Date   

Re: Interesting book available for download

asychis@...
 

That worked! Thank Derrick

Jerry Michels


Re: Interesting book available for download

asychis@...
 

Same for me, I am in Texas (well, maybe that's the problem!), but there is
no read button.

Jerry Michels


Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19

Ed Hawkins
 

On Oct 7, 2009, at 11:14 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Mark Feddersen wrote:
> Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why
> Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As
> far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car
> and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some
> light on this or is this another Intermountain goof?

I have no idea what color those C&NW roofs may have been, but
I'd sure be surprised if the Viking roofing was not galvanized. That
had been essentially standard since the 1920s and was extensively used
even before WW I.

Mark and Tony,
The Viking roofs on the CNW emergency box cars were indeed galvanized.
Also, I believe InterMountain made a good decision on the roof color
based on available data (see below). InterMountain could have gone the
easier route and painted the roof the same as the rest of the body.
That would have eliminated a masking step and saved cost. Instead, IM
masked the car so that the roof could be painted what is thought to be
a legitimate color based on interpretation of source data by multiple
people, including noted CNW freight car historian Jeff Koeller.

I have the original bill of materials for the CNW cars built by
Pullman-Standard having the Viking roofs. I scanned and sent a copy of
the paint specs to both InterMountain and Jeff so they had actual
documentation from which to base a decision. In the paint
specifications it designates the outside of the roof and running boards
as being painted with two coats of Sherwin-Williams #21572 or equal
Galvanized Roof Paint.

Naturally, the discussion then led to "OK, now what color is
"galvanized roof paint?" Ultimately it was decided that the color
should be a shade of gray somewhat matching that of the galvanized roof
itself. Everyone is free to debate the conclusion, but the decision was
made with a great deal of thought. The sides, ends, and trucks of the
cars received CNW #1 paint "redish-brown in color." Underframes were
coated with black car cement. White stencils.

I have been known to criticize some of InterMountain's models when
think the criticism is valid and deserved, In this case, IF a mistake
in the roof color was made, I wouldn't characterize it "another
InterMountain goof" since a great deal of discussion and thought went
into the decision.

The Viking Roof specification in Pullman-Standard lot no. 5752 called
for roof sheets #16 U.S. Ga. C.B. Galvanized. Standard Railway
Equipment Manufacturing Co. drawing 7R-2650-C. The P-S drawing list
gives the general arrangement drawing no. 58215-C. It's quite possible
this drawing is in the Pullman collection at the Illinois Railway
Museum.

At the same time AC&F built emergency box cars for CNW (and one car for
CMO), and the bill of materials for the galvanized Murphy roofs on
these cars specified them as unpainted. Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mark Feddersen wrote:
Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some light on this or is this another Intermountain goof?
I have no idea what color those C&NW roofs may have been, but I'd sure be surprised if the Viking roofing was not galvanized. That had been essentially standard since the 1920s and was extensively used even before WW I.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19

feddersenmark
 

Speaking of war emergency boxcars, does anybody know why Intermountain chose to paint the roof of their C&NW version gray? As far as I know they were the same box car red as the rest of the car and the Viking roofs were not galvanized. Can anybody shed some light on this or is this another Intermountain goof? Thanks. Mark Feddersen

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@...> wrote:

STMFC Group,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 19, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of October 2009. Volume 19
contains much useful prototype and scale modeling information: 149
black & white and color photographs, 31 diagrams, and 4 tables for a
total of 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

1. Emergency Composite Box Cars by Patrick C. Wider (50 pages). The
article is the fourth in a series that cover American box car designs
that were built in large quantities during the first half of the 20th
Century. The author covers the single-sheathed and plywood-sheathed 40'
and 50' emergency box cars constructed during World War II following
restrictions imposed by the War Production Board.

2. Erie 40-Ton Express Milk Cars by Patrick C. Wider (10 pages). The
author describes and illustrates the unique Erie express milk cars
built during the 1930s by the Greenville Steel Car Company. Also
discussed and illustrated are some of the cars converted for express
baggage service.

3. The Family of All-Welded 70-Ton 52'-6" Drop-End Gondola Cars Based
on PRR's Class G31 by Ed Hawkins (53 pages). The article covers an
interesting group of subject cars first built by the Pennsylvania
Railroad (Class G31) in 1948-1950, followed in the 1950s with
derivatives built by American Car & Foundry and Pullman-Standard for
Pennsy, Atlantic Coast Line, Birmingham Southern, Delaware & Hudson,
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, Southern Pacific, Wabash, Sacramento
Northern, and Western Pacific.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 19. The normal retail price for Volume 19 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $24.00 (postpaid to addresses in the U.S.) -
a 20-percent discount. But here's the catch! Your payment must be
postmarked by October 24, 2009 for this offer to be valid. Mail orders
with postmarks after this date will not be honored.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 19, please send a check or money order in the amount of $24.00
by October 24, 2009 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

Missouri residents must add $1.85 state & local sales tax ($25.85 total
amount).

For single book orders to Canada, please add $5.79, and for single book
orders to all other countries please add $12.28 (Air Mail).

Internet users: Please visit our new web site address:
http://www.rpcycpub.com. A flyer with summary information in PDF format
can be downloaded at: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v19_flyer.pdf

For those attending the Naperville Prototype Modelers Seminar, if you
wish to have your book delivered at the meet, please indicate. We
encourage this option.

Please contact me off-list if you have any difficulties downloading the
PDF or require additional information. We thank you!
Regards,
Ed Hawkins & Pat Wider



Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Vol. 19

Ed Hawkins
 

STMFC Group,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 19, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of October 2009. Volume 19
contains much useful prototype and scale modeling information: 149
black & white and color photographs, 31 diagrams, and 4 tables for a
total of 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

1. Emergency Composite Box Cars by Patrick C. Wider (50 pages). The
article is the fourth in a series that cover American box car designs
that were built in large quantities during the first half of the 20th
Century. The author covers the single-sheathed and plywood-sheathed 40'
and 50' emergency box cars constructed during World War II following
restrictions imposed by the War Production Board.

2. Erie 40-Ton Express Milk Cars by Patrick C. Wider (10 pages). The
author describes and illustrates the unique Erie express milk cars
built during the 1930s by the Greenville Steel Car Company. Also
discussed and illustrated are some of the cars converted for express
baggage service.

3. The Family of All-Welded 70-Ton 52-6 Drop-End Gondola Cars Based
on PRR's Class G31 by Ed Hawkins (53 pages). The article covers an
interesting group of subject cars first built by the Pennsylvania
Railroad (Class G31) in 1948-1950, followed in the 1950s with
derivatives built by American Car & Foundry and Pullman-Standard for
Pennsy, Atlantic Coast Line, Birmingham Southern, Delaware & Hudson,
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, Southern Pacific, Wabash, Sacramento
Northern, and Western Pacific.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 19. The normal retail price for Volume 19 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $24.00 (postpaid to addresses in the U.S.) -
a 20-percent discount. But heres the catch! Your payment must be
postmarked by October 24, 2009 for this offer to be valid. Mail orders
with postmarks after this date will not be honored.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 19, please send a check or money order in the amount of $24.00
by October 24, 2009 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

Missouri residents must add $1.85 state & local sales tax ($25.85 total
amount).

For single book orders to Canada, please add $5.79, and for single book
orders to all other countries please add $12.28 (Air Mail).

Internet users: Please visit our new web site address:
http://www.rpcycpub.com. A flyer with summary information in PDF format
can be downloaded at: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v19_flyer.pdf

For those attending the Naperville Prototype Modelers Seminar, if you
wish to have your book delivered at the meet, please indicate. We
encourage this option.

Please contact me off-list if you have any difficulties downloading the
PDF or require additional information. We thank you!
Regards,
Ed Hawkins & Pat Wider


Re: Interesting book available for download

Aley, Jeff A
 

Maarten,

Google Books cannot be viewed outside of the U.S.A.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Maarten Vis
Sent: Wednesday, October 07, 2009 11:26 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Interesting book available for download



Charlie,
Thanks for the link, but it only gets me the title page PDF.
Can't find the link to the book. Doing something wrong?
Have fuN,
Maarten Vis

Charlie Vlk schreef:
This is a Walter Lucas book that I did not have in my Library (three other titles by him that I do have are 100 Years of Classic Steam Locomotives, Locomotives and Cars Since 1900, and 100 Years of Railroad Cars).
I went to grade school with his son and knew he was an HO Model Railroader and vaguely knew he worked for Simmons-Boardman; wish I'd known more and met him and knew what questions to ask him!!
Charlie Vlk


I ran into this on another forum. This is a Simmons-Boardman book. It's a condensation of material from late '40s S-B Cyclopedias aimed at the hobbyist audience. At a quick look it seems to be a great reference on the state of the art of railroading technology during the ever-popular transition era.

Free pdf download from Google books: http://www.google.com/books?id=ryhSAAAAMAAJ


Re: ACC Applicators

Bill Darnaby
 

I have used nothing but the cheap Duro super glue, $0.99 per tube, that I get at the local hardware store for all of my resin kits. I also assemble them outdoors during humid Indiana summers. Yes, the nozzle tends to clog up. However, I have found a wonderful tool for declogging them. If you have ever had a root canal take a look at the little reamers the dentist uses to clear out the tooth root. They look like tapered twist drills about 1/2 inch long with a plastic handle on the end. They are extremely sharp and come in diameters from .010" to about .060". Both times I was in to see this dentist I asked for some and he gave me a couple of envelops with all diameters.

I just twist one down into the nozzle and pull it out. It neatly takes the CA plug with it. Of course, these things are extremely useful for reaming out all kinds of holes in plastic and brass, yes they are that sharp, in models.

Bill Darnaby


Re: Interesting book available for download

Maarten Vis <railvis@...>
 

Thanks for your help, but the "read" button is missing.
That may well be a Google discrimination against foreign
aliens such as me, a Dutchman.
It happens more often that US sites cannot be opened
by users outside the US.
Send me a copy of the PDF maybe???
Have fuN,
Maarten Vis
Leidschendam, The Netherlands

Ray Breyer schreef:

Go to the top left of the Google page, right under the Google name in color. Click "READ"
Go tot he top right of the page and click "PDF"
Save on your computer.
Regards,
Ray Breyer

--- On Wed, 10/7/09, Maarten Vis <railvis@hccnet.nl> wrote:


From: Maarten Vis <railvis@hccnet.nl>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Interesting book available for download
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 1:25 PM


Charlie,
Thanks for the link, but it only gets me the title page PDF.
Can't find the link to the book. Doing something wrong?
Have fuN,
Maarten Vis

Charlie Vlk schreef:

This is a Walter Lucas book that I did not have in my Library (three other titles by him that I do have are 100 Years of Classic Steam Locomotives, Locomotives and Cars Since 1900, and 100 Years of Railroad Cars).
I went to grade school with his son and knew he was an HO Model Railroader and vaguely knew he worked for Simmons-Boardman; wish I'd known more and met him and knew what questions to ask him!!
Charlie Vlk


I ran into this on another forum. This is a Simmons-Boardman book. It's a condensation of material from late '40s S-B Cyclopedias aimed at the hobbyist audience. At a quick look it seems to be a great reference on the state of the art of railroading technology during the ever-popular transition era.

Free pdf download from Google books: http://www.google.com/books?id=ryhSAAAAMAAJ


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links










------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links







Re: Interesting book available for download

Ray Breyer
 

Go to the top left of the Google page, right under the Google name in color.
 
Click "READ"
Go tot he top right of the page and click "PDF"
Save on your computer.
 
Regards,
Ray Breyer

--- On Wed, 10/7/09, Maarten Vis <railvis@hccnet.nl> wrote:


From: Maarten Vis <railvis@hccnet.nl>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Interesting book available for download
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 1:25 PM


Charlie,
Thanks for the link, but it only gets me the title page PDF.
Can't find the link to the book. Doing something wrong?
Have fuN,
Maarten Vis

Charlie Vlk schreef:
This is a Walter Lucas book that I did not have in my Library (three other titles by him that I do have are 100 Years of Classic Steam Locomotives, Locomotives and Cars Since 1900,  and 100 Years of Railroad Cars).
I went to grade school with his son and knew he was an HO Model Railroader and vaguely knew he worked for Simmons-Boardman; wish I'd known more and met him and knew what questions to ask him!!
Charlie Vlk


   I ran into this on another forum. This is a Simmons-Boardman book. It's a condensation of material from late '40s S-B Cyclopedias aimed at the hobbyist audience. At a quick look it seems to be a great reference on the state of the art of railroading technology during the ever-popular transition era.

Free pdf download from Google books: http://www.google.com/books?id=ryhSAAAAMAAJ


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: ACC Applicators

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

I use the lid from a Pringles can as my palette. I use a corsage pin (ball
end removed) clamped in an Xacto handle as an applicator. For adhesive I use
CA from Tech- Bond http://tech-bond.net/. It's guaranteed fresh and comes in
a bottle with a pin in the cap to seal the nozzle and there are fins on the
inside of the cap to prevent the whole cap from being glued to the bottle. I
think Mike Rose sells a similar product that looks like it uses the same
bottle.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


Re: Bob Smith Industries

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I always smile at the name of the this company--sounds like one of those bogus industries people have on their layouts, like Fred's Steel Mill or Jim's Oil Refinery.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Interesting book available for download

Maarten Vis <railvis@...>
 

Charlie,
Thanks for the link, but it only gets me the title page PDF.
Can't find the link to the book. Doing something wrong?
Have fuN,
Maarten Vis

Charlie Vlk schreef:

This is a Walter Lucas book that I did not have in my Library (three other titles by him that I do have are 100 Years of Classic Steam Locomotives, Locomotives and Cars Since 1900, and 100 Years of Railroad Cars).
I went to grade school with his son and knew he was an HO Model Railroader and vaguely knew he worked for Simmons-Boardman; wish I'd known more and met him and knew what questions to ask him!!
Charlie Vlk


I ran into this on another forum. This is a Simmons-Boardman book. It's a condensation of material from late '40s S-B Cyclopedias aimed at the hobbyist audience. At a quick look it seems to be a great reference on the state of the art of railroading technology during the ever-popular transition era.

Free pdf download from Google books: http://www.google.com/books?id=ryhSAAAAMAAJ


Bob Smith Industries

Bill Welch
 

I just logged on to BSI to remind myself of their offerings which are extensive. They have a new 3/4 oz. container with a built-in pin to help keep the nozzle clear and open, which looks good to me.

I usually use small tubes purchased in bubble packs of 6-1o tubes at some place like Home Depot where the stock turns over.

I like these tubes as I can use on up easily before the contents go bad. I use the little "frosted" plastic bags that the detail parts come in as pallets and an insect pin to pick up the glue to transfer to the joint.

I am going to try some of the BSI offerings.

"Lock-Tight" is another brand to investigate. I have had good experience with their shelf lifes.

Bill Welch


Re: ACC Applicators

al_brown03
 

I dispense onto a round toothpick, apply to the model with that.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

I'm with those who don't like the applicator tubes and prefer
using a pin as an applicator. I've been impressed with the Bob Smith
Industries CA packaging, with a tip which doesn't ever seem to clog,
though it's too large to use as an applicator by itself.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ACC Applicators

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I'm with those who don't like the applicator tubes and prefer using a pin as an applicator. I've been impressed with the Bob Smith Industries CA packaging, with a tip which doesn't ever seem to clog, though it's too large to use as an applicator by itself.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: ACC Applicators

Dennis Williams
 

Pierre.
  I sometimes do the same. I found that sometimes you can scratch the hardened ACC off with the back of an X-acto blade and it just snaps off. 
 
Dennis Williams
Munhall, Pa.
www.resinbuilders4u.com

--- On Wed, 10/7/09, pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@sympatico.ca> wrote:


From: pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@sympatico.ca>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: ACC Applicators
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 7, 2009, 9:02 AM


 




Rick,
I don't bother trying to use those tubes/tips that come with the glue. With the rather humid conditions in Southern Ontario I find that they clog up rather quiclly.
I simply dispense a small amount onto a piece of plastic and use a pin to transfer from the puddle to the joint.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "RichardS" <rstern1@... > wrote:

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't seem to work.

Thanks
Rick Stern


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: ACC Applicators

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Rick,
I don't bother trying to use those tubes/tips that come with the glue. With the rather humid conditions in Southern Ontario I find that they clog up rather quiclly.
I simply dispense a small amount onto a piece of plastic and use a pin to transfer from the puddle to the joint.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "RichardS" <rstern1@...> wrote:

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't seem to work.

Thanks
Rick Stern


Re: ACC Applicators

Jack Burgess
 

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips
for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto
the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I
only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this
purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to
run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured
out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills
small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't
seem to work.
The only CA that I use is thin ZAP by Pacer Industries (dark pink bottle). I
buy only the smallest bottles. They come with a Teflon tube which is
inserted in the tip of the bottle after cutting off the "lid" which I throw
away. (The joint between the Teflon and the bottle can leak. The solution is
to get some CA on the joint and then spray it with accelerator which
normally solves the problem.)

We have no humidity here in the Bay Area so I very rarely have the Teflon
tube clog up, even after months of use. If you are continually working, this
setup should be fine. If you are going to stop using the CA for awhile, you
might set the bottle down and tap it a couple of times on the workbench to
get the CA out of the tube and back in the bottle. If you do get a clog, you
can cut off the tip of the Teflon tube to solve the problem.

Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


ACC Applicators

RichardS <rstern1@...>
 

I would like to hear what others are using for applicator tips for ACC glue bottles.

How do you keep them from clogging?

How do you clean them out when clogged?

In particular, I have been using some applicators that fit onto the bottle top. They have a metal tube that is quite small -- I only use them for the thin liquid ACC. They are great for this purpose, giving very good control of the thin glue that tends to run otherwise.

Nevertheless, they clog after a few uses and I haven't figured out any way to clean them out -- I don't have any wire or drills small enough to fit into the tiny tubes and ACC debonder doesn't seem to work.

Thanks
Rick Stern

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