Date   

Re: Hopper Car with box car roof

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

This is one of the few Sunshine mini-kits included in the price list. It's
kit # M.1, 2 radial roofs, hatches, and a few other bits, plus decals for
$30. See the last page of the new prices list. It's used with the Bowser
triple hopper.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com



Hi,
I'm looking for 2 or 3 sets of Sunshine kit M1 MINI. These were 2 ATSF
covered hopper roofs & parts for conversion of Stewart 3-bay hoppers to ATSF
grain cars.

The Sunshine catalog says these were/are only available at meets, and as I
live in Australia, sadly I don't see myself attending one of those anytime
soon.

If you have any that are surplus to needs please email me at
davenorth at optusnet dot com dot au and let me knowwhat you want or them.
Cheers
Dave North




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Athearn Airslide question

cabincar2834 <cwilson@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote

GATC's general practice was to paint the rims of the roof hatches
black, and the hatch covers were often unpainted aluminum.

It's my understanding that the original GATC freight car technical data
(all but tank cars) built at East Chicago, Indiana, still exists but
has not been made available to historians wishing to use the data in
publications or for use in producing accurate scale models. If anyone
knows how to gain access to this information (presumably at the current
GATX railroad car leasing company), I would be very glad to hear from
you. My intent is to follow up the Vol. 17 article with articles on the
GACX 42000-series cars leased to railroads and private companies.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins
Thanks Ed - I knew this would be the right place to ask. The photo I am looking at shows the hatch cover edges barely visible and they appear to be black. Having the rest of the hatch covers "gray" to represent unpainted aluminum really makes them stand out though.

I do not have the article you referenced but will try to find it. My research into records for the Ann Arbor indicates that they had 10 of these cars leased from 1955(?) until the end of Wabash control (1963-64). After that there were two leased Airslides in essentially the same paint scheme but with DT&I-style compass heralds in place of the pennant.

Craig Wilson

If this posts more than once I appologize. My server is giving me some headaches today.


Re: Polyester shim material

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

Thanks for those thoughts Dennis. I wouldn't use the word "agonizing" to
describe my thought the process - I think its fun to think through options,
consider obstacles and potential challenges, and then build. That said, I
have built myself into a corner on this one already.

I had a look at the 1922 CBC Royalite tank drawing and photos - they are in
the Trains Shed Cyclopedia No.12 as well, p.268 (i.e. about 8 pages in from
the front cover). The car in the drawing has a similar situation with
overlapping courses to the car I am modelling. It is tough to see a joggle
in the drawings however. Wouldn't shop drawings help! One interpretation
issue: I think the outer layer of the tank shown in the drawing at cross
section A-A shows the tank anchor band. But if so, it is rendered in a
confusing fashion as the drawing simply ends in a taper rather than
continuing to the frame. Perhaps I am misinterpreting it.

Rob,

I agree that the sectional views in the Cyc drawing are pretty much worthless. I was basing my statements on the way the lap is drawn in the elevation. The edge of the center course is shown as two parallel lines, then a couple rivet spaces from the bottom sheet, one line angles into the other. The draftsman is obviously trying to show us that there is something going on here, but not exactly what.

I looked through my tankcar pix last night, and find the only radial course cars I have are both UTLX cars. I've uploaded a photo of UTLX 12283 at the Mid-Continent Ry Museum (more here):

http://www.midcontinent.org/collectn/stlfrt/utlx12283.html

This photo is the best I have that illustrates the area we are discussing:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/2015799527/pic/list

You will note that the bottom sheet is three pieces on this car, and also note that the laps are plain laps, but the corner of the sheet is formed to jog out over it's mate where they both have to lap to the upper tank course. You'll also note that the edge of the sheet tapers toward the corner, as if the sheet was sheared square, rolled, and when the lap was offset outward, there was no extra material to keep the edge in a straight line.

Note also that the edge of the bottom sheet swells outward where the course seams go behind it. I'm of the opinion that none of this would show even in the fab drawings of the individual plates; the plates were simply sheared square, punched, rolled, and fitted up as best they could, then partially riveted. The corners were then heated and beaten until they laid flat, then drawn up with the final rivets. Crude, but it got the job done.

I alluded to this fit-up problem when we were discussing boxcar lap seams, where I made the statement that the "offset" lap seams made fit-up easier. What we are looking at here is the exact same situation as the top and bottom corners of boxcar side sheets. People who model plain laps tend to lay the sheets at an angle, like shingles, but that's not how the prototype does it, On the prototype, the bottom of each sheet rivets solidly to the side sill, and when it comes to the end that laps over the next sheet, it needs to be given a little kink to lay flat. Boxcar sheets are thin enough that a couple whacks with a three pound hand sledge ought to be enough to do the trick, but these tankcar sheets are another matter entirely. Fit-up is going to require some serious persuasion.

Dennis


Re: Hopper Car with box car roof

stevelucas3 <stevelucas3@...>
 

Dave--

With what the costs and time required might be to ship the parts that you need to Australia, and then the time and effort to modify them to suit the hopper car, have you considered cobbling the roof up out of sheet and strip styrene? If it's only one car that you need this roof for, it shouldn't be too hard a fabrication job.

I found it easy to make a flat panel roof for an IMWX car this way while at a train show, so it'd be a little more work to make a Hutchins radial roof. The key seems to be to make some fixture to hold the curve in the roof while adding the ribs and intermediate stiffeners. Or heat-form some heavy sheet styrene for the base of the roof in the oven on low heat, while your significant other is out of the house? :)

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Rich C <rhcdmc@...> wrote:

Dave,
 
Those mini kits are listed in their July 15th, 2009 numeric list, which means they are available directly. They are $30 for 2 roofs. Overseas shipping is $39!!
 
Rich C

--- On Thu, 9/10/09, atsfsd26 <davenorth@...> wrote:


From: atsfsd26 <davenorth@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Hopper Car with box car roof
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, September 10, 2009, 3:30 PM


 



Sorry everyone,
I forgot to change the subject line in my previous post. By coincidence, I'm looking for some of the roofs for ATSF hopper cars that Bob was asking about
cheers
Dave

Hi,
I'm looking for 2 or 3 sets of Sunshine kit M1 MINI. These were 2 ATSF
covered hopper roofs & parts for conversion of Stewart 3-bay hoppers to ATSF grain cars.

The Sunshine catalog says these were/are only available at meets, and as I live in Australia, sadly I don't see myself attending one of those anytime soon.

If you have any that are surplus to needs please email me at
davenorth at optusnet dot com dot au and let me knowwhat you want or them.
Cheers
Dave North



















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Hopper Car with box car roof

Rich C
 

Dave,
 
Those mini kits are listed in their July 15th, 2009 numeric list, which means they are available directly. They are $30 for 2 roofs. Overseas shipping is $39!!
 
Rich C

--- On Thu, 9/10/09, atsfsd26 <davenorth@optusnet.com.au> wrote:


From: atsfsd26 <davenorth@optusnet.com.au>
Subject: [STMFC] Hopper Car with box car roof
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, September 10, 2009, 3:30 PM


 



Sorry everyone,
I forgot to change the subject line in my previous post. By coincidence, I'm looking for some of the roofs for ATSF hopper cars that Bob was asking about
cheers
Dave

Hi,
I'm looking for 2 or 3 sets of Sunshine kit M1 MINI. These were 2 ATSF
covered hopper roofs & parts for conversion of Stewart 3-bay hoppers to ATSF grain cars.

The Sunshine catalog says these were/are only available at meets, and as I live in Australia, sadly I don't see myself attending one of those anytime soon.

If you have any that are surplus to needs please email me at
davenorth at optusnet dot com dot au and let me knowwhat you want or them.
Cheers
Dave North



















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Walthers Decals

bnpmodeler
 

Mr. Welch and group;

The Big Little Railroad Shop in Somerville, NJ may have what you seek. Owner
Jan Kuscma will go out of her way to help you find what you need, if it is
at all available; she has a couple of boxes of Walther's, Champ etc. decals
that probably date back to the 50's if not earlier. Give her a call and tell
her Jim Harr sent you.

***********************************

The Big Little Railroad Shop
63 West Main Street
Somerville, NJ 08876
908-685-8892
www.biglittle.com
Tues-Fri 11A - 7P
Sat 11A - 5P

***********************************

Hope this helps!

Jim



Jim Harr
Stella Scale Models
P.O. Box 121
High Bridge, NJ 08829-0121
908-797-0534
www.stellascalemodels.com


Is anyone aware of a hobby shop with a trove of Walthers decals? While I am
aware of their arguable quality, some were of use and Walthers does not make
or advertise them any longer.

Places like Caboose, The Original Whistle Stop, Terminal don't show them but
I that there are some out there somewhere. I did score a couple of sets I
was looking for recently.

Bill Welch


Re: NYC Mineral Brown Paint Suggestion?

golden1014
 

Jason,

In studying color photos of NYC freight cars, it appears to my untrained eyes that most NYC house cars faded to almost a straight tan color. There are enough paint experts on this list that can explain why certain colors shift certain ways. I think the Mineral Brown you suggested looks good, as it appears devoid of any red. It would therefore be easy to "tan it up" if you intened to weather it. Since color is such a subjective topic I'm suere there will be disagreements, but that's the way I see it.

John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "parkcitybranch" <parkcitybranch@...> wrote:

I am having a USRA Boxcar painted for NYC and Westerfield recommends mineral brown. I model 1941 or so. Does anyone have a recommendation for a good mineral brown? I see that testors offers an ATSF mineral brown, will that work for a NYC mineral brown? Thanks for your help.

http://www.testors.com/products/137309



Jason Sanford


Re: Polyester shim material

Robert kirkham
 

While the modelling is very nice, Vince, I can't see how I would be able to do the same. For one thing, multiple overlapping panels is a different challenge; for another, I use my airbrush because I have to - not because I'm particularly good at it. Still a great idea for other purposes....

Rob Kirkham

--------------------------------------------------
From: "VINCE PUGLIESE" <gigitreosei@rogers.com>
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2009 11:15 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Polyester shim material

Have you considered building this up with successive coats of primer?Check out the work on this Polikarpov I-16, specifically the ribbed effect on the tailplane:
http://hsfeatures.com/i16type5as_1.htm
.vp


--- On Wed, 9/9/09, Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca> wrote:

From: Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca>
Subject: [STMFC] Polyester shim material
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Received: Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 1:01 AM



















I'm working on a tank car model, and want to add tank courses that are

slimmer than the .005" styrene sheet available from Evergreen. I feel the

thickness is an issue especially when modelling areas where multiple

overlapping radial courses are themselves overlapped by another sheet. On

tanks with a horizontal lower course and radial upper courses, this

situation is often found along the long horizontal seam at the top edges of

the lower course.



I have considered using Bare Metal Foil, but it is a product largely unknown

to me and I am not confident of my ability to paint it and keep the paint

from scratching off over time. I also think its a bit too slim for the

purpose. I prefer to use something closer to styrene if there is a viable

alternative.



To that end, I wonder whether anyone on list has used the various plastic

shim materials sold by McMaster-Carr. I do not see thin styrene, but they

include polyester sheet materials in several thicknesses that are slimmer

than .005" styrene. If you have used the polyester sheet, I'd like to hear

what you thought of it, including:



- does it have a smooth finish suitable for modelling a steel panel?



- how does it work with glues? and



- how do model paints adhere to it?



For example, will solvent type cement bond it to styrene? Alternatively,

what about CA?

Can any of you suggest another product that might fit the purpose better?



Thanks in advance



Rob Kirkham




































------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: New Photos at the Newberry Library?!

al_brown03
 

Try:

http://collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_nby_rrlife.php?CISOROOT=/nby_rrlife

This is the front page of "Daily Life Along the Chicago Burlington and Quincy". Note that the link wraps.

-- hth --

-- Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

-- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

A CB&Q friend told me last night that a message had appeared within
that group recently that a large number of photos had appeared on the
Newberry Library website recently, related I think to Chicago. Has
anyone heard about this and can anyone provide a link to it. I could
not get the NL search function to work.

Bill Welch


New Photos at the Newberry Library?!

Bill Welch
 

A CB&Q friend told me last night that a message had appeared within that group recently that a large number of photos had appeared on the Newberry Library website recently, related I think to Chicago. Has anyone heard about this and can anyone provide a link to it. I could not get the NL search function to work.

Bill Welch


Re: Polyester shim material

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for those thoughts Dennis. I wouldn't use the word "agonizing" to describe my thought the process - I think its fun to think through options, consider obstacles and potential challenges, and then build. That said, I have built myself into a corner on this one already.

I had a look at the 1922 CBC Royalite tank drawing and photos - they are in the Trains Shed Cyclopedia No.12 as well, p.268 (i.e. about 8 pages in from the front cover). The car in the drawing has a similar situation with overlapping courses to the car I am modelling. It is tough to see a joggle in the drawings however. Wouldn't shop drawings help! One interpretation issue: I think the outer layer of the tank shown in the drawing at cross section A-A shows the tank anchor band. But if so, it is rendered in a confusing fashion as the drawing simply ends in a taper rather than continuing to the frame. Perhaps I am misinterpreting it.

The model I am building is of the CPR's 12000 US gallon 389000-389049 series tank cars used for company fuel service. A good friend started out by noticing all of the similarities to the Athearn single dome tank, and so I was going to try a kitbash. After spending some time at it, I felt I'd rather spend the time going a little further as there were a number of compromises with the Athearn tank. So the "kitbash" involves me cutting off the tank ends from the Athearn car (very easy to do) and rolling a basic tank body of .010" styrene (its thicker in between the tank ends).

It came out well, but I have to put the next courses on top. That .010" lap joint over the ends really looks good. Hence the feeling I've built myself into a bit of a corner!

I can add some thickness to the model, but not a lot more without effecting the look of the car from the end. Like the Royalite car, the CPR car has three radial courses above the long horizontal course. The radial courses nearest each end have a seam at the top of the tank. Looking at the end of the tank, a thin wrapper for the one half of the radial course can run from about 7 o'clock to just past midnight. The .010" tank body already in place can serve as the other half of the radial course from 12 o'clock to 5 o'clock. Then the bottom course overlaps the bottom edge of both halves of the radial course at 7 and 5 o'clock. I want the combination of those layers to look good. Using .005" may work, and as of tonight I am going to try it with some test pieces.

I have to admit that cutting pieces to exactly the right length rather than overlapping them as on the prototype feels like a challenging technique. But I'll try out a few ideas and see.

Rob





--------------------------------------------------
From: "soolinehistory" <destorzek@mchsi.com>
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2009 12:47 PM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Polyester shim material

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

These are all helpful thoughts - thanks very much for the info on Mylar, and
for the reminders about plate thickness on tank cars. The three overlapping
layers of the tank remain a challenge to do well, but perhaps something
other than thinner stock is the answer. Also appreciated the references to
other sources of polystyrene sheet and Tom Madden's neat idea using labels.
Lots for me to chew on.... I had used brass for a previous model but
hadn't liked what I got as the CA had created bumps that held it out of
round a marginal but real amount. That was before Archer rivets and I had
difficulty with the embossed rivets holding too much CA on the undersides
before the joint was made. In the world of Archer rivets that may be easier
to handle - worth trying again.
Rob Kirkham
Rob,

You seem to be agonizing about how to handle the lap seams on a tancar that has "radial" courses, and therefore steps in the diameter, where these steps meet the bottom sheet. The answer lies in a close study of the prototype. There are two basic methods the prototype would use to to handle these three way lap situations, the easier to model is the use of a filler piece sandwiched in the lap of the highest sheet over the lowest. In this situation, the apparent thickness of the bottom sheet would change by the additional thickness of the filler. A close look at photos, however, shows that this is not the case. The other way the prototype would handle this would be to forge an offset or "joggle" on the edge of one sheet, as we were discussing about boxcar sheets a while back. While you are going to say that this is not how tankcar seams were done, keep in mind that there is no reason why the offset needs to run the whole length of the seam. It was quite common to only press it in near the edge of the sheet, allowing the steel's elasticity to blend it into the sheet at large further away from where it was needed. Indeed, this is exactly what the general arrangement drawing of the CC&F built "Royalite" tankcar shown in the 1922 CBC appears to show, although the general arrangement drawing doesn't detail it; one would need the shop drawings for forming the sheet to see exactly what was done.

So, to build this car, I would be inclined to model the bottom sheet with .020" styrene, the larger dome course with .015" styrene butted to it, and the end courses with .010" styrene butted to it, and shimmed out .005" where it abuts the .020" bottom sheet, the last little bit of the edge that butts against the dome course could have it's edge beveled slightly to indicate that it bends towards the inside of the tank to fit behind the dome course.

Sure wish I had a radial course tankcar handy to photograph this detail; it would make explaining it a lot easier.

Dennis




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Walthers Decals

Brian Carlson <brian@...>
 

As one of the few people who still decal cars here in WNY, I've been given
many old Walthers, Champ, Hearld King, and CDS dry transfers. What set are
you looking for I may have it.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2009 11:44 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Walthers Decals

Is anyone aware of a hobby shop with a trove of Walthers decals? While I am
aware of their arguable quality, some were of use and Walthers does not make
or advertise them any longer.

Places like Caboose, The Original Whistle Stop, Terminal don't show them but
I that there are some out there somewhere. I did score a couple of sets I
was looking for recently.

Bill Welch



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Hopper Car with box car roof

atsfsd26 <davenorth@...>
 

Sorry everyone,
I forgot to change the subject line in my previous post. By coincidence, I'm looking for some of the roofs for ATSF hopper cars that Bob was asking about
cheers
Dave


Hi,
I'm looking for 2 or 3 sets of Sunshine kit M1 MINI. These were 2 ATSF
covered hopper roofs & parts for conversion of Stewart 3-bay hoppers to ATSF grain cars.

The Sunshine catalog says these were/are only available at meets, and as I live in Australia, sadly I don't see myself attending one of those anytime soon.

If you have any that are surplus to needs please email me at
davenorth at optusnet dot com dot au and let me knowwhat you want or them.
Cheers
Dave North


Re: Polyester shim material

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

These are all helpful thoughts - thanks very much for the info on Mylar, and
for the reminders about plate thickness on tank cars. The three overlapping
layers of the tank remain a challenge to do well, but perhaps something
other than thinner stock is the answer. Also appreciated the references to
other sources of polystyrene sheet and Tom Madden's neat idea using labels.
Lots for me to chew on.... I had used brass for a previous model but
hadn't liked what I got as the CA had created bumps that held it out of
round a marginal but real amount. That was before Archer rivets and I had
difficulty with the embossed rivets holding too much CA on the undersides
before the joint was made. In the world of Archer rivets that may be easier
to handle - worth trying again.
Rob Kirkham
Rob,

You seem to be agonizing about how to handle the lap seams on a tancar that has "radial" courses, and therefore steps in the diameter, where these steps meet the bottom sheet. The answer lies in a close study of the prototype. There are two basic methods the prototype would use to to handle these three way lap situations, the easier to model is the use of a filler piece sandwiched in the lap of the highest sheet over the lowest. In this situation, the apparent thickness of the bottom sheet would change by the additional thickness of the filler. A close look at photos, however, shows that this is not the case. The other way the prototype would handle this would be to forge an offset or "joggle" on the edge of one sheet, as we were discussing about boxcar sheets a while back. While you are going to say that this is not how tankcar seams were done, keep in mind that there is no reason why the offset needs to run the whole length of the seam. It was quite common to only press it in near the edge of the sheet, allowing the steel's elasticity to blend it into the sheet at large further away from where it was needed. Indeed, this is exactly what the general arrangement drawing of the CC&F built "Royalite" tankcar shown in the 1922 CBC appears to show, although the general arrangement drawing doesn't detail it; one would need the shop drawings for forming the sheet to see exactly what was done.

So, to build this car, I would be inclined to model the bottom sheet with .020" styrene, the larger dome course with .015" styrene butted to it, and the end courses with .010" styrene butted to it, and shimmed out .005" where it abuts the .020" bottom sheet, the last little bit of the edge that butts against the dome course could have it's edge beveled slightly to indicate that it bends towards the inside of the tank to fit behind the dome course.

Sure wish I had a radial course tankcar handy to photograph this detail; it would make explaining it a lot easier.

Dennis


Re: Polyester shim material

VINCE PUGLIESE
 

Have you considered building this up with successive coats of primer?Check out the work on this Polikarpov I-16, specifically the ribbed effect on the tailplane:
http://hsfeatures.com/i16type5as_1.htm
.vp

--- On Wed, 9/9/09, Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca> wrote:

From: Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@live.ca>
Subject: [STMFC] Polyester shim material
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Received: Wednesday, September 9, 2009, 1:01 AM













 





I'm working on a tank car model, and want to add tank courses that are

slimmer than the .005" styrene sheet available from Evergreen. I feel the

thickness is an issue especially when modelling areas where multiple

overlapping radial courses are themselves overlapped by another sheet. On

tanks with a horizontal lower course and radial upper courses, this

situation is often found along the long horizontal seam at the top edges of

the lower course.



I have considered using Bare Metal Foil, but it is a product largely unknown

to me and I am not confident of my ability to paint it and keep the paint

from scratching off over time. I also think its a bit too slim for the

purpose. I prefer to use something closer to styrene if there is a viable

alternative.



To that end, I wonder whether anyone on list has used the various plastic

shim materials sold by McMaster-Carr. I do not see thin styrene, but they

include polyester sheet materials in several thicknesses that are slimmer

than .005" styrene. If you have used the polyester sheet, I'd like to hear

what you thought of it, including:



- does it have a smooth finish suitable for modelling a steel panel?



- how does it work with glues? and



- how do model paints adhere to it?



For example, will solvent type cement bond it to styrene? Alternatively,

what about CA?

Can any of you suggest another product that might fit the purpose better?



Thanks in advance



Rob Kirkham

































[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Railway Prototype Cyclopedia

rwitt_2000
 

FYI, for those needing back issues there are several volumes of RPCyc;
vols. 12-17 except for vol. 15, posted on eBay by the same vendor. The
vendor currently has many other titles.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=380157249594&ssPageNa\;
me=ADME:B:SS:US:1123

Bob Witt


Re: Walthers Decals

David Sieber
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Is anyone aware of a hobby shop with a trove of Walthers decals? While I am aware of their arguable quality, some were of use and Walthers does not make or advertise them any longer.

Places like Caboose, The Original Whistle Stop, Terminal don't show them but I that there are some out there somewhere. I did score a couple of sets I was looking for recently.

Bill Welch
Bill,

Last year, I found stocks of Champ and some Walthers decals in two shops: Al's Hobby Shop in Elmhurst IL, and Berkshire Hills Hobby Supply in Canaan CT (just up from the classic Canaan station). That trip, I picked up about 40 decal sets, mostly box car, tank car, and Airslide decals not available for many years, nor ever made by anyone other than Champ or Walthers. You could also try Bruce's Hobby Shop in Sacramento CA.

Admittedly, these brands may be of arguable quality compared to later offerings (thinfilm stock, computer typefaces and artwork, specific rather than generic datasets, etc.). However, long-out-of-production Champ and Walthers decals often are the only source of lettering for less-common cars such as the ASARCO early riveted PS-1 (see RPCyc 1), Tidewater Southern "cornucopia" 50-foot PS-1 box car, Tydol-Veedol two-dome tank car, Montgomery Ward semitrailer, or NP Pig Palace. The thick film of old Walthers and Chanp decals is a mixed blessing - clunky, but lasts for decades; as Champ advertised, use a 50-year-old decal right out of the envelope and it goes on perfectly, instead of disintegrating into little bits . . .

Hope this helps,
Dave Sieber, Reno NV


Re: Hopper Car With Box Car Roof

Scott Pitzer
 

Why would a grain car be marked for return empty to San Bernardino, California? (Not exactly "the breadbasket of the U.S.A.")

The image on the link below is from the Kansas Memories collection of the Kansas State Historical Society.

The image (taken between 1941 and 1945) is described as, "A view of an Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railway hopper car at the shops in Topeka, Kansas. The hopper car was modified using a box car roof and had a main function of carrying grain."

http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/51171


Re: Walthers Decals

Charlie Vlk
 

For that matter, does anyone on the list know what the disposition of the Walthers Decal line material ended up being?
The entire line was offered for sale a couple of years ago, but just what was offered I don't know. I would assume anything really valuable
(original reference material, inked drawings, etc..) would have been picked over and retained by Walther's R&D department long since.
The value of the early typeset-based decals (Walthers, Champ) is somewhat questionable since the advent of computers has allowed us to
develop very accurate artwork.... there was a great deal of standard typefaces and generic data included in older sets.
The old lines did have one big advantage... they could take photos of steam era freight cars and get source materials from the railroads and
carbuilders, so some of the artwork was very accurate for certain elements of the decals.
Charlie Vlk


Walthers Decals

Bill Welch
 

Is anyone aware of a hobby shop with a trove of Walthers decals? While I am aware of their arguable quality, some were of use and Walthers does not make or advertise them any longer.

Places like Caboose, The Original Whistle Stop, Terminal don't show them but I that there are some out there somewhere. I did score a couple of sets I was looking for recently.

Bill Welch

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