Date   

Re: NYC freight car lettering

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 23, 2009, at 6:21 AM, Brian J Carlson wrote:

Al: I wasn't sure of the date the reporting marks changed so I
didn't want
to assume anything. Hopefully someone on here knows for sure.
Brian, the earliest photos I have of NYC cars with the extended
Gothic stenciling show two box cars with reweigh/repaint dates of BG
(Beech Grove) 6-55. They were taken by Will Whittaker on the West
Coast and George Sisk in Kansas City, and it's a good guess that what
prompted both photos of otherwise very ordinary NYC cars was that it
was the first time the photographers had seen the new lettering style.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Grab Iron tool

KP <kpratt1937@...>
 

" The first you cut in the shape of a (politically incorrect term coming) Christmas tree."
Reading this brought to mind Christmas of 1958, my new wife and I had just moved to
Loa Angeles, CA in Sept. With Christmas coming up my cousin and her husband asked
us if we wanted to ride along to the railroad yards to pick out each of us a "Chanukah
Bush", that was the first time I heard that term.

K. Pratt


Re: Grab Iron tool

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

I now recall that I used "V-Groove" siding to make my "branches" and did not
have to do any additional scribing but now that I think of it, it might not
be a bad idea for the most common sizes. Speaking of which, I ran a fine
point permanent marker running it through the most common sizes to make
them. You will have MANY more slots than you would typically use so some
trial and error is necessary to "zero in" on the "standard" sizes the first
time, or you can cheat and just lay a preformed grab in the slots until you
hit the right one.



I would recommend making this a "narrow and tall tree" which will give you
smaller increments in width as you go from slot to slot. You can add to the
number of increments by using the smaller slot spacing.



I just checked Walthers' site and a sheet of .020 V-Groove siding costs only
$5.49 versus $90 for a CNC manufactured tool and I know that you will have
more increments with the homemade tool.



Allen Cain


Re: Canadian tank cars south of 49; also, Coutts, Montana

Frank Valoczy <destron@...>
 

Thanks all for the clarification of the location of Coutts; I guess it`s
too much to expect of an Albertan archive to know what towns are in
Alberta. The photo shows the cars in a siding that appears to be a
loading-unloading dock; does anyone know where I might find more info
about Coutts-Sweetwater? (I`d have put a slash between the town names but
my laptop decided to change the keyboard layout...)

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC

Tim O'Connor wrote:


Coutts is in Alberta; Sweetgrass MT is the other side of the border.
The route is Great Falls-->Shelby-->Calgary (GN+?) via Coutts/Sweetgrass.


Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


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Another Gentle Abrasive Material

Bill Welch
 

Another gentle abrasive material are pulverized walnut shells. I remember seeing a show about repairing and upgrading Army and Marine HUMVEE's and they were using this material to remove paint. I have seen them advertised or carried by someone, maybe Harbor Freight.

Interestingly such things as fountain pens nibs are polished by being tumbled in walnut shells.

Bill Welch


Re: Canadian tank cars south of 49; also, Coutts, Montana

Tim O'Connor
 

Coutts is in Alberta; Sweetgrass MT is the other side of the border.
The route is Great Falls-->Shelby-->Calgary (GN+?) via Coutts/Sweetgrass.

Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Small Screws was IM 70T Flat

rdgbuff56
 

The best place I found for small screws is Micro-Fasteners.com
Check out their on-line catalog.

I have two of their original kits for this car. I remember I put them back in storage because I didn't know exactly where and which way to place the tie-downs. I think that what they were called. I couldn't find a drawing in the instructions I had. Does someone have a good photo?

Francis A. Pehowic, Jr. in Sunbury, Pa.




________________________________
From: Andy <eandyjr1@verizon.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, November 23, 2009 9:37:40 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: InterMountain 70 ton flat car kits




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@ ...> wrote:

On Nov 22, 2009, at 10:05 AM, William Keene wrote:

I have not seen the 70-ton flat cars yet. What is the method of
installing the couplers on these cars. The experience I had with the
IM reefers with the press fit coupler box cover resulted in removal
of the entire box and installation of new boxes to install the
Sergent couplers. Hopefully the flat car uses some other method than
the press fit coupler box cover.
Bill, the coupler box covers on the IM flat cars are neatly held in
place by small flat head screws.


Richard Hendrickson
Have been using a countersink to make 2-56 flat head screws fit flush on the cover. Also tap the old pin hole for 2-56s. BTW McMaster-Carr & others are a good source for small screws at much better prices than your LHS.



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Christmas tree shipments - was Grab Iron tool

Robert kirkham
 

They were also shipped in box car loads. Around here, the arrival of the first load of the year was even announced in the press as heralding the Christmas season. I've occasionally thought it would be fun to model one of those events at the station in wet Vancouver with Christmas decor starting to show in the town, but the technological challenges of doing so in HO make it difficult, and the quirky unusualness about such a scene make it something I wouldn't touch except as a diorama.

Rob Kirkham
Surrey, B.C.

--------------------------------------------------
From: "steve l" <stevelucas3@yahoo.ca>
Sent: Monday, November 23, 2009 7:53 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re:Grab Iron tool
[snip] in STMFC days, shipped in gondola cars to major cities. An interesting load to model, indeed!
[snip]

Steve Lucas.


Re: Coutts, Alberta (was: Canadian tank cars south of 49)

Ross McLeod <cdnrailmarine@...>
 

Frank - what you may find interesting is that inaddition to CPR traffic interchanged to GN at Coutts/Sweetgrass you will also find CNR traffic (Edmonton...) traffic interchanged to CPR Calgary for GN Sweetgrass.Ross McLeod Calgary

Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC












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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Grab Iron tool

steve l <stevelucas3@...>
 

Jerry--

He's taking a litle poke at poltical correctness. Even Ben Stein has opined on "Christmas" trees in a well-put article. Christmas trees, BTW, were, in STMFC days, shipped in gondola cars to major cities. An interesting load to model, indeed!

As for the grab iron tool, seems to me that Bob Hundman described it in a Mainline article on scratchbuilding an ATSF stock car.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, asychis@... wrote:

"The first you cut in the shape of a (politically incorrect term coming)
Christmas
tree."

Do we really need these sort of comments?

Jerry Michels


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Coutts, Alberta (was: Canadian tank cars south of 49)

al_brown03
 

Coutts, Alberta, is a twin town with Sweetgrass, Montana. It's a significant port of entry to this day. The local railroad is a GN branch that comes up from Virden, just west of Shelby; I don't know where it goes on the Canadian side.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Frank Valoczy" <destron@...> wrote:

<snip>
Speaking of Coutts, MT, what road was that on, was it the GN? I'm not
clear on whether the photo I found of a whole string of Imperial Oil tank
cars there was delivering product or picking up crude, though I'd suspect
the latter.

Frank Valoczy
Vancouver, BC


Re: IC Box Car Color

Rich C
 

I know a late reply, cleaning up my Yahoo folder, but anyhow the RPC #1 by Ed Hawkins suggests Floquil #110179 Mineral Brown. Underframe and Trucks were black.
 
Rich C

--- On Sat, 5/9/09, John Golden <golden1014@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: John Golden <golden1014@yahoo.com>
Subject: [STMFC] IC Box Car Color
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, May 9, 2009, 9:13 PM








Gentlemen,

I'm finishing one of the F&C HO scale IC single sheathed box cars, and I could use some help on the color. Does anyone have any suggestions? Brown? Oxide? Red? A mix? Color of underframe and trucks? Thanks.

John

John Golden
Bloomington, IN



















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: InterMountain 70 ton flat car kits

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Richard, Tom, Andy, and Group,

Thank you for the info regarding the IM coupler box on the 70-ton
flatcar.

Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On Nov 23, 2009, at 6:37 AM, Andy wrote:



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson
<rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Nov 22, 2009, at 10:05 AM, William Keene wrote:

I have not seen the 70-ton flat cars yet. What is the method of
installing the couplers on these cars. The experience I had
with the
IM reefers with the press fit coupler box cover resulted in
removal
of the entire box and installation of new boxes to install the
Sergent couplers. Hopefully the flat car uses some other method
than
the press fit coupler box cover.
Bill, the coupler box covers on the IM flat cars are neatly held in
place by small flat head screws.


Richard Hendrickson
Have been using a countersink to make 2-56 flat head screws fit
flush on the cover. Also tap the old pin hole for 2-56s. BTW
McMaster-Carr & others are a good source for small screws at much
better prices than your LHS.



Re: InterMountain 70 ton flat car kits

Andy <eandyjr1@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Nov 22, 2009, at 10:05 AM, William Keene wrote:

I have not seen the 70-ton flat cars yet. What is the method of
installing the couplers on these cars. The experience I had with the
IM reefers with the press fit coupler box cover resulted in removal
of the entire box and installation of new boxes to install the
Sergent couplers. Hopefully the flat car uses some other method than
the press fit coupler box cover.
Bill, the coupler box covers on the IM flat cars are neatly held in
place by small flat head screws.


Richard Hendrickson
Have been using a countersink to make 2-56 flat head screws fit flush on the cover. Also tap the old pin hole for 2-56s. BTW McMaster-Carr & others are a good source for small screws at much better prices than your LHS.


Re: NYC freight car lettering

Brian Carlson
 

Al: I wasn't sure of the date the reporting marks changed so I didn't want
to assume anything. Hopefully someone on here knows for sure.



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
al_brown03
Sent: Monday, November 23, 2009 9:14 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NYC freight car lettering





Very helpful reference. NYC also changed from Roman to Gothic for reporting
marks and the rest of the lettering, though; Mr. Link's site doesn't address
the date of that (at least in the places I looked).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: NYC freight car lettering

al_brown03
 

Very helpful reference. NYC also changed from Roman to Gothic for reporting marks and the rest of the lettering, though; Mr. Link's site doesn't address the date of that (at least in the places I looked).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Brian J Carlson" <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Tom:

Are you referring to Gothic in the herald? That happened in august 1955
according to Terry Link's site.
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/NYC-MODELS-FREIGHT.htm



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
tmolsen@...
Sent: Monday, November 23, 2009 4:17 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] NYC freight car lettering





List,

Can anyone advise as to when the New York Central went to the Gothic
lettering for freight equipment? My time period and area of choice is PRR
Middle Division Harrisburg/Enola to Altoona in late 1953.

It is a relevant question in as how for every PRR car on the property, there
were a like number of NYC cars at the same time due to the numerous points
on interchange (much to the dismay of the great unwashed number of SPF's).







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: NYC freight car lettering

Brian Carlson
 

Tom:

Are you referring to Gothic in the herald? That happened in august 1955
according to Terry Link's site.
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/NYC-MODELS-FREIGHT.htm



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
tmolsen@UDel.Edu
Sent: Monday, November 23, 2009 4:17 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] NYC freight car lettering





List,

Can anyone advise as to when the New York Central went to the Gothic
lettering for freight equipment? My time period and area of choice is PRR
Middle Division Harrisburg/Enola to Altoona in late 1953.

It is a relevant question in as how for every PRR car on the property, there
were a like number of NYC cars at the same time due to the numerous points
on interchange (much to the dismay of the great unwashed number of SPF's).


Grab Iron tool

SUVCWORR@...
 

That article was in Mainline Modeler but I don't recall the issue and my copies are currently
in storage. The tool works very well and depending on the angle you use, it will allow you to make any wi
width grab iron in small or large increments. The shallower the angle the smaller the steps in width. You
need two pieces of styrene. The first you cut in the shape of a (politically incorrect term coming) Christmas
tree. The trunk becomes the handle. Overlay the branch area with the scribed siding styrene. Then
deepen the scribe lines with either a knife or razor saw. One pass of a saw is usually all that is needed.


Rich Orr

Sometime back one of the magazines ran an article where a piece of sheet
plastic with manufactured scribed slots (siding?) was cut in a triangular
shape with the slots running parallel to the base of the triangle. Then,
you pick the slot that matches the width that you need and lay a piece of
wire in it and simply bend it over the edges of the plastic. Bingo, a grab
iron. The taller the triangle combined with a narrow base gives you a LOT
of slots which vary in length only slightly as you go from one slot to the
next.



I built one of these for a zero cost using scraps from the plastic box and
it works great.



Hopefully my description makes sense.



Allen Cain


Re: Grab Iron tool

asychis@...
 

"The first you cut in the shape of a (politically incorrect term coming)
Christmas
tree."

Do we really need these sort of comments?

Jerry Michels


NYC freight car lettering

tmolsen@...
 

List,

Can anyone advise as to when the New York Central went to the Gothic lettering for freight equipment? My time period and area of choice is PRR Middle Division Harrisburg/Enola to Altoona in late 1953.

It is a relevant question in as how for every PRR car on the property, there were a like number of NYC cars at the same time due to the numerous points on interchange (much to the dismay of the great unwashed number of SPF's).

Best regards,
Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu

96781 - 96800 of 183396