuyler Larrabee"
<schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Thanks, Greg and John. But have you used Solvaset on Accucals?
Schuyler,

Before switching to Microsol and Microset some time ago I used Solvaset on Accucals quite
frequently. If memory
serves, toward the
end of that use I ran into a bottle that seemed stronger than those used previously and promptly
cut it. I have, however,
spoken with George Bishop in recent months and will try to raise the question
directly with him and advise further.

Best wishes, Don Valentine








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