Date   

Re: Universal 5700 brakewheel

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

Tim,
I agree. It is a problem. It is possible that Universal changed wheel designs mid-way through production of the 5700 hand brake but I certainly don't know whether or not that is the case.

There is a second, even worse, problem. I don't think either hand wheel is available in any scale including, by now, 1:1.

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


The problem Gene, is that the RPC illustrates two different
brake wheels on that 5700 housing. So for me, wanting to put
the correct brake wheel on a particular model, I'm stuck!

Tim O'Connor


--------------------------------------
Yeah, Richard, why didn't I say that? I have got to learn to read all the messages before I respond to any of them. Normally a member smarter than me has already got "thar fustest with the mostest."

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@> wrote:

On Aug 17, 2009, at 7:05 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Does anyone have an illustration of this particular brakewheel?
I have a bunch of scans of Universal brakewheels, and Gene Green's
excellent clinic from the San Jose NMRA convention, but none of
them is identified as a 5700. Gene has a brake housing identified
as a 5705...
Clearly shown in Pat Wider's article on brake wheels in RPCyc #10.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Intermountain HO 70 ton Santa Fe Flats

Marty McGuirk
 

Re-lettered or renumbered  . . . or both?



While we're on the subject of the IRC flats two questions -



1. Am I the only one who thinks the New Haven lettering looks a little "heavy"?

2. How accurate are the B&O cars? I thought the B&O 70-ton flats were built after the war (1948 sticks in my head) - I'm just curious if they were the same design as the cars built during the war years.





Thanks in advance.



Marty

----- Original Message -----
From: "Andy Carlson" <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
To: "Steam Era" <stmfc@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2009 3:17:48 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Intermountain HO 70 ton Santa Fe Flats

 




I got the following message from a good Santa Fe modeler:

Hi Andy,
The box arrived to day with no problems. Thanks. But
as usual Intermountain has screwed it up again. The Ft-V
flat is a 50 ton War Emergency car. So the cars will have to
be relettered. See why I prefer to buy kits.
It seems that IM must have placed the wrong paint scheme on their Santa Fe 70 flat cars which were just recently released.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Intermountain HO 70 ton Santa Fe Flats

Andy Carlson
 

I got the following message from a good Santa Fe modeler:

Hi Andy,
The box arrived to day with no problems. Thanks. But
as usual Intermountain has screwed it up again. The Ft-V
flat is a 50 ton War Emergency car. So the cars will have to
be relettered. See why I prefer to buy kits.
It seems that IM must have placed the wrong paint scheme on their Santa Fe 70 flat cars which were just recently released.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Universal 5700 brakewheel

Tim O'Connor
 

The problem Gene, is that the RPC illustrates two different
brake wheels on that 5700 housing. So for me, wanting to put
the correct brake wheel on a particular model, I'm stuck!

Tim O'Connor


--------------------------------------

Yeah, Richard, why didn't I say that? I have got to learn to read all the messages before I respond to any of them. Normally a member smarter than me has already got "thar fustest with the mostest."

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Aug 17, 2009, at 7:05 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Does anyone have an illustration of this particular brakewheel?
I have a bunch of scans of Universal brakewheels, and Gene Green's
excellent clinic from the San Jose NMRA convention, but none of
them is identified as a 5700. Gene has a brake housing identified
as a 5705...
Clearly shown in Pat Wider's article on brake wheels in RPCyc #10.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Caboose Lighting

Jim Betz
 

Armand,
Thanks for the suggestion. The layout I'm doing this for stores
all the trains in hidden staging and getting to the caboose to
turn off the lights would be impossible/inconvenient at best. I'm
going to have to use track power for this one. (And my flicker
free circuit eliminates that problem.)
- Jim


Re: Telephone pole flatcar loads

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

I've seen poles loaded in drop end gondolas with both ends
dropped and the poles sticking out both ends. There was an
"idler flat" on each end underneath the poles sticking out.
And there must have been some wood blocking under the poles
to both keep them above the flat car and to facilitate the
unloading when they got to their destination.
It seems to me that there were "about 15 or so" poles in a
single car but I could be wrong on how many (weight!).
Interestingly enough I don't remember seeing a string of
RR cars all with pole loads and all in the same train. You'd
think that this happened - certainly some orders were for
more poles than what can be loaded in one car!

I saw a lot of piling being driven in the small fishing
community I grew up in - there was a pile driver crew working
"somewhere along the waterfront - almost all the time" and
it was very obvious when they were working ... "Bang! Whoosh!
Bang! Whoosh!" ... and the sound of a pile driver was like
a magnet and you just didn't go past on your bicycle without
stopping to check it out.
Pilings were essentially the same as a phone pole, usually
fir (Pacific Northwest, other areas might be different?) ...
but pilings were treated with creosote from end to end. The
phone poles and power poles were usually only treated on one
end where they went into the ground. When fishing from a
dock you quickly learned not to sit on any of the fresh piles -
you only heard someone called "creosote butt - creosote butt"
once to learn that lesson! And Mom usually changed your
black butt for a reddened one because she had to throw out
those pants ... or you had to wear them again and risk
being called "CB" for the next few years. A never ending
cycle of insult to injury to insult ... ;-)
- Jim

P.S. If you saw a pole in the car with the creosote end
the wrong way would that be reverse polish notation?


Re: Caboose Lighting

Armand Premo
 

FWIW,I have installed a battery operated system in several passenger cars and cabeese.They are flicker free.For more detailed info contact my of list.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: oldrockygn
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2009 11:20 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Caboose Lighting


Jack,
This project is to do about 50 (!) cabeese, most of them brass
and none of them using Kadee trucks. So changing out the trucks
and or wheels is not really an option because they are
'prototypically correct'.
I like your solution of the brass washer on the bolster of a
styrene caboose - simple and effective (with the flicker free
circuit).
- Jim






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Re: Caboose Lighting

Jim Betz
 

Jack,
Sorry - this reply was to a post you made quite some time ago.
It turns out that if you use/reuse the same title line then when
you click on the thread online it includes all of the old stuff
as well. And, dummy that I am, I didn't notice that I was
replying to a post you made a -long- time ago.
Your description of what you did/are doing for the brass
caboose is appreciated and helps.

I'm still concerned about problems that might be introduced
if I put wheel wipers on a truck that has a moving side frame.
Has anyone done this and can report on whether or not it caused
problems? One guy I talked to suggested putting a wiper wire on
both sides (even though one side is already working) - simply
to equalize the forces of the wiper wire.
- Jim

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "oldrockygn" <jimbetz@...> wrote:

Jack,
This project is to do about 50 (!) cabeese, most of them brass
and none of them using Kadee trucks. So changing out the trucks
and or wheels is not really an option because they are
'prototypically correct'.
I like your solution of the brass washer on the bolster of a
styrene caboose - simple and effective (with the flicker free
circuit).
- Jim


Re: PRR H21e quad hopper with riveted side stakes

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Guys;

In my digging, I have been unable to find documentation on the actual
differenes between H21G and H21E, probably due to late date of rebuilding.
The obvious differences are not easily trackable, as some seemed to have hat
section side stakes, and others pressed shapes like the earlier H21E and late
H21A. They show a similarly frustrating mix of riveted and welded, also.

We do know that the H21E had a revised center sill, however, and a
flat-topped interior center sill cover. This flat-topped "A"-framed sill
cover got really beat up, and other than the deletion of cross-stake
reinforcement plates on the outside, and revision of rivet patterns like the
late H21A, there are not many other obvious differences.

Most folks would not know to look for them, so this may all be
rivet-counting!

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
SUVCWORR@aol.com
Sent: Tuesday, August 18, 2009 1:39 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: PRR H21e quad hopper with riveted side stakes




A.T.

It appears you may be confusing the H21B with the H21E.? I have checked the
July 1933 ORER from Al Westerfield's CD of PRR ORERs and found no H21E's.?
There are a number of series of H21A and H21B cars without any
differentiation as well as number series with both H21A and H22A class cars.

From the ORER's, which are not necessarily the most reliable source, the H21B
was first listed in 1931; the H21e in July, 1947.? The H21D (covered hopper
conversion) was first listed in 1935.? It does not seem reasonable that the
H21E would pre-date the H21D.? There was no H21C as far as I have been able
to determine.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: proto48er <atkott@swbell.net <mailto:atkott%40swbell.net> >
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, Aug 17, 2009 9:41 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Re: PRR H21e quad hopper with riveted side stakes

Bruce -

Thanks for the reply! I have really enjoyed the PRR Project group!

First, about ten number series of H21a's in the July, 1933 ORER have the
notation "H21a, H21e" but do not differentiate one type from the other. These
number series have several thousand cars in them. The H21e notation is not
present at all in the January, 1931 or May, 1932 ORER's. Later, starting in
about 1946, additional numbers were added to the front of several of the
number series, and I presume these were also newly converted H21e's, but they
could just as easily have been renumbered H21a's from other number series.
Some other number series had the "H21e" notation added in 1947 that only had
"H21a" before.
There were also some H21b's in there, and I have one of them too! No photo
for it either!

Steve Grabowski had an import business called Keystone Models, and it brought
in "O" scale brass models of the H21, H21a, H21b and H21e from Korea several
years ago. I am not certain that he imported any of the H21e's other than the
pilot model, because his Korean builder dissolved, I think, while the cars
were being made. His website (now dissolved into the ether) stated that the
H21e's were first converted from H21a's in 1930. That was the first I ever
heard that!
However, upon checking the ORER's, he apparently was correct.

Grabowski's website showed photos of PRR #727129, a welded car, but his pilot
model photos showed a riveted car exactly like the Parri car. I am certain
that the Parri car is correct - for how many prototype cars, I have no clue -
because I saw a photo SOMEWHERE on the web of a riveted car! I did not save
the photo because I thought that I would never see one of the six Parri cars
for sale again, but there one was two weeks ago on Ebay!!

The interior of the Parri car has two pair of curved side braces and no
crossbraces. The slope sheets also have the correct pair of longitudinal
support angles under them running from the body bolsters to the ends of the
car.
The only H21a's with these angles were apparently in iron ore service (I have
one of those also.) The centersill is identical to the H21a, which I would
expect of an early 1930's era rebuild (the H21b has the AAR centersill.)
However, the H21e has a flat centersill coverplate somewhat similar to, but
more narrow than, the H21b (a PSC import.) There are triangular reinforcing
plates on the sides of the car at the braces centered on the body bolsters.

My "research" on number series is at home. I tried to determine whether the
Parri car was part of a large series of H21e's or just a few converted in
1930 before the depression hit. I followed the various number series through
the ORER's up to 1949, but all the H21e's were mixed with H21a's and H21b's
in each ORER. I will post the numbers tomorrow. Incidentally, PRR got lax
about putting the class designations in the ORER's by the mid-1950's. No
H21g's listed.

Thanks for the help!

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Bruce Smith"
<smithbf@...> wrote:

On Mon, August 17, 2009 6:02 pm, proto48er wrote:
It is my assumption that the cars converted to H21e's in 1930, which
first
show up
in the 1933 ORER, were cars with riveted side stakes. Is this correct?
A.T.,


What's the total number of cars listed as converted in the 1933 ORER
and what
is
their number series? I find no such cars in the 1943 ORER and no
mention of
this
earlier group in Teichmoeller's book, which has the H21E appearing in
August
1947.

Am I correct in assuming that the 1946 and later conversions were
all welded
side
stake cars?
AFAIK, yes.

I want a riveted side stake car for my March 15th - April 15th, 1948 era.
What's a
modeler to do??
What does the interior look like? Are there triangular crossridge braces?
Does it
have a flat center sill cover plate? If so, then you may be stuck, if
not,
you've
got an H21A, not an H21E.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


One Month to WPM (Western Prototype Modelers Meet)

dh30973
 

WPM 2009 - Western Prototype Modelers Meet
New Date and Location
San Bernardino Station
Saturday September 19, 2009

The west coast's largest gathering for railroad prototype modelers, now in it's 20th year!

9:00 AM to 6:00 PM
San Bernardino Santa Fe Depot
1170 West Third Street. - San Bernardino, CA 92403

Visit WPM and see hundreds of locomotive, freight and passenger car, caboose, MOW, structure, and vehicle prototype models on display while countless 1:1 scale BNSF and UP trains roll-by just feet from the depot.
Clinics and seminars will be offered throughout the day and operating HO & N Scale "Free-mo" modular layout exhibits are planned. Visit the San Bernardino Historical and Railroad Museum located in the west-end of the depot.
Tons of raffle prizes donated by generous hobby retailers, publishers & model manufacturers will be up for grabs.
Bring your modeling projects, finished, or "in the works". Share ideas and techniques with fellow modelers and meet new friends!

Doors Open at 9:00AM

Scheduled Presentations start at 10:00
10:00 Dick Harley - PFE Mechanical Reefer Painting and Lettering 1953-1980
11:15 Craig Walker & Paul Ellis - From Athearn: What is needed to develop a project
12:15 Mini-Raffle and Lunch Break
1:30 Mike Rose - Creating the Port of Erin and Associated Industries
2:45 Tim Frederick - An overview of modern tank car models released from 2004-2009
4:00 Steve Beales & Bob Freitas - Structure Modeling from the Prototype
5:00 Raffle Round 2

San Bernardino depot is served by both Amtrak and Metrolink. Links to schedules are posted on our web site.
Exhibitors: Manufacturers, photographers and publishers will participate in WPM (Exhibitors: pre-registration is required, contact WPM at the phone number below.)
For updated info on presentations, program, schedule and photos of past meets:
www.WesternPrototypeModelers.org or call Joe D'Elia at 760-721-3393

WPM welcomes modelers of all roads, all scales and eras!

WPM Meet admission PRICE REDUCED: $15.00, or $12.00 if you bring a model(s) to display

Plenty of free parking

Dave Hussey
WPM Committee


Re: Caboose Lighting

Jim Betz
 

Jack,
This project is to do about 50 (!) cabeese, most of them brass
and none of them using Kadee trucks. So changing out the trucks
and or wheels is not really an option because they are
'prototypically correct'.
I like your solution of the brass washer on the bolster of a
styrene caboose - simple and effective (with the flicker free
circuit).
- Jim


Re: Universal 5700 brakewheel

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

Yeah, Richard, why didn't I say that? I have got to learn to read all the messages before I respond to any of them. Normally a member smarter than me has already got "thar fustest with the mostest."

Gene Green

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Aug 17, 2009, at 7:05 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Does anyone have an illustration of this particular brakewheel?
I have a bunch of scans of Universal brakewheels, and Gene Green's
excellent clinic from the San Jose NMRA convention, but none of
them is identified as a 5700. Gene has a brake housing identified
as a 5705...
Clearly shown in Pat Wider's article on brake wheels in RPCyc #10.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: MAINE TOFC QUESTION

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

Maine's laws in 1932 placed no limitation on trailer length but restricted the width to 8 ft. and the height to 12 ft. 6 in.

By 1939 the Maine maximum width, height and length were 8', 12'-6" and 40'-0" respectively.

By 1979 the Maine maximum width, height and length were 102", 13'-6" and 56'-6" respectively.

Compared with other states Maine seems to have been on the liberal side as regards semi-trailer length. In 1939 6 states including Maine had a max length of 40'-0". Two states allowed 45'-0" and only Vermont allowed 50'-0". Rhode Island, Maryland and Nevada had no restriction on semi-trailer length. Twenty-one states allowed 35'-0"; 12 33'-0"; 2 30'-0"; 1 27'-0" and 1 26'-6".

In 1979 only five states allowed widths greater than 96" and only Wyoming and Vermont allowed trailers longer than Maine's 56'-6".

I originally set out to gather this sort of information for every state for every year but the "therefores" and "whereases" began to overwhelm my database design so I gave up.

Gene Green


Re: New Lackawanna box car models available, 46000- and 48000-series

MDelvec952
 

Nope. The 46000-46699-series were in four groups of 40-foot double-sheathed cars built by Magor and ACF in 1927, one batch with radial roofs. Sunshine offered this car quite a few years ago, kit 37.9. These lasted in numbers well into the '50s, many getting the Phoebe Snow billboard. They show up in photos in just about any book published with DL&W pictures. RPI offered the 45000-series, similar but older with flat Murphy roofs and ends. These, too, lasted almost as long as the 46000-series, and many got Phoebe billboards, a scheme that began in April 1942.

The 48000-series were steel rebuilds of wood-sided autocars, mostly. One of these, the last in the series, 48899, was rebuilt from a USRA double-sheathed boxcar and had it an X-31-like look to it. The car retained its 5-5-5 Murphy ends and 9'4" inside height, and it was built with "side and roof sheets in one piece," according to the general arrangement drawings for it, and "Diamondette steel plate running board" and matching "step board." Very interesting car. One photo did surface showing it, in the distance in a passing train, so I included it in the Erie / DL&W Color Guide, page 100. I will model it one day. DL&W's Keyser Valley Shops did the rebuilding.

DL&W didn't own a single-sheathed boxcar, even during the 19th Century (unless you count indestructible ends as a technicality).

....Mike Del Vecchio

In a message dated 08/19/09 22:49:03 Eastern Daylight Time, bierglaeser@yahoo.com writes:
All this discussion of DL&W box cars has made me curious about the DL&W's 46000 and 48000 series box cars which seem to have been single-sheathed box cars. Can anyone refer me to a source of information on these cars?

Gene Green


Re: New Lackawanna box car models available

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

All this discussion of DL&W box cars has made me curious about the DL&W's 46000 and 48000 series box cars which seem to have been single-sheathed box cars. Can anyone refer me to a source of information on these cars?

Gene Green


Re: IHB 1937 box car details

MDelvec952
 

In a message dated 08/19/09 10:57:43 Eastern Daylight Time, destorzek@mchsi.com writes:
While "swage" seems be applicable, it is really the term for the process that forms the offset, not the finished result. Some place I just ran into the term "swaged joggle", which defines both the process and the result. The same would be true for "swaged offset". But, do we care by what process the offset is formed? We still have to define what is offset or joggled. It seems to me that describing car sides as "offset lap seems" or "plain lap seems" gets the job done and leaves no question what is being discussed.
I had trouble accepting the name "crimped seams," which is why I put it in quotes in my original note. "Offset seams" seems to do the job, versus rivited seams.

....Mike Del Vecchio


Re: IHB 1937 box car details

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Well, it was a long shot anyway. Once you threw the gauntlet down the likelihood of changing your mind rapidly approached zero.

To paraphrase Galileo: "Nevertheless, it is an offset joint!"

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, August 19, 2009 9:19 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: IHB 1937 box car details



Kurt, those are boiler seams and they show the plate edges "offset"
or overlapping -- i.e. lap seams. I think the illustration you are
referring to shows THREE plates, of which the one with a bend in it
is a reinforcement plate.

Nice try, but no ceegar.

Tim

If someone can find a published prototype name for this type of seam,
I'll use it.
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>

http://books.google.com/books?id=PJQjAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA363&lpg=RA2-PA363&dq=offset+rivet+seam&source=bl&ots=eNnztrn1fW&sig=MINQn-Jh67GEU0IACOL77nMcVuw&hl=en&ei=FpSMSr_4NMPJlAfzpd26CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6#v=onepage&q=offset%20rivet%20seam&f=false

Railway and Locomotive Engineering, pg 363: "Fig 12 is a double rivetted seam of . . . with an offset strip of 3/8 strip on the inside . . ."

The figure shows a strip with an offset formed into it. The joint is an offset joint.

KL


Re: IHB 1937 box car details

Tim O'Connor
 

Kurt, those are boiler seams and they show the plate edges "offset"
or overlapping -- i.e. lap seams. I think the illustration you are
referring to shows THREE plates, of which the one with a bend in it
is a reinforcement plate.

Nice try, but no ceegar.

Tim

If someone can find a published prototype name for this type of seam,
I'll use it.
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>

http://books.google.com/books?id=PJQjAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA363&lpg=RA2-PA363&dq=offset+rivet+seam&source=bl&ots=eNnztrn1fW&sig=MINQn-Jh67GEU0IACOL77nMcVuw&hl=en&ei=FpSMSr_4NMPJlAfzpd26CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6#v=onepage&q=offset%20rivet%20seam&f=false

Railway and Locomotive Engineering, pg 363: "Fig 12 is a double rivetted seam of . . . with an offset strip of 3/8 strip on the inside . . ."

The figure shows a strip with an offset formed into it. The joint is an offset joint.

KL


Re: IHB 1937 box car details

kurt_laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

If someone can find a published prototype name for this type of seam,
I'll use it.
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>


http://books.google.com/books?id=PJQjAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA2-PA363&lpg=RA2-PA363&dq=offset+rivet+seam&source=bl&ots=eNnztrn1fW&sig=MINQn-Jh67GEU0IACOL77nMcVuw&hl=en&ei=FpSMSr_4NMPJlAfzpd26CA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=6#v=onepage&q=offset%20rivet%20seam&f=false

Railway and Locomotive Engineering, pg 363: "Fig 12 is a double rivetted seam of . . . with an offset strip of 3/8 strip on the inside . . ."

The figure shows a strip with an offset formed into it. The joint is an offset joint.

KL


Re: Telephone pole flatcar loads

CJ Riley
 

The Train Shed Cyc No 36 has a number of loading diagrams (1919) incliding telephone poles.

CJ Riley

--- On Tue, 8/18/09, tgregmrtn@aol.com <tgregmrtn@aol.com> wrote:

From: tgregmrtn@aol.com <tgregmrtn@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Telephone pole flatcar loads
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, August 18, 2009, 11:39 PM






 





Lee,



There were rules for loading open top cars with poles, and they were

published by the ARR, someone must have a set of diagrams. IIRC the standard

size of a Utility Pole was 39-feet, and telegraph poles were 52-feet, at

least that is what I seem to remember. Butts to the end of the car and tips to

the center two rows high and then tips out and butts to the center for the

next row then switch back, but again you"ll need a diagram to work from. I

would be surprised if the diagrams don't show some banding in layers...



For good looking general purpose poles, I would suggest that you use what

Richard Hendrickson suggested to me, Bamboo Chop Sticks, what a great

suggestion for poles, not more tapering dowel rod. Poles were loaded by weight

not volume so it would depend on the capacity of your car and the weight of

each pole.



All poles are tapered and for utility poles 1 inch in 10-feet is the

standard and they were treat with either creosote for most power poles and

pilings were traditionally treated with "Dow-Penta" in dark oil or light oil for

exposed pilings.



Greg Martin





Lee you wrote:



"I'm preparing a special movement of telephone pole loads over a friend's

layout set in 1955. Does anyone have advice on how they would have been

loaded? I'm planning on using 1/8" wooden dowels cut about 6" long and loaded

in groups of about 9 or 10 wide with stakes in the pockets. How many layers

would be appropriate for a load like this? I know that real poles were

slightly tapered, but I doubt if I'll try to replicate that. Were longer poles

of 80'-100' transported by rail often? I assume they would have been

hauled in 65' drop end gons with idler flats.



Lee A. Gautreaux - The RailGoat"



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