Date   

Re: Friends of the Freight Car Shirts

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Denny Anspach (no doubt with tongue embedded in cheek) wrote:
. . . the Hawaiian shirts are pure Pierre Cardin, as it says clearly on the labels. If I am not mistaken, the FFC shirts are instead labeled something like Joe's Coney Island Tee Shirt & Boiler Shop.
Sirrah! I beg to differ with your frivolity on this matter. All the FOTFC shirts have been good quality cotton shirts from reputable labels for same such as Outer Banks. I can personally vouch for this because I dislike the "waffle weave" type of polo shirt and greatly prefer soft cotton knits, and have always specified same. And far from being tee shirts, they have collars and pockets.
Your disappointment at not having acquired a FOTFC shirt of your own can be remedied next time a batch of them is run <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: When is the grain rush?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dave Evans wrote:
I would assume that large eastern city bakery's would buy the grain when prices were low, and stockpile it while prices remained low, perhaps even carrying inventory into the following year's early harvest period in case prices went high during the initial harvest.
Can I jump in here? I don't know much about the grain business, but do BAKERIES buy grain? I'd assume they buy flour from the milling companies who make it from grain, so what BAKERIES think about grain prices is indirect.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Prototype Police

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 13, 2009, at 5:44 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Fred Freitas wrote:
Stop giving Mike & Jeff new ideas for Coco meet! Be careful
of what you wish for, it may come to pass. How much are non-proto
citations anyway ????
RIchard went as far as having fake police badges made, saying
"Prototype Police," and with the slogan "To Serve and Correct." He
made a great sight in his mirror aviator shades, flashing his badge at
offenders <g>. We started to work on a ticket book but decided we were
pushing the boat out a bit far.
I never considered that the Prototype Police act was especially
appropriate at Naperville or Cocoa Beach, but it might have generated
considerable merriment at NMRA conventions and such. Before we could
carry it further, however, the airline security measures that
followed 9/11 made carrying bogus law enforcement badges, shall we
say, unwise. I still have my badge and ID, though, and might
consider bringing them to an appropriate venue that I can attend by
driving or flying my own airplane. Such as the NMRA national
convention in Sacramento in 2011, perhaps? It might be one way to
find out whether the claims that NMRA officials are now more
receptive to the prototype modeling movement are genuine or just
window dressing.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Those Pesky Offset Twin hoppers

cornbeltroute <cornbeltroute@...>
 

I looked all through my 1953 Car Builder's Cyc and I couldn't find anything that identified the "heap shields" by name <
The term maybe railroad specific as I have seen it used on equipment
diagrams for hopper cars. Some use the term "heap capacity" to describe
the additional capacity over a level load. The B&O used the term
"piling". <<
FWIW, earlier today while perusing a 1943 CBC, a drawing of an AAR Class HM 55-Ton all-steel twin hopper car presented by Enterprise Railway Equipment Co. carried, in part, this description:

"Cubic capacity, 2,139 cu. ft. level or 2,455 cu. ft. with 12 in. average heap."

(So, is this an Enterprise car design, I wonder, or an AAR car design with Enterprise's tag, since Enterprise hoppers and bolsters were used in the drawing? Or something else? . . .)

-Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Lackawanna XM 1950 and 1955

Brian Carlson
 

You can get all the parts from IRC to do it yourself. Alternate doors are
available from Southwest scale models.



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Schuyler Larrabee
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 6:49 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Lackawanna XM 1950 and 1955






Brian, the model is an ELHS exclusive.

SGL

Schuyler, hi,

Just explored the IRC site but I'm not sure . . . might I ask you if this
box car modular model is
exclusive to ELHS, or
does IRC offer the model perhaps as an undec? I'm in the market for the
latter.

Thanks much, Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

. . . Society's latest run of XM cars . . . the combinations of roof,
sides and ends utilized by
Intermountain in
producing this car are correct. . . . This is a great example of combining
modular mold parts. <

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Re: Friends of the Freight Car Shirts

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Because of a power outage I am late to this thread.

Although I am a thorough-going Friends of the Freight Car wannabe (I never got a shirt), I surely support Richard's enlistment of the legions to thank the Loftons for their substantial contribution to this demanding end of the hobby.

Now, I also detected some invidious comments about "the other shirts" seen on the backs of handsome worthies on occasion at both Naperville and Cocoa Beach, i.e. those with the lovely colorful Hawaiian prints . There is a difference: the Hawaiian shirts are pure Pierre Cardin, as it says clearly on the labels. If I am not mistaken, the FFC shirts are instead labeled something like Joe's Coney Island Tee Shirt & Boiler Shop.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Re: When is the grain rush?

devansprr
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Douglas Harding" <dharding@...> wrote:

There was essentially no "grain rush" as we know it today, in the 30's. Farmers fed their livestock the grain, ie corn and oats,
they raised. It was only after WWII and the need to feed the world, along with the advent of hybrid seeds, that grain production
increased and exports were financially viable. That is when the "grain rush" became a part of railroading.


Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org
Doug and Group,

I thought I have read, on this group or perhaps elsewhere, that there was a chronic shortage of box cars during the harvest season - I thought I have seen posts about double-door auto cars being used when the shortage was severe. Perhaps I have mistakenly attributed these situations to include the pre-war era?

There were many grain silos in eastern cities to support local food production (I toured one in Philly in the 60's, and I do not recall it being "new")- one needs to remember that freight movements during the winter months were not always reliable. I would assume that large eastern city bakery's would buy the grain when prices were low, and stockpile it while prices remained low, perhaps even carrying inventory into the following year's early harvest period in case prices went high during the initial harvest.

Bottom line - by definition, if there was a scramble for grain rated box cars, then there must have been a grain traffic surge somewhere. But I think Laramie is west of the bulk of America's "bread basket", so I would expect very different results as the UP main neared Chicago.

Dave Evans


Re: Those Pesky Offset Twin hoppers

rwitt_2000
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

Ed

I looked all through my 1953 Car Builder's Cyc and I couldn't
find anything that identified the "heap shields" by name --
several drawings showed different types of raised ends but
none identified the raised part.

Tim O'Connor
Tim, Ed and others,

The term maybe railroad specific as I have seen it used on equipment
diagrams for hopper cars. Some use the term "heap capacity" to describe
the additional capacity over a level load. The B&O used the term
"piling".

Bob Witt

Bob Witt


Re: Those Pesky Offset Twin hoppers

Rich Yoder
 

Heap shields were referenced in the book "Freight car Equipment of the
Chesapeake and Ohio railway August 1, 1937" by Carl Shaver. Originally
published by the C&O in 1937 by General Superintendant of Transportation
J.W. King. I never saw reference to heap shields "Styles" other than in this
publication. Radial Arch, Oval notch, Angular peak, were all terms used by
the C&O. Dreadnaught reinforced or Corrugation reinforcement and a
reference of "bib" extensions are mentioned.

Rich Yoder

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 5:58 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Those Pesky Offset Twin hoppers

Ed

I looked all through my 1953 Car Builder's Cyc and I couldn't
find anything that identified the "heap shields" by name --
several drawings showed different types of raised ends but
none identified the raised part.

Tim O'Connor



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Colored pencils

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Derwent are more chalky.

SGL

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Clark Propst
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 5:00 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Colored pencils



What's a good type of colored pencil to use for freight car weathering. The ones I have a too
waxy.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa










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Re: Lackawanna XM 1950 and 1955

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Brian, the model is an ELHS exclusive.

SGL


Schuyler, hi,

Just explored the IRC site but I'm not sure . . . might I ask you if this box car modular model is
exclusive to ELHS, or
does IRC offer the model perhaps as an undec? I'm in the market for the latter.

Thanks much, Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa

. . . Society's latest run of XM cars . . . the combinations of roof, sides and ends utilized by
Intermountain in
producing this car are correct. . . . This is a great example of combining modular mold parts. <




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Re: W&LE gondola

Mark
 

Ouch!!! I model the mid fifties. Thanks for the information, Ray. Might have to put it in the things to do group.
 
Sincerely, Mark

--- On Wed, 10/14/09, Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] W&LE gondola
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2009, 8:19 AM


 





Bought a InterMountain USRA composite gondola.
W&LE #51720. This car looks good but is it
right?
Any suggestions?
Thanks, Mark Morgan
Hi Mark,

The W&LE had 1000 USRA composite gondolas, 51000-51999, built by Pullman and Standard Steel in late 1919. The Wheeling began converting these cars to all steel gons in mid-1929 (numbered 51000-S - 51999-S) and into all-steel low-sided gons (57000-57120) in 1938, with the last composite cars dropping off the roster by April 1940. When the cars were rebuilt they lost their diagonal side bracing.

The lettering and colors of the Intermountain model match the 1926 in-service photo that I have of these cars (down to the road number). I believe the ends are wrong on the model; photos that I have of the rebuilt cars show flat ends with two horizontal z-bar ribs, while I think the Intermountain cars come with corrugated ends.

Hope this helps!
Ray Breyer



















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Colored pencils

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 14, 2009, at 2:00 PM, Clark Propst wrote:

What's a good type of colored pencil to use for freight car
weathering. The ones I have a too waxy.
Clark, the ones I use, which work well for me are Prismacolor brand.
I have had the same problem you describe with others.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Those Pesky Offset Twin hoppers

Tim O'Connor
 

Ed

I looked all through my 1953 Car Builder's Cyc and I couldn't
find anything that identified the "heap shields" by name --
several drawings showed different types of raised ends but
none identified the raised part.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Colored pencils

SamClarke
 

Hello Clark,

You can use what is called "water color pencils" that are actually used by sketch and water color artists. I like Faber-Castell, Derwent, and Prismaclor, among others.

Sam Clarke
Kadee Quality Products

----- Original Message -----
From: Clark Propst
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 2:00 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Colored pencils


What's a good type of colored pencil to use for freight car weathering. The ones I have a too waxy.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Colored pencils

CJ Riley
 

--- On Wed, 10/14/09, Clark Propst <cepropst@netconx.net> wrote:





 





What's a good type of colored pencil to use for freight car weathering. The ones I have a too waxy.

Clark Propst

Mason City Iowa


I have used both Prismacolor and CretaColor Fina Art Pastel 
with good results.CJ Riley


Re: Tide Water tank car, TWOX 3050

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 14, 2009, at 1:15 PM, rwitt_2000 wrote:

From a slide on eBay, this appears to be a Tide Water tank car, TWOX
3050, that has been converted from a three compartment into a single
compartment based upon the flanges on the top of the tank. There is no
date when the slide was taken.
This car was originally built as an 8,000 gal. single compartment
GATC Type 30. Apparently Tidewater converted it to a three
compartment car by adding internal bulkheads (note the rivet courses
for these) and additional domes, then converted it back to a single
compartment car by plating over the openings for the additional domes
(the center dome appears to be original). Conversions from single to
three compartment cars were more common than is generally recognized,
but conversions back to single compartment cars weren't common.

Richard Hendrickson


Colored pencils

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

What's a good type of colored pencil to use for freight car weathering. The ones I have a too waxy.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Those Pesky Offset Twin hoppers

cornbeltroute <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Brian, I discussed these types of cars in RP CYC Volumes 1, 2, 4, 8, 9, and 13. Another two-part article was published in Railmodel Journal about the time when the Kadee model was being released (June and Aug. 2006). <
Ed, thank you. I've got the first four RP Cycs.

Cross-checking with your roster in Vol. 1, I see that the 1943 CBC has nine photos of these cars plus four drawings, three of which might or might not be relevant. I'll study your articles to find out.

It's a great way to learn, checking references while an interesting thread is underway.

-Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Tide Water tank car, TWOX 3050

rwitt_2000
 

From a slide on eBay, this appears to be a Tide Water tank car, TWOX
3050, that has been converted from a three compartment into a single
compartment based upon the flanges on the top of the tank. There is no
date when the slide was taken.

Bob Witt

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=380166651780&ssPageNa\;
me=STRK:MEWAX:IT

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