Date   

Re: Sill Steps

Lawrence Rast
 

Terrific post, Richard. Many thanks!

Lawrence Rast

On Sun, Aug 30, 2009 at 11:45 PM, Richard
Hendrickson<rhendrickson@...> wrote:


On Aug 30, 2009, at 9:15 AM, Jim Betz wrote:

.... The best thing, of course, is to replace the plastic step with a
brass one - it is a lot stronger ... and often looks better.
Jim goes on at some length about this, and I entirely agree. Sill
steps are the most vulnerable parts on most freight car models and
plastic ones can be broken off in even a minor derailment (to say
nothing about the ham-fisted operators on many club layouts). I
recently built a kit in which the styrene steps were so fragile that
three of the four broke as I was (very carefully) removing them from
the sprue.

I use A-Line flat wire steps on almost all of my freight car models;
if none of the three available styles is correct, they can usually be
bent or tweaked to make accurate replacements for plastic steps.
I've learned a couple of quick tricks which improve the process.
First, I anneal the steps by heating them to dull red with a
resistance soldering tool and quenching them in water. They can then
be bent as needed without breaking, and that also removes the clear
coating that prevents them from tarnishing (and also tends to prevent
paint from adhering). I then blacken them with chemical blackener,
which slightly etches the metal so it takes paint very well and also
prevents the shiny metal from showing through if the paint gets
rubbed off. I drill mounting holes with a #69 drill bit; that's
slightly oversize but makes them easy to install, and they can then
be secured in place with a drop of gap-filling CA adhesive. If
needed, small bits of styrene can be cemented behind the side sills
to provide a secure mounting pad. Final adjustments are easy to
make, since the metal step is now soft, and if it's damaged later,
it's a simple matter to bend it back into shape.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Sill Steps

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 30, 2009, at 9:15 AM, Jim Betz wrote:

.... The best thing, of course, is to replace the plastic step with a
brass one - it is a lot stronger ... and often looks better.
Jim goes on at some length about this, and I entirely agree. Sill
steps are the most vulnerable parts on most freight car models and
plastic ones can be broken off in even a minor derailment (to say
nothing about the ham-fisted operators on many club layouts). I
recently built a kit in which the styrene steps were so fragile that
three of the four broke as I was (very carefully) removing them from
the sprue.

I use A-Line flat wire steps on almost all of my freight car models;
if none of the three available styles is correct, they can usually be
bent or tweaked to make accurate replacements for plastic steps.
I've learned a couple of quick tricks which improve the process.
First, I anneal the steps by heating them to dull red with a
resistance soldering tool and quenching them in water. They can then
be bent as needed without breaking, and that also removes the clear
coating that prevents them from tarnishing (and also tends to prevent
paint from adhering). I then blacken them with chemical blackener,
which slightly etches the metal so it takes paint very well and also
prevents the shiny metal from showing through if the paint gets
rubbed off. I drill mounting holes with a #69 drill bit; that's
slightly oversize but makes them easy to install, and they can then
be secured in place with a drop of gap-filling CA adhesive. If
needed, small bits of styrene can be cemented behind the side sills
to provide a secure mounting pad. Final adjustments are easy to
make, since the metal step is now soft, and if it's damaged later,
it's a simple matter to bend it back into shape.

Richard Hendrickson


WIF 106 car

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

From Bill Welch:

Regarding the WIF 106 car, this is actually one of 10 I believe came from the High Point Thomasville & Denton Railroad. These were 10 foot inside height cars with Duryea underframes.


Steve Funaro told me he offered these HPT&D cars a couple of shows within the last couple of years but withdrew them because they did not sell. I sent him scans of the two photos I have in WIF service along with a scan of the Champ decal set I have trying to get him to offer the cars as WIF. He has not advertised or offered them. Very frustrating!


WIF also had some steel rebuilds secondhand from a NE railroad I believe we will be seeing from another resin kit maker.


Bill Welch


Blue Coal Hoppers

wulantowag <SUVCWORR@...>
 

Check the archives and did not find the answer to these questions. What is the time period when the "blue coal" P/L was applied to hoppers by the Antracite roads? To which roads and cars was it applied?

TIA

Rich Orr


Re: ORER request

earlyrail
 

Sent direct were images of
Dec 1911
April 1905
January 1904
April 1902
January 1901
January 1900
not listed in March 1899

Howard Garner
Pickens, SC

--- In STMFC@..., "Frank Valoczy" <destron@...> wrote:


Would anyone be able to provide any pre-1912 ORER listings for Imperial
Oil, Ltd.?

Thanks,

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: ORER request

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Frank - Send me your email address and I'll send you 1905. - Al

----- Original Message -----
From: Frank Valoczy
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2009 5:00 PM
Subject: [STMFC] ORER request



Would anyone be able to provide any pre-1912 ORER listings for Imperial
Oil, Ltd.?

Thanks,

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Tank car detail

Jim Betz
 

Schuyler,

One thing you can do is to put a very small piece of styrene on the
underside of the car that is right up against the drop step - I'm
talking about a thin piece that is flat on the frame and back up under
the model. This will re-inforce the step where it hits the frame but
be 'invisible' to the viewer. I've used regular strip styrene for
this such as a scale 2x4. It adds a small but critical amount of
strength to the step. I only do this for very fine detail plastic
steps (see below for my normal approach/response to a broken step
and/or fine detail plastic).
The best thing, of course, is to replace the plastic step with a
brass one - it is a lot stronger ... and often looks better. But I'll
admit that I don't put brass steps on all the time. If it is a model
that I'm going to paint and decal then I will always use brass steps.
If it is a factory painted RTR model that I'm only doing the couplers
and weathering ... then I usually opt to replace the plastic steps
with brass only when one of the plastic ones has broken off ... and
then I'll do them all at the same time. If I'm building a painted kit
that has separate plastic steps I usually replace those with brass from
the get go. Yes, I love the super fine detail parts and if you
replace them with generic brass steps you loose that - but I've
found that normal handling to put them on and off the layout and
fix derailments results in a broken step too soon to put those
guaranteed to break steps on.
I have a small piece of foam that I stick them into and shoot them
in large quantities - two or more bags worth at a time - and then put
them back in the bag - when they're dry - to be used as "stock".
I run my trains - they aren't "just show pieces". All of them. If
the details get damaged ... so be it. That doesn't mean that I don't
detail them - it just means that if I do it doesn't affect whether
or not I will run them.
- Jim


Re: Tank car detail

Schuyler Larrabee
 

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Schuyler Larrabee"
<schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

On the typical tank car, are the steps at the ends, suspended from the side frame, provided with
any
diagonal brace back to the end of the frame? I have looked at a few photos but not found one
where
that is clear.

Specifically, I'm asking about SHPX cars, but it would seem that this would be a typical form of
construction.

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!
Schuyler,
The Speedwitch Media Tank Cars book ( Volume-2 ) has
some good close-up shots of this area of tank cars.
They may be helpful in providing clarification for you.

Ron dePierre
Thanks, Ron. That book isn't yet in my library.

SGL





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Re: Tank car detail

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Thanks, Richard. I was wondering as the steps on the LL P2K tanks are pretty fragile, and a brace
would help, but if it's not there on the prototype, it's not on the model.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Saturday, August 29, 2009 5:38 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Tank car detail



On Aug 29, 2009, at 1:12 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

On the typical tank car, are the steps at the ends, suspended from
the side frame, provided with any
diagonal brace back to the end of the frame? I have looked at a
few photos but not found one where
that is clear.

Specifically, I'm asking about SHPX cars, but it would seem that
this would be a typical form of
construction.
Schuyler, diagonal braces of the kind you describe were common on
General American tank cars, where there were no stub side sills, but
absent on SHPX cars built by American Car & Foundry, as most SHPX
cars were.

Richard Hendrickson




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Re: Tank car detail

gn999gn
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

On the typical tank car, are the steps at the ends, suspended from the side frame, provided with any
diagonal brace back to the end of the frame? I have looked at a few photos but not found one where
that is clear.

Specifically, I'm asking about SHPX cars, but it would seem that this would be a typical form of
construction.

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!
Schuyler,
The Speedwitch Media Tank Cars book ( Volume-2 ) has
some good close-up shots of this area of tank cars.
They may be helpful in providing clarification for you.

Ron dePierre




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Database version: 6.13150
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Re: Athearn airslides

gn999gn
 

--- In STMFC@..., "killercarp" <killercarp@...> wrote:

My undecorated Athearn airslides showed up yesterday. They appear to be bare plastic and unassembled, more or less ideal for my purposes.

The parts diagram shows numbers for 5 different bodies, early, intermediate V1, intermediate V2, late V1, and late V2. I believe this first batch is the early version. I was not aware there were that many variations. Can anyone offer insight into what build years the "early" version would be appropriate for? I had plans to build prototypes with build dates of 1954 and 1958.

I know the first cars came out in 1954. Apologies in advance if my question goes out beyond the 1960 end date of the group.

Thanks,
Tim VanMersbergen
Tim,

Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia (RPC) #17 features an expose
on the GATC 2600 cu.ft. "Airslides" written by Ed Hawkins.
Still in print and available at this time.
It is a nice write-up containing some fine photo images.
This apparently is the first in a series of "Airside" articles.
Hope to see part-2 soon. ( Hint, hint ! LOL! )

Ron dePierre


ORER request

Frank Valoczy <destron@...>
 

Would anyone be able to provide any pre-1912 ORER listings for Imperial
Oil, Ltd.?

Thanks,

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: Tank car detail

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 29, 2009, at 1:12 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

On the typical tank car, are the steps at the ends, suspended from
the side frame, provided with any
diagonal brace back to the end of the frame? I have looked at a
few photos but not found one where
that is clear.

Specifically, I'm asking about SHPX cars, but it would seem that
this would be a typical form of
construction.
Schuyler, diagonal braces of the kind you describe were common on
General American tank cars, where there were no stub side sills, but
absent on SHPX cars built by American Car & Foundry, as most SHPX
cars were.

Richard Hendrickson


Tank car detail

Schuyler Larrabee
 

On the typical tank car, are the steps at the ends, suspended from the side frame, provided with any
diagonal brace back to the end of the frame? I have looked at a few photos but not found one where
that is clear.

Specifically, I'm asking about SHPX cars, but it would seem that this would be a typical form of
construction.

SGL
La vita e breve, mangiate prima il dolce!






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Athearn airslides

killercarp
 

My undecorated Athearn airslides showed up yesterday. They appear to be bare plastic and unassembled, more or less ideal for my purposes.

The parts diagram shows numbers for 5 different bodies, early, intermediate V1, intermediate V2, late V1, and late V2. I believe this first batch is the early version. I was not aware there were that many variations. Can anyone offer insight into what build years the "early" version would be appropriate for? I had plans to build prototypes with build dates of 1954 and 1958.

I know the first cars came out in 1954. Apologies in advance if my question goes out beyond the 1960 end date of the group.

Thanks,
Tim VanMersbergen


C&NW Box Car Book (was Re: Rock Island box car? - How about C&NW?)

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

Speaking of Jeff Koeller, what happened to the book on C&NW box cars he was going to publish? Is anyone here in contact with Jeff? Did Jeff have a publisher lined up? Was it Hundman?

Gene Green


Checking coupler level: Was Re-trucking with TMW Dalman 2-level

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

IMHO, there is only one way to check a proper coupler level, and that is to check the height of the coupler HEAD when coupler is actually LEVEL. There is no other way.

The common handy Kadee coupler height gauges that we all rely upon unintentionally fool us to think that only the height of the magnetic pin matters, because that is all that it really measures, leaving it up to the casual user to sight (or not) across to determine whether or not the coupler heads are actually aligned, and that they are level (not drooped)!

The Micro-Mark coupler gauge has a shelf to measure proper coupler head height, and I also have a similar coupler gauge of unknown parentage that effectively does the same thing.

Coupler droop is a major factor in determining coupler height because virtually none of the Kadee or clone coupler shanks fit tightly into the usual Athearn/Kadee coupler box (the interior height of which varies all over the map). Although such droop is minimized by the short shank couplers, and maximized by the long shank couplers observable droop can affect effective coupler head height by up to 0.040" (the total of two red washers, and one gray washer).

Judging droop can be misleading inasmuch as in normal repose a given coupler might well stay level, but under tension coupled in a train, unwelcome inherent droop may well become evident as either promoted by draft angle, or one or the other of the heads of the adjoined couplers is not at the proper height. The ultimate price paid by the unwary in this regard is when the coupler judged to be OK on casual measurement on the coupler gauge is pulled down when under tension, and the magnetic pin catches the next closure rail pitching the cars off on to the floor (how do I know?).

Managing or eliminating coupler droop is for another post, but in short, this ubiquitous (understatement!) problem will not be eliminated until manufacturers decide that their couplers and coupler boxes need to be engineered together as a functioning unit. At the moment, only the Accumate Proto coupler/box is so engineered.

My closing advice that if the critical modeler will meticulously address with each piece of his rolling stock both the maintenance of accurate coupler head height, and the minimizing of coupler droop issues, visually-satisfying trouble-free operations will surely ensue. By doing so, IMHO, we can also at last eliminate the current flow of countless cars passing by jacked up on washers and bushings, as they were in flood pants :-).

Denny




Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


Re: C&O "For Progress"

mforsyth127
 

MANY THANKS to all that provided info and insight into the C&O lettering schemes!

Matt Forsyth

Modeling the D&H Penn Division/
Erie Jefferson Division in "O"
Scale, Fall of 1951


Re: Photo Help -- LV "Wrongway" Door Boxcars

chapbob@...
 

Don Burn comments, "I believe these were covered by "Essential Freight
Cars: in the February
2008 RMC."


Don --
I can't believe I missed this! Since your note I discovered that the issue
is Feb 2006, but a big thanks for the lead. And thanks to all who
responded with the other photo sources -- it's a rainy day here, and it's great to
be able to keep rolling on this project.

All the best,
Bob Chapman


Re: Stucki Side Bearings (Was Re-trucking with TMW Dalman 2-level)

tmolsen@...
 

Steve,

You are correct regarding the spelling of "Stucki", the firm that produced side bearings for freight cars. Thanks for catching the error and making the correction. Never try to spell something when it is 3 AM in the morning.

You will find that there were at least six other firms making side bearings with rollers, some with single and some with multiple rollers. There were plain side bearings without rollers and one design that was a rocker (with a "T" shape instead of the roller) side bearing. You can find these in the truck parts sections of most Car Builders Cyclopedia's.

Regards,

Thomas M. Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...

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