Date   

Re: DL&W 53133 40' 1937 boxcar

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

I just finished reading this thread and feel a need to blow my horn here a bit.
I tried using the IM 10' car with their GN+ model's improved ends back in 97-98. I think a photo of my car was in RMJ about 98-99. Beings I built the M&StL version, blt in 52 I used the diagonal panel roof and cut down their PS1 doors.
I bought Martin's version, but was disappointed by the incorrect doors and lack of a Superior hand brake. (In stock again at the CNWHS store?). I built a second car with IM parts for a presentation I did a couple years ago at Naperville. Andy Carlson sold out of the parts afterwards. I may have used that car in an RMC article?

The whole point is that if you really want a specific car, you need to look beyond what the manufacturer intended his parts for.

Clark Propst


Re: Tangent Wabash gons

Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@...>
 

I wrote to Tangent, they said they will rerun them in several months.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: "pierreoliver2003" <pierre.oliver@sympatico.ca>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, March 14, 2010 6:13 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tangent Wabash gons


Schuyler,
There are currently 2 for sale on E-Bay.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Anyone know where some of these are in captivity on dealer's shelves?

Several times I have been too late to the party to get one of these, and I
would like to have one. If you know of a shop that has them, please advise,
off list, please.

Thanks

SGL





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------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Tangent Wabash gons

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Schuyler,
There are currently 2 for sale on E-Bay.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Anyone know where some of these are in captivity on dealer's shelves?

Several times I have been too late to the party to get one of these, and I
would like to have one. If you know of a shop that has them, please advise,
off list, please.

Thanks

SGL





E-mail message checked by Spyware Doctor (7.0.0.514)
Database version: 6.14550
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Re: Caboose Trucks

Jim Hayes
 

This may have already been mentioned but Tichy's caboose truck is "A
BETTENDORF TRUCK WITH TWO LEAF SPRINGS". If not exactly correct, it may do
until the right thing comes along.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com

On Sun, Mar 14, 2010 at 2:08 PM, brianleppert@att.net
<brianleppert@att.net>wrote:



Jim,

Tichy's #3051 Caboose Truck is your best choice for now. It's plastic, with
side frames and bolster molded as one piece.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...>
wrote:

Hi,

Thanks Richard for "the rest of the story".

So the obvious question is ... does any one know of a caboose
truck that is available that represents these 'conversions' as
they were done on the WM/B&O?
The Tahoe Model Works #108 is close - but it still has one
coil spring on either side of the leaf/elliptical spring. If
possible I'd like to find a plastic or brass truck that is
the one that was used on the WM & B&O. The brass trucks that
I have that are a representation of that do not work - as I
have already said - because they tend to dis-assemble in just
normal handling.

So I guess that what I'm looking for is a plastic or brass
truck that is not sprung/equalized ... but that represents
the leaf/elliptical modification to a truck designed for coil.

- Jim


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Caboose Trucks

brianleppert@att.net
 

Jim,

Tichy's #3051 Caboose Truck is your best choice for now. It's plastic, with side frames and bolster molded as one piece.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

Hi,

Thanks Richard for "the rest of the story".

So the obvious question is ... does any one know of a caboose
truck that is available that represents these 'conversions' as
they were done on the WM/B&O?
The Tahoe Model Works #108 is close - but it still has one
coil spring on either side of the leaf/elliptical spring. If
possible I'd like to find a plastic or brass truck that is
the one that was used on the WM & B&O. The brass trucks that
I have that are a representation of that do not work - as I
have already said - because they tend to dis-assemble in just
normal handling.

So I guess that what I'm looking for is a plastic or brass
truck that is not sprung/equalized ... but that represents
the leaf/elliptical modification to a truck designed for coil.

- Jim


Universal Rotary Type brake adjusters for CBQ XM-32c box cars

Mark Heiden
 

Hello everyone,

Does anyone know if CB&Q class XM-32c box cars in the series CBQ 18400-18699 were built with Universal Rotary Type brake adjusters? The other XM-32c box cars in the class, CBQ 18700-19399, did have them, but my photos of cars in the CBQ 18400-18699 series are inconclusive.

Thanks,
Mark Heiden


Re: Caboose Trucks

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

Thanks Richard for "the rest of the story".

So the obvious question is ... does any one know of a caboose
truck that is available that represents these 'conversions' as
they were done on the WM/B&O?
The Tahoe Model Works #108 is close - but it still has one
coil spring on either side of the leaf/elliptical spring. If
possible I'd like to find a plastic or brass truck that is
the one that was used on the WM & B&O. The brass trucks that
I have that are a representation of that do not work - as I
have already said - because they tend to dis-assemble in just
normal handling.

So I guess that what I'm looking for is a plastic or brass
truck that is not sprung/equalized ... but that represents
the leaf/elliptical modification to a truck designed for coil.

- Jim


Re: rivets

ltctilley
 

Hi
I have made rivets and bolts by drilling a hole and putting in a piece of
brass wire with the end peened over a little bit by hitting the end with
something like a small hammer. you get them all lined up and level, then hit
from behind with cyanoacrylate to secure them. really tedious, but it
works.
Chris Tilley


Re: DL&W 53133 40' 1937 boxcar

pennsylvania1954
 

Tim--Now I am confused, too. Why would you want to "to model them the old fashioned way, cutting 6" off a 10'6" box car"? Intermountain has a 10' box: the floor, sides, and inside ends. Postwar 10' cars really can be modeled without a lot of trouble, and you do not have to go to Sunshine.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Greg

I'm a bit confused -- postwar 10 foot cars can be modeled without
a lot of trouble. There are Sunshine kits (NYC/C&O/CRR/DL&W/NH/KCS/
NdeM/D&H/M&StL/D&M/SP/SSW/B&O), and with Intermountain kits or parts
you can model GN/SP&S/SP cars very easily. It's still possible to
model them the old fashioned way, cutting 6" off a 10'6" box car,
as I did years ago with a C&BT shops kit. There's no 10'0" PS-1 --
I'd like those!

Tim O'Connor


Re: Caboose Trucks

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 13, 2010, at 1:00 AM, Jim Betz wrote:

There are several different WM cabeese at the following site. The
particular one that I'm using below has the only close up shot of
just the truck. I can not tell if this is exactly the same as the
others but it is similar to very similar to identical.

http://www.irritatedvowel.com/Railroad/WMRY/Caboose1867/Default.aspx
[snip]

When I look at the pics of the
WM and B&O cabeese it does not look to me like they had
any coil springs in them at all and that they were
'adaptations' of a truck that was designed for coil
springs but using leaf/elliptical springs instead.
Jim, the trucks on the WM (ex-B&O) caboose are double truss self-
aligning spring-plankless trucks of a design built in the late 1930s/
early 1940s by American Steel Foundries. The "ears" with rivets on
either side of the bolster are replaceable wear pads so that
excessive wear between the bolster and side frames can be corrected.
Other photos I have seen of these trucks show them with conventional
coil spring groups, but in these case, as you infer, the coil springs
have obviously been replaced with elliptical leaf springs to improve
the riding qualities on a relatively light car where there isn't a
significant difference between empty and loaded weight.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: HO scale retainer valves

al_brown03
 

31796. (I installed one a day or two back, and the pack is still on my workbench.)

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, rgmodels@... wrote:


In a message dated 3/8/10 9:49:40 AM, timboconnor@... writes:


The most detailed and most easily-handled HO retainer valves are those
sold by PSC.
What is the part number of these retainers?

eric


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: DL&W 53133 40' 1937 boxcar

MDelvec952
 

That link leads us to the famous Homer Hill photo of these cars. That short box ahead of the 52469 is one of the USRA-like steel cars with an odd dreadnaught end, the 47000-series. These cars 8'7" IH cars were unusual in that the ends of the otherwise standard dreadnaught bulges have little tapers to them. A little sanding to Westerfield's USRA box with dreadnaught ends would make an okay stand-in.

The 52469 is in the series preceeding the 53133 model. Yes, the ELHS model is an unusual combination of sides, ends and roof in the industry; was GN the only other road to use this combation of components? DL&W equipped some in this combination for passenger service as express cars, and two of them were outfitted as milk cars. The 52000-series car was offered by Sunshine in two versions, kit 32.11, which Lofton calls "10' IH AAR 1944" boxcars.

As for the 10-foot height -- I've never found any such mention in company writings as yet, but much of DL&W's ladings were of materials that reach weight capacity without requiring the height, such as bagged cement and flour. Yes, many of the later 10'6" cars were assigned to Buffalo-area flour service.

I hope the ELHS will offer the standard 1937 car one day, since the ELHS artwork is terrific and correct in all of the nuances of the era.

Mike Del Vecchio

In a message dated 03/13/10 13:29:00 Eastern Standard Time, eric@hansmanns.org writes:

My eye catches the DL&W car on the far left. It seems to have a 7/7 Murphy end with a gap/spacer in the middle.
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw52469alb.jpg

I admit to a lack of DL&W freight car knowledge. Would this be a steel-side rebuild of a USRA DS clone? Wish we could see a number of that car.

Eric

Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Attend the Central Ohio Prototype Modeler Meet
April 22 - 24, 2010
http://www.hansmanns.org/meet/

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



These cars caught my attention when the ELHS came out with their car, and I
found this photo

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw52469alb.jpg

This car is in the series immediately preceding the one the ELHS chose; it
has a slightly different end. Very straight forward to model with an IM '37
10' box and Branchline ends which need only a little sanding to shorten. The
plate protecting the brake valve is a nice touch.


Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

After cutting out all that irrelevant stuff 8^) . . . VERRRRYY interesting
link, Steve, VERRRY interesting link . . .


SGL





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Re: DL&W 53133 40' 1937 boxcar

Tim O'Connor
 

Greg

I'm a bit confused -- postwar 10 foot cars can be modeled without
a lot of trouble. There are Sunshine kits (NYC/C&O/CRR/DL&W/NH/KCS/
NdeM/D&H/M&StL/D&M/SP/SSW/B&O), and with Intermountain kits or parts
you can model GN/SP&S/SP cars very easily. It's still possible to
model them the old fashioned way, cutting 6" off a 10'6" box car,
as I did years ago with a C&BT shops kit. There's no 10'0" PS-1 --
I'd like those!

Tim O'Connor

Interestingly enough even though it doesn't seem to make the radar screen
of most manufacturers it is not from a lack of trying. Richard has placed
this car in front of most manufacturers over the past few years and no one
has made an attempt to capture this market.

As Richard and I have discussed, you would need two underframe tools, one
for the AAR and the other for the Duryea. The you have the basis for all
the cars, tool the doors separate so you cover all offerings, the two roofs
and the two style ends and you could have a seemingly endless set of
offerings. But as appetizing as this seems there have been no takers. Sadly it is
a huge void in the market. A missed opportunity as well as missed profits.
So we all still wait.

In the meantime we get more F-units, FTs, GPs and the like. I don't think
that we shouldn't have more diesel, no Sir, but this series of cars opens a
lot of doors for a manufacturer to create a core product that will support
the bottom line for a long time. I see that as a big plus for amortizing
the tooling, something that need to be consider even more now.

Greg Martin


Re: DL&W 53133 40' 1937 boxcar

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 13, 2010, at 10:13 AM, Eric wrote:

My eye catches the DL&W car on the far left. It seems to have a 7/7
Murphy end with a gap/spacer in the middle.
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw52469alb.jpg

I admit to a lack of DL&W freight car knowledge. Would this be a
steel-side rebuild of a USRA DS clone? Wish we could see a number
of that car.
Eric, that's actually a 4/4 Dreadnaught end, and the car is one of
the 1,000 cars in the 47000-47699 series (AC&F) and 47700-47999
series (Magor) built in 1929-1930. These were fifty ton steel
sheathed cars with 8'7" inside height, 8 panel sides, and Murphy
solid steel roofs. In dimensions and general construction, they were
very similar to the thousands of Spec. 489 box cars built for the New
York Central System in the 1920s. Almost all were still in revenue
service in 1952, according to the DL&W freight car diagram book.
I'll send you a couple of photos off-list.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: DL&W 53133 40' 1937 boxcar

Eric Hansmann
 

My eye catches the DL&W car on the far left. It seems to have a 7/7 Murphy end with a gap/spacer in the middle.
http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw52469alb.jpg

I admit to a lack of DL&W freight car knowledge. Would this be a steel-side rebuild of a USRA DS clone? Wish we could see a number of that car.

Eric



Eric Hansmann
Chagrin Falls, Ohio
Attend the Central Ohio Prototype Modeler Meet
April 22 - 24, 2010
http://www.hansmanns.org/meet/

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



These cars caught my attention when the ELHS came out with their car, and I
found this photo

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw52469alb.jpg

This car is in the series immediately preceding the one the ELHS chose; it
has a slightly different end. Very straight forward to model with an IM '37
10' box and Branchline ends which need only a little sanding to shorten. The
plate protecting the brake valve is a nice touch.


Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

After cutting out all that irrelevant stuff 8^) . . . VERRRRYY interesting
link, Steve, VERRRY interesting link . . .


SGL





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Re: Flicker Free Circuit

Jim Pickett
 

You are correct about needing the rectifier but let me add to what you said. If we use straight D.C. to operate our trains we are still using A.C. Sounds like a contradiction but lt me explain. Line current A.C. is, within tolerance, 60 cycles per second (in the U.S.). That means the direction of current flow reverses itself regularly 60 times per second. This is what we normally think of as alternating current. The current from our D.C. power supplies alternates in direction also, but not on a regular basis. It "alternates" on an irregular basis at the whim of the person who has his hand on the reversing switch. Electric current, either A.C. or D.C., always flows in one direction; from negative to positive. The only difference in current flow is in which of the two supply wires is positive and which is negative at any given moment. This is determined in the case of A.C. line current by the speed at which the magnetic generator turns and in the case
of our D.C. power packs by the position of our reversing switch. And yes, I know that engineers regard current flow as opposite to electron flow and think current flows from positive to negative but engineers always have been out of touch with reality. If anyone out there is an engineer please forgive the Dilbert moment.


Jim Pickett

--- On Sat, 3/13/10, behillman <chris_hillman@msn.com> wrote:


From: behillman <chris_hillman@msn.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Flicker Free Circuit
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, March 13, 2010, 10:53 AM


 



The bridge-rectifier is necessary if the input is from the track.

In the electronic diagram, the top line always has to be positive, and the bottom line always has to be negative. The bridge always ensures that it is if the input polarity to the bridge is switched, IE) throwing the throttle "reverse" switch in DC, or even setting the car on the track in one direction or the other, DC or DCC.

If the circuit is used with a fixed (unswitchable) power-source, where the input is always the proper + & -, (like in a building - not a RR car) then the bridge isn't needed.

Paul Hillman

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, Jim Betz <jimbetz@... > wrote:

Michael,

The full wave bridge rectifier is small and cheap and, at least
in HO, there is no reason not to use it. And yes, it is why the
circuit works equally well in both DC and DCC.
- Jim
1.1. Re: Caboose Trucks
Posted by: "michaelashelley" mashelley@.. .
Date: Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:22 am ((PST))



That is very similar to a circuit I've used to run an Atlas
turntable motor using DCC track power. I was later told that
the full wave bridge rectifier is not really needed - although
I think it's necessary if you ever ran the caboose on regular
DC track.

Somone else might want to test the circuit without the rectifier,
since it's been a long time since I took Electrical Circuits 2.

Michael A. Shelley







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: DL&W 53133 40' 1937 boxcar

Schuyler Larrabee
 

These cars caught my attention when the ELHS came out with their car, and I
found this photo

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw52469alb.jpg

This car is in the series immediately preceding the one the ELHS chose; it
has a slightly different end. Very straight forward to model with an IM '37
10' box and Branchline ends which need only a little sanding to shorten. The
plate protecting the brake valve is a nice touch.


Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

After cutting out all that irrelevant stuff 8^) . . . VERRRRYY interesting
link, Steve, VERRRY interesting link . . .


SGL





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Re: Tangent Wabash gons

railwayman <stevelucas3@...>
 

Even better, try finding them on a Canadian LHS shelf.

All I want is a Pennsy one.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Anyone know where some of these are in captivity on dealer's shelves?

Several times I have been too late to the party to get one of these, and I
would like to have one. If you know of a shop that has them, please advise,
off list, please.

Thanks

SGL





E-mail message checked by Spyware Doctor (7.0.0.514)
Database version: 6.14550
http://www.pctools.com/en/spyware-doctor-antivirus/


Re: HO scale retainer valves

rgmodels@...
 

In a message dated 3/8/10 9:49:40 AM, timboconnor@comcast.net writes:


The most detailed and most easily-handled HO retainer valves are those
sold by PSC.
What is the part number of these retainers?

eric


Re: Flicker Free Circuit

Paul Hillman
 

The bridge-rectifier is necessary if the input is from the track.

In the electronic diagram, the top line always has to be positive, and the bottom line always has to be negative. The bridge always ensures that it is if the input polarity to the bridge is switched, IE) throwing the throttle "reverse" switch in DC, or even setting the car on the track in one direction or the other, DC or DCC.

If the circuit is used with a fixed (unswitchable) power-source, where the input is always the proper + & -, (like in a building - not a RR car) then the bridge isn't needed.

Paul Hillman

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

Michael,

The full wave bridge rectifier is small and cheap and, at least
in HO, there is no reason not to use it. And yes, it is why the
circuit works equally well in both DC and DCC.
- Jim
1.1. Re: Caboose Trucks
Posted by: "michaelashelley" mashelley@...
Date: Thu Mar 11, 2010 7:22 am ((PST))



That is very similar to a circuit I've used to run an Atlas
turntable motor using DCC track power. I was later told that
the full wave bridge rectifier is not really needed - although
I think it's necessary if you ever ran the caboose on regular
DC track.

Somone else might want to test the circuit without the rectifier,
since it's been a long time since I took Electrical Circuits 2.

Michael A. Shelley

103881 - 103900 of 192760