Date   

New Year

Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

A great NEW YEAR < on the tracks > to Everyone !



Marcelo Lordeiro

www.mrcustom.com.br

trens@...

Tel.: +55 21 2273-2758


Happy New Years

Dennis Williams
 

Happy New Years to Everyone!!!
Dennis
Dennis Williams
Munhall, Pa.
www.resinbuilders4u.com


Re: NEWSPRINT

Jim Lancaster
 

--- In STMFC@..., "geodyssey" <riverob@...> wrote:

Isn't there a huge rail-served Times printing plant in Santa Ana or Costa Mesa, visible just north of the I-405?
Yes. I drove by it about two weeks ago and there were five or six boxcars spotted at the dock.

Jim Lancaster


Re: Coal: Pre-1900 list?

water.kresse@...
 

Is there a freight car list that specializes in post-Civil War to pre-WW1 coal rail operations?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Allen" <dallen@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 2:46:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Coal: Coos Bay and Vancouver Island

Esteemed colleagues:

I offer the following, hoping for the indulgence of the prosecutor,
judge (no jury) and jailer Mr. Brock.

Abdill, in This Was Railroading, pg 186, has a photo of the Beaver
Hill tipple. It is not particularly small. CBR&E $5 is spotting some
CBR&E coal cars for loading; a loaded car is in the foreground. It is
ToC era. (As a side note, does anybody know where I can find
additional information about these coal cars?) And on pg 186 is a
photo which has a ramp up to one of the bay-side coal dock. Obviously
a commercial venture at that time.

Austin and Dill, in The Southern Pacific in Oregon, have some
discussion about this mine as well. A photo on pg 234, taken in 1914,
shows a coal dock in Marshfield - a single-sided dock like the one in
Two Harbors, MN, but quite a bit shorter, with a covered top. And they
say: "In the summer of 1894 a two-mile branch had been extended west
from Beaver Hill Junction to the Beaver Hill coal mine by the Coos
Bay, Roseburg and Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company. Initially the
coal was hauled to Marshfield for loading onto ships. When the
Southern Pacific obtained control of the Coos Bay, Roseburg and
Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company they intended to use the coal
for locomotive fuel. However, the coal proved to be a poor grade,
unsuitable for locomotives, and the plan, which proved to be an
embarrassment for certain Southern Pacific officials, was dropped. The
Beaver Hill spur was abandoned in November of 1926."

And I do not believe that Vancouver Island Coal has been mentioned.
While initially mined by the original inhabitants of the island
commercial mining didn't start until a bit before 1850 at Fort Rupert
at the northern tip of the island. But the more southerly mines on the
east side of the island were the favored developments, initially by
Robert Dunsmuir in 1850. And these various mines continued in
operation through the steam era. Turner, in Vancouver Islands
Railroads, discusses this quite well.

Many thanks to the data provided by Nelson and the map provided by
Karig; these items present the "modern" (for a 1905 modeler) context
quite nicely.

Dave Allen


New Barber Lateral Motion Truck

brianleppert@att.net
 

A Barber Lateral Motion 50-Ton freight car truck is now available in HO scale from Tahoe Model Works.

The Barber Lateral Motion Device used steel rollers and a roller seat between the springs and special bolster to provide a little side-to-side movement of the car body to the truck, resulting in a smoother ride and reduced wear to wheel flanges, journals and couplers. John C. Barber invented this device and formed the Standard Car Truck Company in the late 1890s to market arch bar trucks with this feature. It was later applied to Andrews, T-Section Bettendorfs, Vulcans and eventually ARA trucks with one-piece U section sideframes--what our hobby has called a "bettendorf".

The spotting feature for trucks with the BLM device is the narrow horizontal roller seat casting located between the top of the springs and the truck bolster. Examples may be seen in Richard Hendrickson's truck article in Railway Prototype Cyclopedia #4, Figs. 1, 6, 7, 10, 12, 19 and 42. Fig. 23 is the BLM device adapted to a Barber S-1 truck, in this case with a modified spring package for NYC's LCL Pacemaker service. Fig. 15 is actually, I believe, a rare Symington Lateral Motion truck.

More photos of trucks with the BLM device can be found in Richard's truck article in the Feb. '90 issue of Railmodel Journal, #1, 6, 8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21 and 22.

Drawings of trucks with The Barber Lateral Motion Device can be found in these Car Builders' Cyclopedias: 1922(pages 608, 609), 1925(pages 606,607), 1928(pages 776,777), 1931(pages 766, 768, 769), 1937(pages 912, 914), 1940(pages 1123, 1138) and 1943(page 1096).

U-section trucks with this feature were manufactured from the early 1920s to the late 1930s. Railroads that fully embraced this style of truck included ATSF, B&O, CB&Q, CP, C&NW, DL&W, IC, NP, RI, SL-SF, SP, T&NO, UP and WP. Also PFE and SFRD.

CN, CV, CogG, C&EI, Erie, GTW, MP and T&P all had some cars with Barber Lateral Motion trucks, as well as a few cars owned by C&O, Wabash and Western Maryland.

For most of these railroads, purchases of Barber Lateral Motion trucks ended with the Great Depression. However, B&O, CB&Q and CP continued buying them into the later parts of the 1930s.

The shape of sideframes varied greatly, as was typical of trucks of that period. The prototype trucks for TMW's offering have sideframes cast by American Steel Foundries in the 1940s for both SP and UP. These were actually replacement sideframes for older trucks, most likely T-section Bettendorfs.

Prototype research was conduted at the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Carson City, NV and at the Western Pacific Railroad Museum at Portola, CA.

Flyers for these new HO trucks are still available. Please contact me OFF-LIST at

brianleppert@...

Rob Adams should soon be posting the new flyer and order form on steamfreightcars.com . You can also find info of all of Tahoe Model Works trucks there, listed under Modeling, and then Detail Parts.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


Coal: Coos Bay and Vancouver Island

David Allen
 

Esteemed colleagues:

I offer the following, hoping for the indulgence of the prosecutor,
judge (no jury) and jailer Mr. Brock.

Abdill, in This Was Railroading, pg 186, has a photo of the Beaver
Hill tipple. It is not particularly small. CBR&E $5 is spotting some
CBR&E coal cars for loading; a loaded car is in the foreground. It is
ToC era. (As a side note, does anybody know where I can find
additional information about these coal cars?) And on pg 186 is a
photo which has a ramp up to one of the bay-side coal dock. Obviously
a commercial venture at that time.

Austin and Dill, in The Southern Pacific in Oregon, have some
discussion about this mine as well. A photo on pg 234, taken in 1914,
shows a coal dock in Marshfield - a single-sided dock like the one in
Two Harbors, MN, but quite a bit shorter, with a covered top. And they
say: "In the summer of 1894 a two-mile branch had been extended west
from Beaver Hill Junction to the Beaver Hill coal mine by the Coos
Bay, Roseburg and Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company. Initially the
coal was hauled to Marshfield for loading onto ships. When the
Southern Pacific obtained control of the Coos Bay, Roseburg and
Eastern Railroad & Navigation Company they intended to use the coal
for locomotive fuel. However, the coal proved to be a poor grade,
unsuitable for locomotives, and the plan, which proved to be an
embarrassment for certain Southern Pacific officials, was dropped. The
Beaver Hill spur was abandoned in November of 1926."

And I do not believe that Vancouver Island Coal has been mentioned.
While initially mined by the original inhabitants of the island
commercial mining didn't start until a bit before 1850 at Fort Rupert
at the northern tip of the island. But the more southerly mines on the
east side of the island were the favored developments, initially by
Robert Dunsmuir in 1850. And these various mines continued in
operation through the steam era. Turner, in Vancouver Islands
Railroads, discusses this quite well.

Many thanks to the data provided by Nelson and the map provided by
Karig; these items present the "modern" (for a 1905 modeler) context
quite nicely.

Dave Allen


Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Paul:



LA Times owned Publishers Paper Co. in Portland OR. This is where their
newsprint came from by the trainload.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Paul
Catapano
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 9:54 AM
To: Steam_Era
Subject: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





C. 1952

Was much newsprint produced in the US?
Or had it's production moved to Canada?

Paul Catapano


Re: NEWSPRINT

Greg Martin
 

Rob,

If memory serves me correct, it is the Herald Examiner plant. I can check tonight as I have an SP "Spins List" booklet for that area at home from the 80s.

Greg Martin

-----Original Message-----
From: geodyssey <riverob@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, Dec 31, 2009 7:12 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NEWSPRINT




Isn't there a huge rail-served Times printing plant in Santa Ana or Costa Mesa, visible just north of the I-405?

When I was switching on the UP back in the late 70s-early 80s, a midnight job would take four 100-ton boxcars of paper three or four times a week to a Times printing plant via a switchback behind the DART warehouse. I think this plant printed phone books. An NW2 with a running start and sanding would not always be able to push two cars up the steep grade. Back up and take another run...

Rob Simpson

--- In STMFC@..., "Paul" <buygone@...> wrote:

Tim:



Not entirely true. The LA Times does not have a direct rail siding. Most
of the newsprint was received at the Southern Pacific's 8th Street paper
dock and trucked to the Times paper plant. They also received a portion via
water at the LA Harbor and that newsprint was also trucked to them.



Paul C. Koehler






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: NEWSPRINT

Dave Owens
 

My newspaper, The Hartford Courant, gets paper via the old CV and
sometimes at our siding on Amtrak's New Haven-Springfield line.

Most of the paper comes via the old CV and is transloaded at Monson,
Mass. into trucks for the final trip to the printing plant on the
first floor of our building in Hartford. Every once in a while,
though, I see a car or two on the siding.

I rarely see the NSC newsprint cars on the Hartford line so I don't
know what they're doing in New Haven. Maybe they're getting it by
truck too. The Waterbury Republican-American used to have regular
delivery of newsprint cars by Guilford (as regular as Guilford service
can be), although I don't know what the situation has been the past
few years.

What several folks have said about the importance of proper handling
is true. Although huge and heavy, rolls of newsprint are quite
fragile. And with the focus of using every bit of paper as can be used
in order to save money, divits in rolls and damaged ends are a huge
no-no.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, CT

.



--
2010 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
June 4-5, 2010 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com


Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

SUVCWORR@...
 

Tim,

According to the NRHS website TRAX was first added in 4/54 by ART.

http://www.nrhs.com/reporting_marks/aar_reporting_marks.htm

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thu, Dec 31, 2009 12:06 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)


Gene, you've made me wonder about the relative sizes of Swift,
Armour and Wilson. (To say nothing of Oscar Mayer, et al)

Looking at fleets, in 1953 there were

4000 SRLX (Swift) reefers
= 3747 ARLX (Armour) reefers
= 1469 WCLX (Wilson) reefers

However I'm not sure if there were other reporting marks used
by these companies. I have later 50's photos of Armour TRAX cars
for example. I can't pinpoint when they began using the TRAX mark.

Tim O'Connor



At 12/30/2009 11:01 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Thanks to all who answered. Your answers were about what I expected but, since
I really didn't know, I thought I would ask. My layout would likely only see
the occasional Wilson reefer. Swift and Armour will be more frequent visitors.

Just received a new, unused Jack Sprat label which will be scanned for a sign
or two on Western Grocers in Marshalltown.

Again, thanks to all.
Gene Green


------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: NEWSPRINT

cornbeltroute <cornbeltroute@...>
 

Joel,

Marty remarked on the Central Vermont's newsprint operation. For several years I have been reading the Boston & Maine list, too (BM_RR). If you search the archives there, can't imagine you won't find paper mill postings.

Model Railroad carried a detailed, two-part article on a New England paper mill. Perhaps Andy or Marty will correct me if needed, but I recall it centered on a B&M serviced industry at Berlin, N.H.:

* An industry you can model, part 1: Papermaking and the railroads
Model Railroader, October 1998 page 100
("MCGUIRK, MARTY", PAPER, PROTOTYPE)

* An industry you can model, part 2: Papermaking and the railroads today Model Railroader, November 1998 page 90
An industry with great kitbashing potential
("HEDIGER, JIM", PAPER, PROTOTYPE)

If my memory serves me well, Marty presented an N scale layout based on this mill, Jim an HO layout based on same. (I saved both articles, came across them recently, but think I can find them now? Nooooooo.)

I don't recall its name, but the printing plant just 10-12 miles north of Kalmbach's Waukesha offices is monstrously huge. Man, it's big, big, big. But, you're looking for a 1950s operation. I think the above MR articles would help you a lot.

Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Hopper train lines

bob_karig <karig@...>
 

I have just posted a copy of the brake arrangement drawing for the 50-ton, twin AAR Standard hopper car in the photo section. Unfortunately, I didn't copy the 70-ton version, but it should follow the 50-ton practice pretty closely.

Bob Karig

--- In STMFC@..., "Clark Propst" <cepropst@...> wrote:

Does the train line run along the outside of the frame on a AAR offset 3 bay hopper? (Like Stewart/Bowser and Accurail) If so, on which side of the car. I have a 3/4 photo of one car taken from the A end. It's not on that side of the car.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


NEWSPRINT

Paul Catapano
 

C. 1952
 
Was much newsprint produced in the US?
Or had it's production moved to Canada?

Paul Catapano

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Hopper train lines

bob_karig <karig@...>
 

All of the photos I have show it running down the right side of the car. (The right side of the car is on the right when you're looking at the "B" end of the car.)

Bob Karig

--- In STMFC@..., "Clark Propst" <cepropst@...> wrote:

Does the train line run along the outside of the frame on a AAR offset 3 bay hopper? (Like Stewart/Bowser and Accurail) If so, on which side of the car. I have a 3/4 photo of one car taken from the A end. It's not on that side of the car.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa



Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Rob:



The LA Times had/has many plants in the greater LA Basin. Each used for a
different purpose. The main paper with the news was only printed at the
main downtown plant where all of the editorial staff also worked. Other
plants printed the Sunday funnies, Phone books, advertising supplements,
want ads etc. All but the downtown plant were rail served.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
geodyssey
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 7:13 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NEWSPRINT





Isn't there a huge rail-served Times printing plant in Santa Ana or Costa
Mesa, visible just north of the I-405?

When I was switching on the UP back in the late 70s-early 80s, a midnight
job would take four 100-ton boxcars of paper three or four times a week to a
Times printing plant via a switchback behind the DART warehouse. I think
this plant printed phone books. An NW2 with a running start and sanding
would not always be able to push two cars up the steep grade. Back up and
take another run...

Rob Simpson

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com, "Paul"
<buygone@...> wrote:

Tim:



Not entirely true. The LA Times does not have a direct rail siding. Most
of the newsprint was received at the Southern Pacific's 8th Street paper
dock and trucked to the Times paper plant. They also received a portion
via
water at the LA Harbor and that newsprint was also trucked to them.



Paul C. Koehler


Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Greg:



Bondmen's trailers were all flat bed with steel decks. All rolls were
loaded eye to the sky and bilge (eye to the side). No tie down was used;
the trailers had a set of 2" pipes that set into sockets in the bed at about
2' intervals with a steel cable running around the top. They only had about
10 blocks to go all city street driving. In all probability in locations
that Southern California you might have to do this process differently. The
Times had enough storage capacity at the plant so they did not have to
receive any paper on a rainy day. Bundren only worked for the Times.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
tgregmrtn@...
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 1:13 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Tony replies:


"Paul's description sounded like the rolls were not set down on the dock,
but picked up in the cars and carried to the trucks."

Understood Tony, and that is certainly a good way to do it, less handling
out of car into/onto a truck,. Lets consider the fact the forklifts have
rubber tires, often hard rubber tires for the "boxcar specials". Regardless,

the tires will pick up, transfer and deposit FOD in the trailer and likely
under the next roll of paper your driver has to set down in the trailer.
Many of the photos I have seen of paper transloading from the era we model
show the rolls of paper being loaded onto flatbed trucks with the rolls eye
to the side and braced and blocked. As a matter of fact we often use these
photos in comparison in our Power Point presentations to show that
transloading is not new to any industry. Most roll clamps also have a
turntable
mounted between the mast and the clamp so the driver can lay the roll down
eye
to the side as this is how the roll is handle to the printer. FOD would
cause the paper feeding into the printer (regardless if the damage was on
the
side or edge) to tear over and over again until the hole/tear were gone.

To answer Tim's question paper rolls vary in weight form 5k to 12k
depending on the customer specification. There all qualities of paper from
pulp
board, liner board to photo paper. Photo paper generally requires that the
rolls are set on rubber mats not only in the rail cars, but in the trucks
during distribution as well as in mill/warehouse storage, but not the case
for
news print, which normally only requires it is set on red rosin paper or
pulp board.

Greg Martin


Re: NEWSPRINT

John Riddell <jriddell@...>
 

Joel,

Published statistics show that in 1950 Canadian railways originated a total
of 3,599,329 tons of newsprint. A majority of this would have been exported
to U.S. customers in 40' boxcars of CNR, CPR and to a lesser extent ONR

There were numerous mills in communities in northern Quebec and northern
Ontario. An example was the major mill of Spruce Falls Power and Paper
Company in Kapuskasing ON - a company town. Spruce Falls was the Canadian
affiliate of Kimberly Clark Corp. which owned 51%. The New York Times
purchased 49% of the mill's production. After 1957 the Washington Post
purchased 10% of the production.

Prior to 1962 all Spruce Falls shipments were in CN standard 40' boxcars as
the mill was on a CN line. After 1964 CN had large numbers of purpose-built
50' 70-ton boxcars, with cushioned underframes, built for exclusive
newsprint service.

Rolls were 54" long and were shipped on end.

John Riddell


Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Tim:



The forklift had its own transport and did not follow each load to the
plant; it stayed at the unloading dock until all cars were unloaded. This
forklift had pneumatic tires not the hard rubber tire that most people think
of when thinking of a forklift. At the Times plant they had their own
lift which unloaded the rolls from the trucks rolled them on their side and
placed them on a set of tracks which allowed them to roll down into the
basement for storage or placement on one of the presses. The rolls were
around 4.5 feet in diameter and weighted about 8,000 lbs each if my memory
is working.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 12:18 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Paul

Thanks. Once the truck was full, where did they put the fork lift? :-)

It's not newsprint, but a local box company here stores huge rolls
of brown craft paper outdoors, in the weather. The rolls look like
they weigh many tons. How big was a newsprint roll in the 1950's?

Tim

At 12/31/2009 02:15 AM Thursday, you wrote:
Tim:

Nothing special just a concrete dock with no cover. Rolls were normally
loaded eye to the sky and the trucker in this case Bundren would bring a
fork lift with a roll clamp. Unload the cars, transfer to their trucks, and
deliver to the Times.

Paul



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com
[mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com] On Behalf
Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2009 8:48 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Paul

It sounds like from your description and Andy's that if there
was a specially equipped unloading dock then paper rolls could be
transloaded. But that's far from the suggestion of spotting a
load of newsprint at a "team track". The paper I read in NJ as a
teen (Courier-Post) had no rail service either, so it must have
come from a PRR/PRSL unloading site nearby.

Tim O'Connor

Tim:
Not entirely true. The LA Times does not have a direct rail siding. Most
of the newsprint was received at the Southern Pacific's 8th Street paper
dock and trucked to the Times paper plant. They also received a portion
via
water at the LA Harbor and that newsprint was also trucked to them.

Paul C. Koehler


Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Tony:



You are correct.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 12:08 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Greg Martin wrote:
Paper rolls of any kind require a "paper quality floor" or dock. You
can only imagine what would happen to a roll paper if the surface
that you were unloading on were to create even small holes in the
paper edge or face. So I am sure the dock you are referring to was
a better taken care of then most and likely swept clean before any
carload was unloaded checking for any FOD material.
Paul's description sounded like the rolls were not set down on
the dock, but picked up in the cars and carried to the trucks.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturep
<mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com> ress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: NEWSPRINT

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Greg:



The cars used were in captive newsprint service and yes they did have very
smooth and good floors. The Dock was just a normal concrete dock. Once the
rolls were lifted in the car it went straight to the flatbed truck, it was
never set down on the dock. I don't recall ever seeing any of the Teamsters
sweeping the dock at any time. Bundren had a sizeable fleet of trucks, and
it was not uncommon for them to unload 20 plus cars of newsprint in one day.
From the newsprint dock to the LA Times plant it was about 10 blocks.
Turnaround on the trucks was about 1 hour.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
tgregmrtn@...
Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2009 11:32 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Paul,

Paper rolls of any kind require a "paper quality floor" or dock. You can
only imagine what would happen to a roll paper if the surface that you were
unloading on were to create even small holes in the paper edge or face. So I

am sure the dock you are referring to was a better taken care of then most
and likely swept clean before any carload was unloaded checking for any
FOD material.

Greg Martin

In a message dated 12/30/2009 11:16:27 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
buygone@earthlink. <mailto:buygone%40earthlink.net> net writes:

Tim:

Nothing special just a concrete dock with no cover. Rolls were normally
loaded eye to the sky and the trucker in this case Bundren would bring a
fork lift with a roll clamp. Unload the cars, transfer to their trucks, and
deliver to the Times.

Paul

_____

From: _STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:_STMFC%40yahoogroups.STM> STM_
(mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com)
[mailto:_STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:_STMFC%40yahoogroups.STM> STM_
(mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com) ] On Behalf
Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2009 8:48 PM
To: _STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:_STMFC%40yahoogroups.STM> STM_
(mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com)
Subject: RE: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT

Paul

It sounds like from your description and Andy's that if there
was a specially equipped unloading dock then paper rolls could be
transloaded. But that's far from the suggestion of spotting a
load of newsprint at a "team track". The paper I read in NJ as a
teen (Courier-Post) had no rail service either, so it must have
come from a PRR/PRSL unloading site nearby.

Tim O'Connor

Tim:

Not entirely true. The LA Times does not have a direct rail siding. Most
of the newsprint was received at the Southern Pacific's 8th Street paper
dock and trucked to the Times paper plant. They also received a portion
via
water at the LA Harbor and that newsprint was also trucked to them.

Paul C. Koehler

108041 - 108060 of 195620