Date   

Re: Coal in the Northwest

Andy Carlson
 

The SP&S coal dock was built in Wishram at the NP's insistence, for the intended use of NP engines, which ended up rarely, if ever, using the Pasco-Vancouver(WA) line. It was torn down years later hardly ever used. After the turn of the Century, the SP&S was an almost 100% oil burning line.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA




________________________________
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Fri, December 25, 2009 8:04:55 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Coal in the Northwest



For shame.... and you live in the Northwest? Tsk tsk. In addition to the
NP, the SP&S was also a substantial user of coal burning locomotives and
had a large coal dock straddling the mainline in Wishram WA.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/25/2009 05:05 PM Friday, you wrote:
I lived in Minnesota from the mid-50s to the early 70's, More than one local
TV news program proclaimed proudly "Here in the Great Northwest". Maybe
that's what confused Tim. False advertising by the TV stations.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon (herein the real Great Northwest)
www.sunshinemodels .com



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Coal in the Northwest

Tim O'Connor
 

Richard, I mention coal sources east of the Rockies because coal
was (and still is) shipped from there to the Pacific Northwest. I
am not afflicted with any geographical disabilities, but you seem
to have substantial gaps in your knowledge no doubt due to your
concentration on railroads of the SOUTH-western United States like
the uh.. what was that name... oh yeah the Santa Fe I think it was.

Tim O'Connor

Note that I my reference was to the Northwest. The Pacific Northwest
consists of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Period. Utah,
Colorado, Montana, and Wyoming are in the Mountain West, not the
Pacific Northwest, as understood by everyone who lives out here. As
for North Dakota, it's separated from eastern Oregon and Washington
by 500 miles of Rocky Mountains and Great Plains, and by many more
miles than that from the major population centers in the Pacific
Northwest. You seem to be afflicted with the kind of geographical
confusion about the Western U.S. that is endemic among those who live
east of the Mississippi (and even more so among those who live east
of the Hudson).

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Coal in the Northwest

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

Richard,

One Seattle area railroad did burn coal, the Pacific Coast Railroad which hauled coal from the mines around Black Diamond. It later was acquired by the Great Northern in the 50's.

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:
That's why all the steam locomotives burned oil, and why most
industries were fueled by oil or natural gas.
Fact. I grant that NP steam locos burned lignite (flammable dirt
that only barely qualifies as coal) in extreme eastern Washington.
However, on all of the railroads that served Seattle, Portland,
Vancouver, the Columbia River, and most of the rest of the area,
steam power burned oil.
Note that I my reference was to the Northwest. The Pacific Northwest
consists of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Period. Utah,
Colorado, Montana, and Wyoming are in the Mountain West, not the
Pacific Northwest, as understood by everyone who lives out here. As
for North Dakota, it's separated from eastern Oregon and Washington
by 500 miles of Rocky Mountains and Great Plains, and by many more
miles than that from the major population centers in the Pacific
Northwest. You seem to be afflicted with the kind of geographical
confusion about the Western U.S. that is endemic among those who live
east of the Mississippi (and even more so among those who live east
of the Hudson).

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Coal in the Northwest

gn3397 <heninger@...>
 

Group,
Didn't some states have laws proscribing the use of coal as locomotive fuel during the dry months of the year, in the hopes of minimizing the forest fire danger? I know that the GN was one railroad that designed removable oil bunkers so that tenders could be fairly easily converted between coal and oil as needed.

Also, as time went on, the GN favored oil as a locomotive fuel, mostly due to cost considerations. By the late forties, coal was only used as locomotive fuel in eastern ND and MN. GN went so far as to convert many of their stationary boilers to burn oil, which is described in some detail in my copy of GN's 1949 Annual report. I have seen aerial photos of Williston, ND (the traditional division between Lines East and Lines West on the GN) in 1949, and there is no coaling tower to be seen.

To keep this message somewhat on topic, the GN hauled this bunker oil in a fleet of several hundred company owned tankcars of mixed ancestry.

Sincerely,
Robert D. Heninger
Iowa City, IA


Re: Coal in the Northwest

Tim O'Connor
 

For shame.... and you live in the Northwest? Tsk tsk. In addition to the
NP, the SP&S was also a substantial user of coal burning locomotives and
had a large coal dock straddling the mainline in Wishram WA.

Tim O'Connor

At 12/25/2009 05:05 PM Friday, you wrote:
I lived in Minnesota from the mid-50s to the early 70's, More than one local
TV news program proclaimed proudly "Here in the Great Northwest". Maybe
that's what confused Tim. False advertising by the TV stations.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon (herein the real Great Northwest)
www.sunshinemodels.com


Re: Mail order business for freight cars, etc.

Jared Harper
 

I forgot to mention the Rick Bell of DCC Installs and Sales does not take credit cards, but does give a 20-25% discount.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@..., "Jon Miller" <atsf@...> wrote:

I have done business for many year with Park Varieties. It's owner
Frank Bura and a member of this list passed away a couple of weeks ago.
Frank was a great guy and he will be missed. Which brings me to my
question. Does anyone know of a small home run model railroad business when
I can purchase my freight cars and assorted items I might need.


Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Mail order business for freight cars, etc.

Jared Harper
 

Try Rick Bell at DCC Installs and Sales. I get 99.9% of my model RR supplies from him. His e-mail is dccinstallssales@.... He has a website. He's located in Martinez, GA.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@..., "Jon Miller" <atsf@...> wrote:

I have done business for many year with Park Varieties. It's owner
Frank Bura and a member of this list passed away a couple of weeks ago.
Frank was a great guy and he will be missed. Which brings me to my
question. Does anyone know of a small home run model railroad business when
I can purchase my freight cars and assorted items I might need.


Jon Miller
AT&SF
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax, Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Coal in the Northwest

Tim O'Connor
 

Yep. We already had this discussion several years ago, when someone
noted the presence of Canadian Pacific coal gondolas in consist lists.
And a simple Google search will reveal the location of NP coal docks,
including the very substantial installation in Auburn WA just outside
Tacoma.

Tim O'Connor

Well, actually Richard you are incorrect again. The Northern Pacific,
according to Mr. Warren McGee, a former NP employee and historian
of great respect, has written that the NP had three different coal districts.

The far eastern portion of the railroad was fueled in the steam era by lake
coal carried on return trips by ore carriers. The central part was fueled by
lignite coal from the NP's own mines. And the western portion was fueled
with coal that came from Washington state itself. It was NOT lignite, but
with all honesty, a bituminous of only fair quality when compared to it's
eastern counterparts.

The Northern Pacific burned Washington state bituminous coal well
through the 1940's and into the 50's. Oil fuel for steam locomotives out
of Tacoma, for example, was only to be found on some passenger, and
switching engines in the 1950's. Coal was still the common fuel on most
freight locomotive around Tacoma and Seattle almost to the end of steam.
There are some great articles to be found in the "Mainstreeter", the NPRHA
magazine, about NP steam era freights working out of Tacoma with coal
burning locomotive in the 1950's. And, for whoever is interested, photos
of the NP coal docks in western Washington state, painted in the railroads
distinctive two color scheme.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart
In a very ice covered Woodstock, Ill.

On Dec 24, 2009, at 8:03 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Ahem, Richard. Fact checking is in order. Coal was burned in
locomotives in Washington state, on the NP for example. Coal
was used in the production of cement and no doubt for other
purposes as well. And sources included western Canada as well
as Utah, Colorado, Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota.
Ahem, Tim. I have checked the statements in my e-mail.

I wrote:

In the steam era, most of the relatively little coal used in the
Northwest came from southern Utah.
Fact. Take a look, e.g., at the large number of D&RGW and UCR gons
on the Bieber interchange list. Sure, some coal came from other
sources as well. I did not say otherwise.
I wrote:

Nowhere in Oregon was coal mined in commercial quantities.
Fact. There was not a single coal mine in Oregon producing enough
coal to fill even one hopper car.
I wrote:

That's why all the steam locomotives burned oil, and why most
industries were fueled by oil or natural gas.
Fact. I grant that NP steam locos burned lignite (flammable dirt
that only barely qualifies as coal) in extreme eastern Washington.
However, on all of the railroads that served Seattle, Portland,
Vancouver, the Columbia River, and most of the rest of the area,
steam power burned oil.
Richard Hendrickson


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

The dishwasher here is doing the dishes (my wife refuses to do dishes, so when we redid the kitchen a Kitchen Aid dishwasher was spec'ed and installed... no more doing dishes in the sink!)

We had the standing rib roast for dinner, with a very nice wine (a BV Private Reserve Cab from 1986... I've owned the bottle since Christmas 1990... it's about time it got drunk.) Connie made a nice cherry cheesecake for desert, and it was a nice dinner...

I wonder if BV ever shipped out by rail... the winery (in Rutherford, CA in Napa Valley) is right across the street from the former SP Napa Valley line which is now the route of the Napa Valley Wine Train.

I hope everyone here had a good Christmas... with visions of tank cars dancing in their heads (obligatory freight car content).

Bill Daniels

Tucson, AZ

--- On Fri, 12/25/09, Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

From: Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@...>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car lettering conventions
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, December 25, 2009, 6:52 PM







 













Denny Anspach wrote:
Well, today, I am chef, cook, and bottle washer with my capable son-in-law as assistant- a
Christmas present to Mama. I

made pecan and mincemeat pies yesterday (only Grade B dark maple syrup, and roasted pecans!).
While I relax at the

computer and contemplate decal applications on my STEAM ERA FREIGHT CARS, I absent myself every 30
minutes

to baste the roast . It will be removed from the oven when the core temp reaches 120º, and then
allowed to rest for

awhile until carved at the table.


First, I contributed my famous (not kidding!) scalloped potatoes to my cousin's dinner table last

night, two dishes worth, and none came home with us . . . 8^(



Today, I made our traditional Christmas Day dinner, Beef Bourguignonne, served very simply with rice

and a good green salad. Oh, and some fairly good wine, coffee and sweets.



Both recipes from the Joy of Cooking, but with variations based on ~40 years experience.



I am the cook every day, but haven't washed dishes for decades, a deal I consider as good as it

gets. It gets me out of the kitchen and dining room earlier so I can get to the steam era freight

cars . . .



SGL



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Database version: 6.13990

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Re: Build date of NP 39487?

earlyrail
 

Coal was mined commercially in Washington (state that is)
on the PC railroad (In our period that would be the Pacific Coast, that Penn whatever has yet to happen)
[The PC is the unknown railroad that was merged into the Burlington Northern]

Howard Garner


Re: Coal in the Northwest

switchengines <jrs060@...>
 

Well, actually Richard you are incorrect again. The Northern Pacific,
according to Mr. Warren McGee, a former NP employee and historian
of great respect, has written that the NP had three different coal districts.
The far eastern portion of the railroad was fueled in the steam era by lake
coal carried on return trips by ore carriers. The central part was fueled by
lignite coal from the NP's own mines. And the western portion was fueled
with coal that came from Washington state itself. It was NOT lignite, but
with all honesty, a bituminous of only fair quality when compared to it's
eastern counterparts.
The Northern Pacific burned Washington state bituminous coal well
through the 1940's and into the 50's. Oil fuel for steam locomotives out
of Tacoma, for example, was only to be found on some passenger, and
switching engines in the 1950's. Coal was still the common fuel on most
freight locomotive around Tacoma and Seattle almost to the end of steam.
There are some great articles to be found in the "Mainstreeter", the NPRHA
magazine, about NP steam era freights working out of Tacoma with coal
burning locomotive in the 1950's. And, for whoever is interested, photos
of the NP coal docks in western Washington state, painted in the railroads
distinctive two color scheme.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

In a very ice covered Woodstock, Ill.

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Dec 24, 2009, at 8:03 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:

Ahem, Richard. Fact checking is in order. Coal was burned in
locomotives in Washington state, on the NP for example. Coal
was used in the production of cement and no doubt for other
purposes as well. And sources included western Canada as well
as Utah, Colorado, Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota.
Ahem, Tim. I have checked the statements in my e-mail.

I wrote:

In the steam era, most of the relatively little coal used in the
Northwest came from southern Utah.
Fact. Take a look, e.g., at the large number of D&RGW and UCR gons
on the Bieber interchange list. Sure, some coal came from other
sources as well. I did not say otherwise.
I wrote:

Nowhere in Oregon was coal mined in commercial quantities.
Fact. There was not a single coal mine in Oregon producing enough
coal to fill even one hopper car.
I wrote:

That's why all the steam locomotives burned oil, and why most
industries were fueled by oil or natural gas.
Fact. I grant that NP steam locos burned lignite (flammable dirt
that only barely qualifies as coal) in extreme eastern Washington.
However, on all of the railroads that served Seattle, Portland,
Vancouver, the Columbia River, and most of the rest of the area,
steam power burned oil.
Richard Hendrickson


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Denny Anspach wrote:
Well, today, I am chef, cook, and bottle washer with my capable son-in-law as assistant- a
Christmas present to Mama. I
made pecan and mincemeat pies yesterday (only Grade B dark maple syrup, and roasted pecans!).
While I relax at the
computer and contemplate decal applications on my STEAM ERA FREIGHT CARS, I absent myself every 30
minutes
to baste the roast . It will be removed from the oven when the core temp reaches 120º, and then
allowed to rest for
awhile until carved at the table.
First, I contributed my famous (not kidding!) scalloped potatoes to my cousin's dinner table last
night, two dishes worth, and none came home with us . . . 8^(

Today, I made our traditional Christmas Day dinner, Beef Bourguignonne, served very simply with rice
and a good green salad. Oh, and some fairly good wine, coffee and sweets.

Both recipes from the Joy of Cooking, but with variations based on ~40 years experience.

I am the cook every day, but haven't washed dishes for decades, a deal I consider as good as it
gets. It gets me out of the kitchen and dining room earlier so I can get to the steam era freight
cars . . .

SGL





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Database version: 6.13990
http://www.pctools.com/en/spyware-doctor-antivirus/


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Bill Kelly
 

You are correct. I've seen several of these AAR tank car lettering
diagrams from various years and the underframe is never represented. The
CBC caption says "For Explanatory Notes See Manual,...", there you will
find note 6.

Later,
Bill Kelly


Tony Thompson wrote:
Bill Kelly wrote:
The 1941 AAR Specifications for Tank Cars has a lettering diagram
in appendix C, this is the same drawing that appears in the Car
Builder'sCyclopedias. Note 6 to the diagram states "Car number and
initials to be stencilled on underframe center sills, or side
sills, and on both truck bolsters". No location on the center or side
sills is specified so it may be hard to find.
The drawing in the 1946 Cyc, page 373, does not show anything
about the center sill, Bill.
____________________________________________________________
Weight Loss Program
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Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

The cuisine of our ancestors was definitely not for the weak of diet... most people couldn't afford the luxury of wasting anything. And suet was high in calories, necessary for those winter nights before centralized heating.

Bill Daniels

Tucson, AZ

--- On Fri, 12/25/09, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car lettering conventions
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, December 25, 2009, 5:51 PM







 









Bill Daniels wrote:

It's rare to find meat in any mincemeat pie anymore... I've had
several when a friend of mine was in the grass-fed beef business a
couple of years ago. Karen would take orders for them several weeks
before Thanksgiving. And I believe venison was the traditional meat.
Nowadays, it's usually justraisins and apples... but it's still tasty.


An ingredient of MAJOR proportions in the old-fashioned

mincemeat pie was SUET. Lots of it. Makes that winter dessert stick to

your ribs. <g>



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress. com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturep ress.com

Publishers of books on railroad history

























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bill Daniels wrote:
It's rare to find meat in any mincemeat pie anymore... I've had several when a friend of mine was in the grass-fed beef business a couple of years ago. Karen would take orders for them several weeks before Thanksgiving. And I believe venison was the traditional meat. Nowadays, it's usually justraisins and apples... but it's still tasty.
An ingredient of MAJOR proportions in the old-fashioned mincemeat pie was SUET. Lots of it. Makes that winter dessert stick to your ribs. <g>

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Coal in the Northwest

Greg Martin
 

Andy,

Being from So Cal and now living in the Pac Nor West the folks up here do
make the distinction specifically. They include Idaho, Washington, Oregon
and a bit of the coastal areas of Nor Cal as the PNW as well as British
Columbia, further north is simply the Yukon. Just a notation from someone who
moved here and listening to those that have always lived here. I also love
the freight car past that is found here... Salem, Or loaded all kinds of
freight cars during the steam to diesel era (mandatory freight car
requirement)>


Andy Carlson writes:




And Richard, since it seems to be popular sport to go after you, don't you
think that as an English Instructor the phrase "PACIFIC Northwest" is
unnecessarily wordy when "Northwest" will suffice?
-Andy Carlson

________________________________
John Riddell wrote:

Richard,

you wrote

The Pacific Northwest consists of Oregon, Washington, and British
Columbia. Period.

British Columbia is in the Pacific SOUTHwest. The Yukon is in the
NORTHwest.

You seem to be afflicted with the kind of geographical confusion that is
endemic among those who live
south of the 49th parallel. :-)

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

It's rare to find meat in any mincemeat pie anymore... I've had several when a friend of mine was in the grass-fed beef business a couple of years ago. Karen would take orders for them several weeks before Thanksgiving. And I believe venison was the traditional meat. Nowadays, it's usually justraisins and apples... but it's still tasty.

Bill Daniels

Tucson, AZ

--- On Fri, 12/25/09, Jim Hayes <jimhayes97225@...> wrote:

From: Jim Hayes <jimhayes97225@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car lettering conventions
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, December 25, 2009, 5:20 PM

Denny, if you're fussy about how your pecan pies are made, what kind of meat
do you use in your mince(d) meat pie? The best I ever had was made with
venison. Nowadays most mincemeat pies seem to be minced apple & raisin pies.

Jim H.

On Fri, Dec 25, 2009 at 4:11 PM, Bill Daniels <billinsf@...> wrote:



Denny,

Ours came out when it hit 125... half an hour later it was ready to slice
and serve.
And it was perfect... with enough left over for roast beef sandwiches for
days to come. We can get some locally roasted green Anaheim chillies to go
with the sandwiches.

Bill Daniels

Tucson, AZ

--- On Fri, 12/25/09, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...<thompson%40signaturepress.com>>
wrote:

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...<thompson%40signaturepress.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car lettering conventions
To: STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, December 25, 2009, 4:17 PM




Denny Anspach wrote:

While I relax at the computer and contemplate decal applications on
my STEAM ERA FREIGHT CARS, I absent myself every 30 minutes to baste
the roast . It will be removed from the oven when the core temp
reaches 120º, and then allowed to rest for awhile until carved at
the table.
Aw, cut it out, Denny! You're making my mouth water all over my

keyboard!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress. com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturep ress.com


Publishers of books on railroad history



 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Maybe I should arrange to have some of our local (Hatch, NM is just down the Interstate from here) chilies shipped out... via a 40' PFE ice reefer (to keep this on subject).

And we are in the Mountain time zone, just an hour ahead of the Bay Area...

Bill Daniels

Tucson, AZ

--- On Fri, 12/25/09, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car lettering conventions
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, December 25, 2009, 5:20 PM







 









Bill Daniels wrote:

And it was perfect... with enough left over for roast beef
sandwiches for days to come. We can get some locally roasted green
Anaheim chillies to go with the sandwiches.


Boy, is my keyboard getting drenched . . . us Pacific Time Zone

folks haven't eaten yet . . . boy, do those chilies sound great.



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress. com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturep ress.com

Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bill Daniels wrote:
And it was perfect... with enough left over for roast beef sandwiches for days to come. We can get some locally roasted green Anaheim chillies to go with the sandwiches.
Boy, is my keyboard getting drenched . . . us Pacific Time Zone folks haven't eaten yet . . . boy, do those chilies sound great.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tank Car lettering conventions

Jim Hayes
 

Denny, if you're fussy about how your pecan pies are made, what kind of meat
do you use in your mince(d) meat pie? The best I ever had was made with
venison. Nowadays most mincemeat pies seem to be minced apple & raisin pies.

Jim H.

On Fri, Dec 25, 2009 at 4:11 PM, Bill Daniels <billinsf@...> wrote:



Denny,

Ours came out when it hit 125... half an hour later it was ready to slice
and serve.
And it was perfect... with enough left over for roast beef sandwiches for
days to come. We can get some locally roasted green Anaheim chillies to go
with the sandwiches.

Bill Daniels

Tucson, AZ

--- On Fri, 12/25/09, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...<thompson%40signaturepress.com>>
wrote:

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...<thompson%40signaturepress.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank Car lettering conventions
To: STMFC@... <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Date: Friday, December 25, 2009, 4:17 PM




Denny Anspach wrote:

While I relax at the computer and contemplate decal applications on
my STEAM ERA FREIGHT CARS, I absent myself every 30 minutes to baste
the roast . It will be removed from the oven when the core temp
reaches 120, and then allowed to rest for awhile until carved at
the table.
Aw, cut it out, Denny! You're making my mouth water all over my

keyboard!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress. com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturep ress.com


Publishers of books on railroad history





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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