Date   

DL&W 53000-53259

Brian Carlson <brian@...>
 

All:
I got the below from another list. Does anyone have any more information, or
know a way I can find out what type of trucks are being referred to by the
side frame pattern?

The DL&W Freight Car Classification book lists the details for these cars as
follows:

"100 cars have A.S.F. side frame pattern No. 21359-AE..."

"150 cars have Symington-Gould side frame pattern No. TF-5318..."

No mention is made whether or not a particular batch from the series got
which sideframes...

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: 33 inch wheels

roblmclear <rob.mclear2@...>
 

Well Al, what did the romans ever do for us?

Rob.

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:



Can we blame it on the Romans?



Al Kresse


----- Original Message -----
From: "snoqualmier" <leethwaits@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, September 7, 2009 11:33:33 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] 33 inch wheels

Why and when did the use of 33 inch wheels become standard on freight cars?

Lee



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Great Northern 34'-4" coal & ore car, Series 180371-180766

gary laakso
 

I am working on the Funaro & Camerlengo version of this car (its from the 1995 AW Enterprises urethane kit of this car) and noticed that it omits the 40 rivets on the side sill wood beam shown in the book Great Northern Lines East book at page 184. Plus, both versions of the kits omitted the outside airline. Eyeballing the that picture, it appears that the Arch Decals size .014 rivets are the closest in size. It looks like the air brake pipe holders can be the odd round head part used for holding the grab iron on the end walks. I have not located any area to hold any weight, so this car will need a coal load, so the top of the car braces will have to be added after the coal load is inside covering a weight.
If these modifications work, I will need to update my 1995 version of this kit, though i likes its Central Valley archbar trucks. One question, the rear of the car shown in the picture only shows the car number, not the GN reporting marks. Is that unusual for this type of car?

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...


Bridge & Building Cars Available For Research

thecitrusbelt <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

While attending this past week's Pacific Southwest Region/NMRA Convention in Las Vegas, NV, I came across a retired Union Pacific caboose (25330?) and two pre-1920 UP bridge & building maintenance cars. The two B & B cars were built in Las Vegas specifically as B & B cars, I was told.

The owner's husband is a car broker in the Las Vegas area and acquired the cars through some of his dealings. The owner is using the B & B cars for storage.

If anyone is interested in doing on-site research the owner is agreeable to allowing access. Please contact me OFF LIST and I will provide the contact information.

By the way, there is a former Santa Fe light weight coach (2913), as well as a G scale garden railroad at this location.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: ORER QUESTION

leakinmywaders
 

Tim and Brian: When I referred to the DTI's 40-ft X31c double door round roof boxcars as "clones" on another list, I was corrected by Rich Orr, who said it thusly:

--- In PRRPro@..., SUVCWORR@... wrote:
...
These were not X31 clones. The were X31 and subclass cars which were
originally leased by the PRR to the DT&I and subsequently sold to
the DT&I. The
cars were carried in the PRR listings in the ORER for a period of
time with a
note leased to DT&I. I don't have or have access to the issue of
the ORER
when they were dropped so I can't tell when the sale took place.

Rich Orr
So taking this and additional info from NP records, it appears these boxcars were built in 1937 by Greenville Steel Co. to PRR plans and for the PRR as original owner. They were popular cars; DT&I bought them after their initial lease, and after the DT&I sold them to A.A. Morrison in the 1960s for lease to the NP, that road too later bought them. These were among the few lots among the many refurbished boxcars it leased that the NP decided were worth purchasing outright.

I'm presently working on an article on the NP's X31 design leaser boxcars and if anyone has further information on their history, or can offer up a publishable in-service photograph in their DT&I life, I'd much appreciate hearing about it.

Chris Frissell
Polson, MT


--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Yes, that's right Brian. That's why I didn't write "ex-PRR X31c". :-)

Tim


DTI 12128
From series 12000-12399 built 1937, these are PRR X31c round roof
box cars
I think these were just clones of Pennsy round roof box cars, and never owned by PRR. The trucks under these cars were Self-Aligning Double Truss Spring Plankless with Coil-Elliptic spring package (a favorite truck of DT&I's) and not PRR's 2D-F12 coil-elliptic truck.

Tahoe Model Works's new Coil-Elliptic truck is a close match, if you don't mind the spring plank detail.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


Re: 33 inch wheels

Charles Hladik
 

They gave us the "Railroad Roman" font, of course.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 9/7/2009 7:02:52 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
rob.mclear2@... writes:




Well Al, what did the romans ever do for us?

Rob.

--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) ,
water.kresse@, wate



Can we blame it on the Romans?



Al Kresse


----- Original Message -----
From: "snoqualmier" <leethwaits@lee>
To: _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...)
Sent: Monday, September 7, 2009 11:33:33 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] 33 inch wheels

Why and when did the use of 33 inch wheels become standard on freight
cars?

Lee



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 33 inch wheels

water.kresse@...
 

Can we blame it on the Romans?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "snoqualmier" <leethwaits@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, September 7, 2009 11:33:33 AM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] 33 inch wheels

Why and when did the use of 33 inch wheels become standard on freight cars?

Lee


Re: 33 inch wheels

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Maybe not the particular "Why?" you were looking for, but the analysis of contact stresses between two objects favors two flat surfaces touching each other. Failing that, with one surface flat (the rail) and the other not (the wheel), stresses are minimized and the load carrying capability maximized when the wheel is as large as possible. Rolling resistance is also reduced with larger wheels. The standard size nowadays is 36 inches, I think, but many double stack cars - like depressed center cars in the steam era - use 28 inch wheels to gain extra room for cargo under the clearance limits.

Why 33 rather than 32 or 34? I dunno, but they seem to have settled on that number very early on.

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: snoqualmier

Why and when did the use of 33 inch wheels become standard on freight cars?


33 inch wheels

snoqualmier <leethwaits@...>
 

Why and when did the use of 33 inch wheels become standard on freight cars?

Lee


Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Tim O'C. expresses a need for protective devices, i.e. protective of ham-handedness, that will screw into bolster holes during kit construction. An easy device that will at least partly serve this purpose is the routine install of a pair of empty plastic truck frames. I keep a cup full of these discards around for just such purposes.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


Re: Naperville meet oct. 2009 -share a room

Joseph Lofland
 

Richard,

Dave passed me on to you. I'm lookint for a romate. I have the room
reserved. Are you intedresterd stoill?

Joe Lofland

On Sun, Sep 6, 2009 at 6:58 PM, Richard Hendrickson <
rhendrickson@...> wrote:



On Sep 3, 2009, at 4:26 PM, up4884114152002 wrote:

My name is Dave Friedman and I am looking for someone
to share a 2 bedroom room at the Meet. I am arriving
on Thursday afternoon and have a room already reserved. 2 double beds.
i am staying til Sunday morning so I am looking for someone to
share the 3 nights charges. the room is $94/night plus tax. I need
someone
who is a non-snorer please. i am 65 years old and from New York
City where I am an attorney and model railroader. Please email me
at work so we can work out the details.dlfriedman@...<details.dlfriedman%40legal-aid.org>
Dave, I've been out of town for three days, so I'm late responding,
and you probably have a roommate lined up by now. But if not, I'll
be arriving Thursday night, leaving Sunday, and would be pleased to
share a room with you. (PS: I don't snore).

Richard Hendrickson





1913 & 1917 ORERs

Mark Mathu
 

Full versions of the 2/1913 & 6/1917 Official Railway Equipment Registers
are on-line at Google Books:
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22official+railway+equipment+register%22&as
_brr=1

__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.
The Green Bay Route: http://www.greenbayroute.com/


Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

Brian Carlson <brian@...>
 

Yes, noticed that, but to be honest, if the model is on the track no one
notices. I'll have my Protowest car and the IM car with me at Naperville, as
a side by side comparison.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
rwitt_2000
Sent: Sunday, September 06, 2009 9:03 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car


Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

rwitt_2000
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian Carlson" <brian@...> wrote:

I agree with you Bruce, My B&O car is complete, much in the same way
you did
it, except I managed to not break any stirrups or the air hoses. I did
sand
two fingernails though. Maybe the next runs will compensate for the
tape
thickness. I used Barge cement to reattach my deck. I have had too
many
issues with ACC popping due to different shrinkage and expansion
rates.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

Bruce and Brian,

Thanks for the advice about removing the wood deck.

Have other also noticed that the InterMountain AAR flat car model lacks
the "floor stringers". The resin model from ProtoWest Models does model
them as they appear on the drawing of the flat car designed for the ERIE
RR.

Bob Witt
Indianapolis, Indiana


Tichy Bolsters was..RE: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

Brian Carlson <brian@...>
 

Be careful with these. I "pressed" one into a bolster and on removal it
broke, causing me to have to re-drill and tap the screw hole. I modified
them by inserting longer 2-56 screws from the bottom and screwing them into
the bolsters now when I use them.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Rob
Kirkham
Sent: Sunday, September 06, 2009 6:26 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

I think Tichy includes a pair of small T shaped plastic parts in the USRA SS

kit that would work to protect some of the underbody. They press fit into
the bolsters until the trucks are ready to be applied. I do not see a
reason you couldn't insert them (without glue of course) and then glue their

bases to some .06" styrene sheet cut a little wider than the outline of the
car (looking from the track up). It wouldn't stop every ding, but most of
them.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 06, 2009 10:54 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

All this handling has resulted in two more repairs. Both the air hoses
and the stirrup steps did not survive my ham handed work, so they will
have to be replaced. In addition, I have replaced the wheels with 0.088
tread wheels from Branchline and the #5 clones with Kadee #58 couplers.
Regards
Bruce Smith

Bruce, I need a tool item as follows: a device that screws into
the truck bolster (remove trucks first) and that projects outwards
creating a protective "box" around the sill steps. With one of these
devices screwed into each bolster, I could work on virtually any
freight car -- painting, details, repairs, decaling -- without any
danger to the delicate sill steps, brake hoses, cut levers etc.

I have such an item for painting -- a metal jig with two metal
"handles" that screw into the car and into the jig, so the car can
be painted easily without having to touch the car body. But when
working on the car one wants to handle the car, lay it down, etc
and this always involves risk to the small details.

I can't tell you how many brake hoses and sill steps I've broken and
had to replace by now. I'm sure it numbers in the dozens. Usually I have
replacement parts, but not always. I'd much rather not break them in the
first place.

Tim O'Connor






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Naperville meet oct. 2009 -share a room

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 3, 2009, at 4:26 PM, up4884114152002 wrote:

My name is Dave Friedman and I am looking for someone
to share a 2 bedroom room at the Meet. I am arriving
on Thursday afternoon and have a room already reserved. 2 double beds.
i am staying til Sunday morning so I am looking for someone to
share the 3 nights charges. the room is $94/night plus tax. I need
someone
who is a non-snorer please. i am 65 years old and from New York
City where I am an attorney and model railroader. Please email me
at work so we can work out the details.dlfriedman@...
Dave, I've been out of town for three days, so I'm late responding,
and you probably have a roommate lined up by now. But if not, I'll
be arriving Thursday night, leaving Sunday, and would be pleased to
share a room with you. (PS: I don't snore).

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

Robert kirkham
 

I think Tichy includes a pair of small T shaped plastic parts in the USRA SS kit that would work to protect some of the underbody. They press fit into the bolsters until the trucks are ready to be applied. I do not see a reason you couldn't insert them (without glue of course) and then glue their bases to some .06" styrene sheet cut a little wider than the outline of the car (looking from the track up). It wouldn't stop every ding, but most of them.

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Sunday, September 06, 2009 10:54 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

All this handling has resulted in two more repairs. Both the air hoses
and the stirrup steps did not survive my ham handed work, so they will
have to be replaced. In addition, I have replaced the wheels with 0.088
tread wheels from Branchline and the #5 clones with Kadee #58 couplers.
Regards
Bruce Smith

Bruce, I need a tool item as follows: a device that screws into
the truck bolster (remove trucks first) and that projects outwards
creating a protective "box" around the sill steps. With one of these
devices screwed into each bolster, I could work on virtually any
freight car -- painting, details, repairs, decaling -- without any
danger to the delicate sill steps, brake hoses, cut levers etc.

I have such an item for painting -- a metal jig with two metal
"handles" that screw into the car and into the jig, so the car can
be painted easily without having to touch the car body. But when
working on the car one wants to handle the car, lay it down, etc
and this always involves risk to the small details.

I can't tell you how many brake hoses and sill steps I've broken and
had to replace by now. I'm sure it numbers in the dozens. Usually I have
replacement parts, but not always. I'd much rather not break them in the
first place.

Tim O'Connor






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

mcindoefalls
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Bruce, I need a tool item as follows: a device that screws into
the truck bolster (remove trucks first) and that projects outwards
creating a protective "box" around the sill steps.
Tim, I can't exactly picture what this "tool" would look like, but I understand your goal. Couldn't something be cobbled up from relatively thick (.060, maybe?) styrene?

Walt Lankenau


Re: Update - IM Santa Fe Ft-V flat car

Tim O'Connor
 

All this handling has resulted in two more repairs. Both the air hoses
and the stirrup steps did not survive my ham handed work, so they will
have to be replaced. In addition, I have replaced the wheels with 0.088
tread wheels from Branchline and the #5 clones with Kadee #58 couplers.
Regards
Bruce Smith

Bruce, I need a tool item as follows: a device that screws into
the truck bolster (remove trucks first) and that projects outwards
creating a protective "box" around the sill steps. With one of these
devices screwed into each bolster, I could work on virtually any
freight car -- painting, details, repairs, decaling -- without any
danger to the delicate sill steps, brake hoses, cut levers etc.

I have such an item for painting -- a metal jig with two metal
"handles" that screw into the car and into the jig, so the car can
be painted easily without having to touch the car body. But when
working on the car one wants to handle the car, lay it down, etc
and this always involves risk to the small details.

I can't tell you how many brake hoses and sill steps I've broken and
had to replace by now. I'm sure it numbers in the dozens. Usually I have
replacement parts, but not always. I'd much rather not break them in the
first place.

Tim O'Connor


Re: ORER QUESTION

Tim O'Connor
 

Yes, that's right Brian. That's why I didn't write "ex-PRR X31c". :-)

Tim

DTI 12128
From series 12000-12399 built 1937, these are PRR X31c round roof
box cars
I think these were just clones of Pennsy round roof box cars, and never owned by PRR. The trucks under these cars were Self-Aligning Double Truss Spring Plankless with Coil-Elliptic spring package (a favorite truck of DT&I's) and not PRR's 2D-F12 coil-elliptic truck.

Tahoe Model Works's new Coil-Elliptic truck is a close match, if you don't mind the spring plank detail.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

112481 - 112500 of 197060