Date   

Re: Wilson reefer (bogus?)

Mike Fortney
 

Just to add a tad more to the thickening plot, here's a snip from a post from the J6 group this morning:

"Next, while employed as an assistant trainmaster in 1973 for the C&NW out of Janesville, WI I remember seeing former Wilson Meat reefers repainted in solid red orange, lite yellow and yes baby blue with only WCLX reporting marks and numbers handling meat products for Oscar Mayer out of Madison, WI.

Barry"

Granted this does little to nothing to verify the car's P/L scheme on the eBay auction. I am however, amazed that this "Barry" has the ability to project himself thirteen years into the future (in past tense yet!).
Must be some sort of time traveler....

Mike Fortney

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rockroll50401" <cepropst@...> wrote:

I can't pinpoint when they began using the TRAX mark.

Tim O'Connor

TRAX in 54 and PCX in 57. The 1-2000 ARLX series steel cars new in 49 were rebuilt and renumbered in the late 50s and 60s to 8000 series and I believe a couple other series that slip my mind. Gene's reefer book might say what the others were?
Clark Propst

I have waybills from the mid 60s for Wilson cars shipped out of Albert Lea MN on the IC. The IC used the M&StL yard there, but the RI and MIlW had access to the plant....the plot thickens....


Re: Excellent Clinic at Cocoa Beach

jerryglow2
 

It's Vaughan but my browser found it on the clinic schedule after entering vau (only)

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


What's the correct spelling of Mark's name -- Vaughn or Vaughan?
I've seen it both ways, but usually with the second "a" -- makes
it harder to search for it if I can't spell it.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Prototype Rails and Shake/Take

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

As we speak, and like so many others on this list, I have been busy
packing my Speedo, sun screen, shades, muscle shirts, and sandals,
ready to hit the sun-dappled beach at Cocoa Beach tomorrow. Wow!

Denny S. Anspach MD
Haven't we been threatened with this before? And didn't we decide that when Denny's in a Speedo, "MD" stands for "Moby Dick"?

Tom Madden


Re: Excellent Clinic at Cocoa Beach

Tim O'Connor
 

What's the correct spelling of Mark's name -- Vaughn or Vaughan?
I've seen it both ways, but usually with the second "a" -- makes
it harder to search for it if I can't spell it.

Tim O'Connor

At 1/5/2010 10:36 PM Tuesday, you wrote:
For those coming to Cocoa this weekend, I encourage you to catch Mark Vaughn's clinic. It was one of the best at Naperville.

Bill Welch


Excellent Clinic at Cocoa Beach

Bill Welch
 

For those coming to Cocoa this weekend, I encourage you to catch Mark Vaughn's clinic. It was one of the best at Naperville.

Bill Welch


Southern Milk car lettering

Don Worthy
 

Can anyone shed some light for the lettering on the milk cars the Southern had?
Numbers 3925 to 39XX.
I was given two shots some years ago. They must have been made during the mid to
late 30s.
The two photos show that this group was not all the same type cars. One photo of
3945 shows it to have Ice hatches and a peaked roof. The photo of 3954 does not
have hatches and seems to have a rounded roof.
The Southern and car numbers (left of door) plus what appears to be "capy"???
It looks like 3 lines. I can't make it out.The word Milk is on the Rightside of
the door and some smaller lettering down low on carside. Can't tell what it is,
either.

Also, would there be car number on the ends? anyother end lettering?
I noticed by 1953 there were only 3 cars in service. I wonder if their lettering
had changed with the times like regular freight cars??
Can anyone advise?

Thank you
Don Worthy


Prototype Rails and Shake/Take

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

As we speak, and like so many others on this list, I have been busy packing my Speedo, sun screen, shades, muscle shirts, and sandals, ready to hit the sun-dappled beach at Cocoa Beach tomorrow. Wow!

In this same vein, those attending who have been working on their 2009 Shake/Take UP S-40-10 stock car conversion models should be all means bring what you have. It is with collaborative projects like this that the shared accumulated collective knowledge is far greater than any sum of individual accomplishments. I am hoping that Greg might find some specific time where those working on these models can meet informally and share experiences and ideas.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Re: Arch bar trucks.....

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

Thank you both for putting the arch bar truck info together.
Gene Green


Re: Santa Fe Bx3/6 Brake wheels & gear

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Rick - Yes, That's our kit 3651. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: rdietrichson
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, January 05, 2010 4:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Santa Fe Bx3/6 Brake wheels & gear



Hey everyone,
Did any of the Santa Fe's Bx-3/6's get modernized with AB brake systems, and horizontal brake wheels, or did they remain as built .
with vertical brake shafts?
Thanks for any help.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Santa Fe Bx3/6 Brake wheels & gear

rdietrichson
 

Hey everyone,
Did any of the Santa Fe's Bx-3/6's get modernized with AB brake systems, and horizontal brake wheels, or did they remain as built .
with vertical brake shafts?
Thanks for any help.
Rick Dietrichson
Wilmington, NC


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

Bill Welch
 

Yes, I plan to thoroughly overwhelm and bore people with information about the produce shipping containers, various methods of loading them into freight refrigerator cars, and the colourful labels applied to most crates to seduce/attract the buyers at the various terminal markets.

One of the things people will find interesting, I think, will be that while there were standard containers used, these containers varied across the different regions of the country. For example oranges shipped from California were in a crate somewhat different from oranges shipped from Florida. I am not sure about Texas as yet. Some items shipped in bags from one part of the country and in barrels from another.

Also things changed over time as a result of materials, research and experiments. The USDA was very involved in research to minimize damage and maximize the viability of perishables in transit to the wholesale markets.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, water.kresse@... wrote:



Bill,



Hopefully, these various types of crates and their produce shipped in them will find their way into your box also?  I'm so ready to leave this "wonderful warm weather" up here in Michigan . . . if I could.



Al Kresse


----- Original Message -----
From: "feddersenmark" <feddersenmark@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2010 11:23:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables  shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's  
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives.  The caption reads, "Barrel  
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for  
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931.  (I believe the "boxcar"  
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before.  Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels





Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

water.kresse@...
 

Bill,



Hopefully, these various types of crates and their produce shipped in them will find their way into your box also?  I'm so ready to leave this "wonderful warm weather" up here in Michigan . . . if I could.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "feddersenmark" <feddersenmark@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2010 11:23:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables  shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's  
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives.  The caption reads, "Barrel  
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for  
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931.  (I believe the "boxcar"  
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before.  Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

water.kresse@...
 

I believe a "reefer" is an insulated refrig'd box car?



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----
From: "feddersenmark" <feddersenmark@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, January 4, 2010 11:23:13 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables  shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's  
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives.  The caption reads, "Barrel  
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for  
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931.  (I believe the "boxcar"  
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before.  Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Martin Lofton Status

Rhbale@...
 

In an update last night I learned that Martin's doctors have delayed the
surgery originally scheduled for late December. No firm date has been set
but presumably it will be within the next several days. Meanwhile, Martin is
resting at home and is brainstorming with Tricia on ways to get some
production started without his involvement.

Martin's illness is serious and should serve as a reminder to all of us to
put the macho-man attitude aside and see a doctor regularly.

Richard Bale
Carlsbad CA

In a message dated 1/5/2010 1:40:57 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
tmolsen@UDel.Edu writes:




Ed and Group,

Has anyone heard how Martin has fared since Ed's last report?

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
_tmolsen@udel.tmo_ (mailto:tmolsen@udel.edu)

P.S. Sorry about the previous post, got my fingers crossed up on the
keyboard when attempting to send this post!






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: CNW/CMO Slogan Boxcars

jerryglow2
 

My friend is a CNW modeler convert from narrow gauge interests so to encourage him, I've done artwork for decals for CNW cars for the late steam/early diesel era (although many survived much later in original paint and lettering). You can see 3 on my site at:
<http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/modeling/>

inquiries and info off line please
Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "fltenwheeler" <floridatenwheeler@...> wrote:

Hi

I am looking for information on CNW/CMO slogan boxcars. So far this is what I have found.

April 1976 North Western Lines

April 1981 North Western Lines by Fred Hartwig

Summer 1983 North Western Lines by Clem Devine

December 1986 Prototype Modeler by Lloyd Rinehart

Fall 1996 North Western Lines by Jeff Koeller

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia volume 1 by Pat Wider and Ed Hawkins
_____________________________________________________

The early 1937 slogans. From what I can tell theses slogans were used on both sides of the car.

CMO's ROUTE OF THE 400

CNW's ROUTE OF THE 400 AND THE STREAMLINERS and later changed to just ROUTE OF THE 400
_____________________________________________________

And 5 slogans that started in 1944

THE OVERLAND ROUTE

ROUTE OF THE 400 FLEET

ROUTE OF THE 400 STREAMLINERS

ROUTE OF THE CHALLENGERS

ROUTE OF THE STREAMLINERS
_____________________________________________________


Thanks for any help.

Tim


Re: Martin Lofton Status

tmolsen@...
 

Ed and Group,

Has anyone heard how Martin has fared since Ed's last report?

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@udel.edu

P.S. Sorry about the previous post, got my fingers crossed up on the keyboard when attempting to send this post!


Re: Martin Lofton Status

tmolsen@...
 


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

feddersenmark
 

In addition to working for DuPont in Clinton, Iowa, my father ran a one man insurance agency out of a desk in our dining room for Union Insurance Co. of Lincoln, Nebraska. Every summer for several years in the early 50's, the president of the company would send a gift of about a dozen cantaloupe, presumedly grown near Lincoln, boxed in a crate made of slats about 5" x 1/4" nailed to a 3/4" x whatever top and bottom and re-enforced with wire. They were delivered to our door by the REA and arrived in good condition. I don't know how they were routed from Lincoln to Clinton, but I assume (I know) it was via passenger train (UP/C&NW) in an express car. I always looked forward to their arrival as they were the best. Mark Feddersen

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives. The caption reads, "Barrel
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931. (I believe the "boxcar"
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before. Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels


Re: Arch bar trucks.....

bob_karig <karig@...>
 

With the help of Bill Kelly, I've put together the following sequence of events regarding the prohibition of arch bar trucks in interchange. This information is assembled Rule 3, Section (t) of the Code of Rules Governing the Condition of, and Repairs to, Freight and Passenger Cars for the Interchange of Traffic adopted by the Association of American Railroads for the years indicated.

1931: 3 (t) (3) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, effective January 1, 1936, under all cars. From owners."

1936: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, effective January 1, 1938, under all cars. From owners."

1938, Supplement 2, 3 (t) (4): Effective date of prohibition extended to January 1, 1939

1939: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, effective July 1, 1939, under all cars. From owners."

1940: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited, on and after January 1, 1940. From owners."

1940, Supplement 1: Effective July 1, 1940, "(t) (4) Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars. In
interchange."

1940, Supplement 2, dated July 1940: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars. In interchange."

Note—The movement of cars equipped with arch bar trucks must be confined to owner's rails, except that they are acceptable in interchange from owner for loading or for unloading within the same terminal switching district in which the interchange occurs, providing that no road haul is involved in such movement, and providing that cars so interchanged will be immediately returned to owner's rails when loading or unloading is accomplished.
Cars equipped with arch bar trucks are acceptable for movement between plants located in the same switching district, providing no road haul is involved.
Locomotive cranes, locomotive tenders and derricks, built prior to January 1, 1940 and equipped with arch bar trucks, may be accepted in interchange or from owners prior to January 1, 1941, and moved under such controlled speeds as may be required by handling railroad. Effective January 1, 1941, such equipment will be prohibited in interchange. (This paragraph does not apply to contractors' work equipment other than mentioned above.)

1941: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars, locomotive cranes, locomotive tenders and derricks. In interchange."

Note: The movement of cars equipped with arch bar trucks must be confined to owner's rails, except that they are acceptable in interchange form owner for loading or for unloading within the same terminal switching district in which the interchange occurs, providing that no road haul is involved in such movement, and providing that cars so interchanges will be immediately returned to owners rails when loading or unloading is accomplished.
Cars equipped with arch bar trucks are acceptable for movement between plants located in the same switching district, providing no road haul is involved.

1942-1960: 3 (t) (4) "Trucks, with arch bars, prohibited under all cars, locomotive cranes, locomotive tenders and derricks. In interchange." Minor changes in note with regard to handling cars within switching districts at international border points..

I have also posted this information as a pdf in the file section under the title "Arch Bar History."

Bob Karig


Re: Barrel Crates - How Common Were These?

Bill Welch
 

Although the caption characterizes these as barrels, they are really more like cylindrical crates with slates to promote contact with cool air. I have accumulated several resources related to various forms of shipping containers for produce related to researching the FGE/WFE/BRE companies. What most of us would call and recognize as barrels were used to ship potatoes and apples. Most citrus was shipped in rectangular crates which one publication called simply "Orange and Grapefruit boxes."

Many crops required specifically designed shipping containers while potatoes, for example was also loaded in bulk into reefers and in paper or burlap bags. Peaches moved in specially designed baskets while asparagus were shipped in a box that was shaped like a trapezoid the given vegetables shape once they were bundled and tied together.

Attendees at Cocoa Beach will get a little taste of containers in my presentation there (shameless self-promotion).

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Nolan Hinshaw <cearnog@...> wrote:

On Jan 3, 2010, at 12:15 PM, Bob C wrote:

This image is from the Tampa-Hillsborough County Public Library's
Burgert Brothers Photographic Archives. The caption reads, "Barrel
crates of Pinellas County citrus fruit loaded in boxcar for
shipment: Elfers, Fla. The date is 1931. (I believe the "boxcar"
is actually a reefer.)

http://digital.hcplc.org/burgert/archive09/8263.jpg

I have never seen barrel crates before. Were these very common?
Idunno, but I really appreciated an image illustrating hexagonal
closest packing of circles. Meanwhile the imagination runs rampant
with possibilities for a project I'm working on.
--
Nolan Hinshaw, native Californian since 1944
"[Vista is] about as stable as a one-legged elephant on a skateboard"
C. Daniels

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