Date   

Re: Sale of Champ Decals

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tom Olsen wrote:
Connie has officially placed the company up for sale. If the company is not sold, she plans to shut down completely. Hopefully someone will buy the company as a complete shutdown would make it difficult to letter a great many of the freight cars that we currently build. Not always do the decals in many of the kits we buy do the job.
I couldn't agree more, Tom, but in conversations with Connie it is clear that they do not wish to have the business professionally valued, but are simply setting a very high price, based I guess on their personal feelings for how great a business it is (or was). This is common with hobby businesses, where individuals have poured a great deal of themselves into the work and cannot conceive that it might not be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.
This is not to criticize Connie--she has labored mightily in recent years to keep Champ alive, and is certainly entitled to every buck she can get from the sale--but I personally doubt her pricing ideas will find a buyer.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


ACF post-war box cars

Richard Townsend
 

There was a Todd Sullivan article in the Sept. 90 MM on ACF 1948 design box cars. It talks about ACF using a "split panel" roof (as opposed to a rectangular or diagonal panel -- similar to the "Despatch" roof) and "dartnaught" ends on certain cars. The article specifically calls out DT&I 14000-14299 and 14300-14549, MKT 97001-97300 and 97301-97800, and Reading 107500-107999 and 10800 (sic) -108499. It includes plans for MKT 92548 (which is not among those called as being of this particular design). The photos in this article are confusing to say the least. The title illustration has nothing to do with the subject of the article, being ACFX 30000 a 1938 welded demonstrator car (I think). I can accept that since I have no intention of modeling that car. But also included in the photos are the following:

ACL 24000-24999
ATSF 33500-33999
C&EI 66300-64299 (did they count backwards?)
Erie 90500-91199
CMO 38300-39098
ITC 5700-5709
DL&W 54000-54999
RI 23000-23999 and 24000-24999
NKP 20200-20499
PRR 600000-601999 and 602000-603499
Reading ? (showing 109300)
SERX 976-1027
NJI&I 100-199
MKT 91500-92000 (again outside the series called out in the article)

Based on the photos in the article, the DL&W, NKP, SERX, and NJI&I are not among the cars with the dartnaught ends and split panel roof. Looking at Ed Hawkins's article in the 11/90 RMJ, it appears that the Erie cars are out, too, as are the PRR 602000-603499. Another Ed Hawkins article, from the 10/90 RMJ, seems to rule out others (ATSF, C&EI, ITC, and RI 24000 series) since he says they had rectangular panel or diagonal panel roofs.

So here is my question. What 40' box cars did have the combination of split panel roofs and dartnaught ends? I would be pleased to learn that the RI 23000 series cars are among these.

I am contemplating building an example of these cars using Branchline dartnaught ends and a cut-down Despatch roof from a Branchline 50' box car kit.


Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Sale of Champ Decals

tmolsen@...
 

List,

I just placed an order for some NYC freight decals from Champion Decal Company. Connie has officially placed the company up for sale. If the company is not sold, she plans to shut down completely.

There is a summary on the website of what is included in the sale along with photos of the worksite and cabinets. See the website at: http://www.minot.com/champ/

I am sure that all would be interested in this upcoming event. Champ has many decal sets for freight cars that are not available from MicroScale, even though some of the Champ sets are not correct as to size, the majority were undergoing revision when Rich passed away.

Hopefully someone will buy the company as a complete shutdown would make it difficult to letter a great many of the freight cars that we currently build. Not always do the decals in many of the kits we buy do the job.

Best regards,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292 (H)
(302) 740-2897 (C)]
tmolsen@...


Re: interchange (Meat from CGW)

cornbeltroute <cornbeltroute@...>
 

I didn't think the CGW would turn over its meat to the PRR and the NYC. The NKP was a wise choice back in the day. I recall reading about the NKP Berkshires zipping past NYC freights pulled by diesels at points where the NKP and the NYC ran parallel. -Tom <
Tom,

Some of the CGW meat must have gone to the NYC (the question is probably how much, though). There's a photo spread in an issue of MRJ magazine of an NYC P70 PiggyPacker lifting a CGW beaded reefer trailer (#504073) off of an 89ft flat in Boston's Beacon Yard. Gotta assume that came in via the B&A, I'd think. (Have you seen the photos?)

Also, I've wondered about Rath Packing meats and the CGW. For those here who aren't familiar with the subject, Rath was located in the northeast Iowa community of Waterloo, about 25 miles southwest of CGW's hub city, Oelwein.

Waterloo was headquarters for Illinois Central's Iowa Division, which ran hot with lots of meat trains. But, does anyone know if much Rath meat made it onto the CGW? Perhaps north to the Twin Cities or south to Des Moines and Kansas City?

Hmmm. Which reminds me, that during the early 1960s CGW expanded its TOFC ramps to 16 sites, one being its Waterloo yard adjacent to Highland Park. From a tree as a boy, I watched crews bury one end of what I think was a 53-foot flat into the ground at the northeast end of the yard. Did CGW load trailers other than reefers online?

-Brian

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Perishable Schedules

water.kresse@...
 

Bill,



Notice that the Chinchfield and C&O synchronized their Fast Freight numbers . . . even though one went east-west and the other north-south but both actually going northwest-southeast . . . to get fresh veggies up to Chicago.



Al

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bill Welch " < fgexbill @ tampabay . rr .com>
To: STMFC @ yahoogroups .com
Sent: Monday, April 5, 2010 1:55:02 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [ STMFC ] Perishable Schedules

I have been fortunate to scan several "Perishable Schedules"  
published by the ACL , SAL, and L&N and anticipate accessing several  
more including a group published by the Southern soon. I also have  
one from the Charleston & Western Carolina. Many of these were loaned  
to me to scan by collector and dealer Kent Hannah plus my friends  
John King and Jim Singer.

All of these help draw a picture of the way Fruit Growers Express  
traffic moved from the southeast to the major markets of the  
northeast and upper midwest , which involved many other railroads in  
addition to the B&O and PRR (this is not said to diminish the volume  
of either of these RR's ).

A nice example is the relatively simple schedule published by the  
C&WC for train #97 which originated in Augusta, GA (with reefers  
originating from the ACL , SAL and FEC ) and was handed off to the  
Clinchfield at Spartanburg , SC to travel behind their Challengers  
(and later grey & yellow EMD F-5's) to the C&O at Elkhorn City, KY.  
 From here the C&O moved FGE's traffic to:

Buffalo, NY via the NKP
Charleston, VW
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH via the NKP
Detroit, MI via NYC in some cases
Flint, MI
Ft Wayne, IN via the NKP
Fostoria , OH
Grand Rapids, MI
Huntington, WV
Lansing, MI
Saginaw, MI
Toledo, OH
Toronto, ON via CP
Toronto, ON via D&TSL-GT-CN

Another example was part of the schedule from Birmingham, AL for cars  
delivered by the Seaboard Airline

Lv . B'ham 7 PM Wed. via the I.C. to Ar. Chicago 11 PM Thurs.
Lv . B'ham 7:30 PM Wed. via the SL-SF to Kansas City, Ar. Thurs. 4 AM
Lv . B'ham 4 AM Thurs. via the GM&O to Memphis Ar. 8:30 PM  Thurs.

Bill Welch


Perishable Schedules

Bill Welch
 

I have been fortunate to scan several "Perishable Schedules" published by the ACL, SAL, and L&N and anticipate accessing several more including a group published by the Southern soon. I also have one from the Charleston & Western Carolina. Many of these were loaned to me to scan by collector and dealer Kent Hannah plus my friends John King and Jim Singer.

All of these help draw a picture of the way Fruit Growers Express traffic moved from the southeast to the major markets of the northeast and upper midwest, which involved many other railroads in addition to the B&O and PRR (this is not said to diminish the volume of either of these RR's).

A nice example is the relatively simple schedule published by the C&WC for train #97 which originated in Augusta, GA (with reefers originating from the ACL, SAL and FEC) and was handed off to the Clinchfield at Spartanburg, SC to travel behind their Challengers (and later grey & yellow EMD F-5's) to the C&O at Elkhorn City, KY. From here the C&O moved FGE's traffic to:

Buffalo, NY via the NKP
Charleston, VW
Chicago, IL
Cincinnati, OH
Cleveland, OH via the NKP
Detroit, MI via NYC in some cases
Flint, MI
Ft Wayne, IN via the NKP
Fostoria, OH
Grand Rapids, MI
Huntington, WV
Lansing, MI
Saginaw, MI
Toledo, OH
Toronto, ON via CP
Toronto, ON via D&TSL-GT-CN

Another example was part of the schedule from Birmingham, AL for cars delivered by the Seaboard Airline

Lv. B'ham 7 PM Wed. via the I.C. to Ar. Chicago 11 PM Thurs.
Lv. B'ham 7:30 PM Wed. via the SL-SF to Kansas City, Ar. Thurs. 4 AM
Lv. B'ham 4 AM Thurs. via the GM&O to Memphis Ar. 8:30 PM Thurs.

Bill Welch


Re: Train Schedules and the USRA

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jim Dick wrote:
If offense was taken to the use of the word "assertion", I'll stand back, however, were these tesimonials applicable to the USRA time frame? I honestly do not know and that is why I am asking.
I would doubt that they apply on the basis of the personal experience of those PFE people, for obvious reasons, but both the individuals I mentioned had worked for PFE starting in the 1920s. As we know, railroad corporate cultures change quite slowly, and I could well believe that generalizations about most railroad's attitudes would hold up over generations, particularly if restricted to the period covered by this list.

I think it would help clarify that with the car shortages (during the USRA time frame) this thread seemed to start with, the AAR was putting out car orders that did not apply to the private car companies, like PFE, WFE, MDT. These companies or more over, the railroads behind these private car companies could then thumb their noses at the AAR directives. This worked (in cases I have studied regarding the NP) with the UP being able to flood the Yakima area with PFE cars while the NP's own reefers were being diverted to handle crop crisis in California.
The AAR car orders were ordinarily obeyed by railroads as the operation of consensus standards. It had nothing to do with TRULY private companies, say URTX, but railroad-owned ones like MDT or PFE are another matter. From what I know, the railroad owners would have imposed those orders on their subsidiaries--certainly that was the case with SP and UP relative to PFE, You may be thinking of the ICC, which had authority ONLY over common carriers, and thus NOT over the various "private" companies like PFE.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Wine cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 5, 2010, at 8:08 AM, brianleppert@... wrote:

A Chateau Martin car was photographed at Scribner, WA (near
Marshall, near Spokane), the first car in an eastbound Spokane,
Portland & Seattle Ry. freight train. The photo appears in "The
Northwest's Own Railway, vol.1", by Walter Grande.
That's interesting, and a bit puzzling. Eastern Washington today is
a thriving wine-producing region, but in the steam era there were
hardly any wine grapes being grown there. So if that shipment
originated in California, what was its destination? Billings?
Fargo? There wasn't a lot of wine, even cheap wine, being consumed
in that part of the country in those days.

The photo is undated. The lead diesel pulling the train was built
in 1949. The other cars appear to be within our time frame.

Richard, my main interest is Southern Pacific over Donner Pass in
1949. Can I justify one of these awful colored cars in a freight
train of that year? I kinda hope not.
Brian, you could run one if you wanted to, but if you don't, it's not
as though they were as common on Donner Pass as, say, PFE reefers.
At that time, the CMWX entry in the ORERs showed only 25 cars. 5 of
these were non-insulated tank cars which probably didn't stray very
far from the winery; only 20 were the second-hand express reefers
with internal tanks. With a fleet that small scattered between
California and the east coast (and who knows where else, as suggested
by the photo you cite above), no one could regard the non-appearance
of CMWX cars on a Donner Pass layout as a significant omission.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Train Schedules and the USRA

np328
 

In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:> On Apr 2, 2010, at 12:42 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

If offense was taken to the use of the word "assertion", I'll stand back, however, were these tesimonials applicable to the USRA time frame? I honestly do not know and that is why I am asking.

I think it would help clarify that with the car shortages (during the USRA time frame) this thread seemed to start with, the AAR was putting out car orders that did not apply to the private car companies, like PFE, WFE, MDT. These companies or more over, the railroads behind these private car companies could then thumb their noses at the AAR directives. This worked (in cases I have studied regarding the NP) with the UP being able to flood the Yakima area with PFE cars while the NP's own reefers were being diverted to handle crop crisis in California.
Jim Dick


Re: Wine cars

brianleppert@att.net
 

A Chateau Martin car was photographed at Scribner, WA (near Marshall, near Spokane), the first car in an eastbound Spokane, Portland & Seattle Ry. freight train. The photo appears in "The Northwest's Own Railway, vol.1", by Walter Grande.

The photo is undated. The lead diesel pulling the train was built in 1949. The other cars appear to be within our time frame.

Richard, my main interest is Southern Pacific over Donner Pass in 1949. Can I justify one of these awful colored cars in a freight train of that year? I kinda hope not.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

Chateau Martin cars ran in dedicated service from San Martin,
California to New York City.
They may have gone to other destinations as well,
but I know of no evidence for that.

Richard Hendrickson


Express Refrigerator Cars 1929

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

I created a new folder titled Express Refrigerator Cars 1929 which has two pages showing express refrigerator cars under the control of the Railway Express Agency on March 1, 1929. Interesting that both lists are dated 3-1-29 but the one shows additional cars. From the Yakima Valley Transportation Co. records at the Yakima Valley Museum.

Richard Wilkens


Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability

Mark
 

His email: Hobi4u@...

--- On Sun, 4/4/10, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability
To: STMFC@...
Date: Sunday, April 4, 2010, 10:52 PM







 









Mark,



Do you know for certain if he has other sources besides normal distribution

channels? I am not interested in wasting time calling a shop only to get

the answer, "Walthers doesn't have it". I can check the Walthers site

myself.



Ben Hom



From: STMFC@yahoogroups. com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Mark

M

Sent: Sunday, April 04, 2010 9:41 PM

To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com

Subject: [STMFC] Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability



 

Hello, Ben



Did you find your caboose parts? Johns Hobby Shop in Mansfield OH might get

them! 4195264426



Mark Morgan



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "benjaminfrank_ hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Looking for a source for the following parts to model Lehigh Valley
Northeastern cabooses in HO:

Detail Associates 6509 (rectangular end window)
Detail Associates 6510 (porthole end window)
LV 3-tread cast steps
As far as I can tell, the Detail Associates parts are out of production;
Dick Steinbrenner' s article in the August 1982 recommends modifying Quality

Craft Reading cast steps to the LV steps, but these are out of production as

well.

Thanks in advance!
Ben Hom
























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability

Mark
 

He has other channels, just found the AB brake set from someone other than W.

Mark

--- On Sun, 4/4/10, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability
To: STMFC@...
Date: Sunday, April 4, 2010, 10:52 PM







 









Mark,



Do you know for certain if he has other sources besides normal distribution

channels? I am not interested in wasting time calling a shop only to get

the answer, "Walthers doesn't have it". I can check the Walthers site

myself.



Ben Hom



From: STMFC@yahoogroups. com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Mark

M

Sent: Sunday, April 04, 2010 9:41 PM

To: STMFC@yahoogroups. com

Subject: [STMFC] Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability



 

Hello, Ben



Did you find your caboose parts? Johns Hobby Shop in Mansfield OH might get

them! 4195264426



Mark Morgan



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. com, "benjaminfrank_ hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Looking for a source for the following parts to model Lehigh Valley
Northeastern cabooses in HO:

Detail Associates 6509 (rectangular end window)
Detail Associates 6510 (porthole end window)
LV 3-tread cast steps
As far as I can tell, the Detail Associates parts are out of production;
Dick Steinbrenner' s article in the August 1982 recommends modifying Quality

Craft Reading cast steps to the LV steps, but these are out of production as

well.

Thanks in advance!
Ben Hom
























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Inside metal roofs?

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

Inside metal roofs (in general): How did they attach the outer layer of
boards? My thinking woud be that they are tongue-and-groove boards nailed
down only at the peak and eaves , so as to avoid nailing through the metal.
However the obvious isn't always true.

How thick was the metal sheet such that scuffing or damage was a concern?

KL
Dug out the 1906 Car builder's Dictionary. There are several inside metal roofs shown, unfortunately without dimensions or material call-outs.

The outside sheathing was supported by longitudinal purlins made of nominal 1" material laid flat. The lining inside the car was nailed to another set of purlins, spaced down from the upper set, and the sheet metal roof sheets fit in the space in between. The travers edges of the roof sheets were fastened to the sides of the carlines. No dimensions are given, but the thickness of the roof is the total of:lining, purlin, air space, purlin, and sheathing. If each of these is 1", that's five inches, although the lining and sheathing are likely closer to 3/4"

The thickness of the galvanized sheet iron is not specified, but from my experience patching the outer layer of the inside metal roof on an URTX car in a museum, it appeared to be 20 GA, maybe 18 ga., both less that 1/16" thick. These roofs were made of sheet metal, and had no structural value whatsoever. The same was true of the outside metal roofs that superseded them, The metal roof sheets had to be laid directly over a wood roof to keep them from deforming when stepped on.

Self supporting "all steel" roofs weren't introduced until the period between the wars.


Re: SANTA FE WAR EMERGENCY GONDOLAS

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Apr 4, 2010, at 6:52 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:


I am working on a Santa Fe GA-61 War Emergency Gondola. In
replicating the brake rigging does anyone know if the rod between the
brake cylinder and the bell
crank (beneath the brake wheel) ran at an angle or was there another
means of transmitting the motion. I have seen photos of other cars
that used a system of chains
and pulleys (or an extra lever) or a torque bar so that the brake rod
ran parallel to the center beam. I have not found anything on the
Santa Fe cars.
Bill, there is a B end view of a Ga-61 in my Santa Fe Open Top Cars
book which will help to answer your question. I'll send you a scan
off-list.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: National Perishable Freight Committee

lnnrr <lnnrr@...>
 

A few direct references appear in re: ventilated boxcars. It seems
to differentiate insulated fruit and vegetable cars from
uninsulated fruit and vegetable cars. The insulated cars would
be exempt from the same cargos that a refrigerator cars would not
carry. This circular does not specify acceptable cargos for
noninsulated cars.
It does refer to the double door cars in that it stresses that
the seals must be applied so as to join the two doors together.
Thus as weather changed the two doors could be moved as a pair
to close or open the doorway for ventilation.
The main gist of this circular seems to be "Protective Services"
and making clear what are "Carriers Protective Services" and
what are "Shippers Protective Services". It goes into some detail
as to what should be done when shipper does or does not specify
some detail.
We have discussed roads that seemed to give expidited service to
perishable shipments but reading about all the activity involved
in servicing these cars leaves me wondering how often hoppers
passed by while getting this service. This degree of attention required had to slow the transportation process greatly.
Even with the mechanical reefers there are required services.
Once or twice a day someone has to read the thermometer, check
the fuel, and pull the dipstick. It's a wonder the system has
worked as well as it has.
Chuck Peck

--- In STMFC@..., "brianleppert@..." <brianleppert@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@ wrote:

Do these cover ventilator box car operations also?
Yes

. . . especially what would typically be carried in ventilated box cars vs. refrig and vent box cars?

Yes

I would guess it would be regional also
Not really, except it does cover rules for cars traveling into or thru Canada. Temperatures and time of year, however, are covered.



Al Kresse

Romeo, Michigan
Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: interchange (Meat from CGW)

Thomas Baker
 

Jerry,

Thank you. I didn't think the CGW would turn over its meat to the PRR and the NYC. The NKP was a wise choice back in the day. I recall reading about the NKP Berkshires zipping past NYC freights pulled by diesels at points where the NKP and the NYC ran parallel. So that fits.

Tom

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... on behalf of switchengines
Sent: Sun 4/4/2010 10:34 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: interchange (Meat from CGW)


Tom, this is an easy one for me to answer. Back in the 1970's I had a
friend that worked for the CGW in Chicago during the 1950's, and need-
less to say, as a railroader he had many stories to tell. Well to answer you
for sure, it was the NKP. The CGW would set out a Bellwood, and the IHB
was waiting to take the cars on a fast trip to Blue Island for icing, and the
on to Osbourne and the NKP for pick-up by a fast freight for Bellevue, Ohio.
I might add here that the meat traffic was far more time sensitive than fruits
or vegetables, requiring very fast handling to prevent shrinkage, and the
associate damage claims. He told me of overtime trips to the NKP with single
cars that had gone Bad Order after quick repairs to make sure that they made
the connection that day and were out of town on time.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

Woodstock, Ill.

--- In STMFC@..., Thomas Baker <bakert@...> wrote:



In reference to the preferred forwarders for PFE and SFRD, a question
came up on the CGW list: Thursday was "meat night" on the CGW. Meat
refrigerator cars came from South St. Paul and Austin, Minnesota, in the
north; from packers in Omaha and Council Bluffs on the west end; and
from packers in Kansas City, St. Joseph, Missouri; and from Des Moines
and even Marshalltown, Iowa. And in addition, the M&StL sometimes
delivered cars from Decker in Mason City to the CGW in Marshalltown.
Most of the meat moved to Oelwein, Iowa, where cars from the north,
west, and south were combined and moved on to interchange mostly with
the IHB in Bellwood.

People have pointed out the the Pennsy was the least preferred forwarder
as far as PFE/SFRD were concerned with the NYC, and B&O not far from the
bottom of the list. Does someone out there know who got most of the
meat and perishablies--if there were any--from the CGW. The list
mentions the ERIE as the road that reliably delivered. From photos I
have seen I infer that the NKP was a reliable forwarder. Meat of course
had to move and move as expeditiously as possible. Who got the stuff
from the CGW?

Tom



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability

Benjamin Hom
 

Mark,

Do you know for certain if he has other sources besides normal distribution
channels? I am not interested in wasting time calling a shop only to get
the answer, "Walthers doesn't have it". I can check the Walthers site
myself.

Ben Hom


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Mark
M
Sent: Sunday, April 04, 2010 9:41 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: LV Northeastern Caboose - HO Scale Part Availability

 
Hello, Ben

Did you find your caboose parts? Johns Hobby Shop in Mansfield OH might get
them! 4195264426

Mark Morgan

--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Looking for a source for the following parts to model Lehigh Valley
Northeastern cabooses in HO:

Detail Associates 6509 (rectangular end window)
Detail Associates 6510 (porthole end window)
LV 3-tread cast steps

As far as I can tell, the Detail Associates parts are out of production;
Dick Steinbrenner's article in the August 1982 recommends modifying Quality
Craft Reading cast steps to the LV steps, but these are out of production as
well.

Thanks in advance!


Ben Hom


Re: interchange (Meat from CGW)

switchengines <jrs060@...>
 

Tom, this is an easy one for me to answer. Back in the 1970's I had a
friend that worked for the CGW in Chicago during the 1950's, and need-
less to say, as a railroader he had many stories to tell. Well to answer you
for sure, it was the NKP. The CGW would set out a Bellwood, and the IHB
was waiting to take the cars on a fast trip to Blue Island for icing, and the
on to Osbourne and the NKP for pick-up by a fast freight for Bellevue, Ohio.
I might add here that the meat traffic was far more time sensitive than fruits
or vegetables, requiring very fast handling to prevent shrinkage, and the
associate damage claims. He told me of overtime trips to the NKP with single
cars that had gone Bad Order after quick repairs to make sure that they made
the connection that day and were out of town on time.

Happiness, Jerry Stewart

Woodstock, Ill.

--- In STMFC@..., Thomas Baker <bakert@...> wrote:



In reference to the preferred forwarders for PFE and SFRD, a question
came up on the CGW list: Thursday was "meat night" on the CGW. Meat
refrigerator cars came from South St. Paul and Austin, Minnesota, in the
north; from packers in Omaha and Council Bluffs on the west end; and
from packers in Kansas City, St. Joseph, Missouri; and from Des Moines
and even Marshalltown, Iowa. And in addition, the M&StL sometimes
delivered cars from Decker in Mason City to the CGW in Marshalltown.
Most of the meat moved to Oelwein, Iowa, where cars from the north,
west, and south were combined and moved on to interchange mostly with
the IHB in Bellwood.

People have pointed out the the Pennsy was the least preferred forwarder
as far as PFE/SFRD were concerned with the NYC, and B&O not far from the
bottom of the list. Does someone out there know who got most of the
meat and perishablies--if there were any--from the CGW. The list
mentions the ERIE as the road that reliably delivered. From photos I
have seen I infer that the NKP was a reliable forwarder. Meat of course
had to move and move as expeditiously as possible. Who got the stuff
from the CGW?

Tom


SANTA FE WAR EMERGENCY GONDOLAS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I am working on a Santa Fe GA-61 War Emergency Gondola. In replicating the brake rigging does anyone know if the rod between the brake cylinder and the bell
crank (beneath the brake wheel) ran at an angle or was there another means of transmitting the motion. I have seen photos of other cars that used a system of chains
and pulleys (or an extra lever) or a torque bar so that the brake rod ran parallel to the center beam. I have not found anything on the Santa Fe cars.

Thanks in advance for any help.

Bill Pardie

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